Review: 'Through the Shadowlands’ describes Julie Rehmeyer's ME/CFS Odyssey
I should note at the outset that this review is based on an audio version of the galleys and the epilogue from the finished work. Julie Rehmeyer sent me the final version as a PDF, but for some reason my text to voice software (Kurzweil) had issues with it. I understand that it is...
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Transferring Benefits to Puerto Rico- Help

Discussion in 'Finances, Work, and Disability' started by sparklehoof, Apr 27, 2015.

  1. Hi,
    I'm a RI resident and was awarded SSI & SSDI, Medicare and Medicaid in 2003.

    I'm interested in learning if there is a way for me to legally collect full benefits.

    My SSDI is about $342/month which won't be enough.

    Does anyone have experience with this?
     
  2. Denise

    Denise Senior Member

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    @sparklehoof - I am not sure what you mean by full benefits. Can you provide additional details?



    FWIW -as I understand it, SSDI amounts are based on one's pre-disability earnings so the amount one receives should be the maximum for what one's earning history provides.
     
    WillowJ likes this.
  3. Yes, you are correct based on my understanding as well. I became sick at 19 and started working at 14, but I didn't have enough work history to bring my SSDI benefits over an amount that they calculate (somewhere around $699) to where I don't need additional support. The SSI is a state program that can supplement the SSDI of an individual who doesn't have enough work history to survive on SSDI alone.

    For ex. If I became sick at 45 and worked full time from ages 22-44, than I would have probably earned more than enough money from my work history to where I wouldn't need supplemental support from the state. With SSDI, my understanding is that you are allowed to be married without losing your benefits, you can have more than $2,000 worth of assets at a given time, and you can move relatively freely between states.
     
  4. minkeygirl

    minkeygirl But I Look So Good.

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    Why not just call SSA and ask them?

    I have SSDI, which is a federal program and it is not based on assets. I could have a million dollars and it wouldn't matter. You get SSDI if you've worked enough to contribute.

    SSI is also a federal plan but its for those who have not contributed enough to get SSDI (which is higher). Double check on that. I'm not sure how it works with a spouse. I don't think it matters.

    Some states have a program but I don't think its for extended periods. CA I think was only a year.
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2015
  5. WillowJ

    WillowJ คภภเє ɠรค๓թєl

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    WA, USA
    SSDI is calculated based on your recorded earnings from your work history. Someone who became sick at 19 (or another similarly young age) isn't going to have a very supportive work history, even if they started working early (as pay rates would typically be low for minors, and people that age are usually working around school hours & responsibilities).

    As best as I understand it, you can't change the amount except by working more, or by changing the person they calculate from. If you have a retired parent, you may be able to calculate from your parent's earnings.

    Or if you had to go on disability while a minor (or can prove you were disabled while a minor)--not sure if this is "minor=under 18" or "minor=under 23/similar", I think they use a parent's.

    http://www.disabilitysecrets.com/page1-20.html
    http://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/dependent-benefits-children-ssdi-recipients.html
    http://www.ssa.gov/redbook/eng/overview-disability.htm#a0=3

    I wish you all the best.
     
    SOC likes this.
  6. Denise

    Denise Senior Member

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    From what I understand if a disabled or retired parent has a child (or children) who became disabled before the age of 18, the child (children) would be entitled to SSDI based on the parent's earnings.
    I believe that the child (children) only receive those benefits if they are not married.

    Also from what I understand, many SSA employees are unaware of many of the details of SSDI and SSI. Contacting them could be hit or miss in terms of reliable info.

    Good links @WillowJ :)
     
  7. minkeygirl

    minkeygirl But I Look So Good.

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    Just call them.
     
    WillowJ likes this.
  8. caledonia

    caledonia

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    Cincinnati, OH, USA
    If info from SSA is hit or miss, you may want to try calling them several times so you get different reps. Hopefully, several of the reps will agree on one thing.

    Other than that, you may want to consult with a disability representative or lawyer. Call your own lawyer if you used one to win your case.

    Other than that, your only other choice in the near future is trying to work part time (be sure to stay below the Substantial Gainful Activity and/or Ticket to Work Program dollar limit!).

    You should get also cost of living increases over the years which will increase the amount, but that's more of a long term thing.
     
  9. Thanks to everyone who posted- everything you wrote sounds true based on my knowledge as well.
    Since PR is US territory, but not part of the continental US some laws and programs are different and so I was wondering if anyone reading the post may have experience in PR or even more specifically someone who has experience moving from the states who was on SSI (which PR) doesn't offer.

    In my case, since I became ill as a teenager my SSDI benefits and SSI benefits are roughly equal. My SSDI isn't enough to live on by itself.
    I have been looking into workings do I haven't given up but have been too sick.
    Does anyone in the forum live in PR or have legal experience/SSI experience there?

    Thanks
     

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