Phoenix Rising tells QMUL: release the PACE trial data
Mark Berry, Acting CEO of Phoenix Rising, presents the Board of Directors’ open letter to Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) urging them to release the PACE trial data, and hopes that other non-UK organisations will join British charities in the same request...
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Topic for the ladies -- endometrial hyperplasia and progestin

Discussion in 'General Treatment' started by SOC, Jul 9, 2012.

  1. SOC

    SOC

    Messages:
    7,802
    Likes:
    16,459
    Well, it's not cancer, tg. :D The gyno is thinking about prescribing a progesterone replacement (probably Provera) to try to clear up my major endometrial hyperplasia. This sounds a lot better than dealing with anesthesia and surgery, but I'm wondering if anyone else with low progesterone has tried replacement and if it's had any effects on ME/CFS either positive or negative.

    I know that birth control pills with progestin have caused some women with ME/CFS problems, but they probably had normal levels of progesterone, so adding more progesterone could be problematic. I'm wondering more about taking progestin when progesterone is low and the estrogen/progesterone balance is way out of whack.

    TIA
     
  2. Ema

    Ema Senior Member

    Messages:
    4,276
    Likes:
    5,992
    Midwest USA
    Yay for not cancer!

    If it were me, I would want to use either natural micronized progesterone (Prometrium) or a transdermal bioidentical progesterone cream rather than a progestin. Progestins can have nasty side effects in some women. I personally do not have any side effects from the bioidentical progesterone cream and it definitely helps my symptoms (mainly anxiety and muscle pains) to keep my levels at a luteal mid-range.

    Some women do get excessive fatigue from oral Prometrium but other women like it because it can help with sleep at night. Oral progesterone produces a metabolite in the liver that has similar effects to a benzo (allopregnanolone). This effect is avoided with the creams because they don't pass through the liver. But some trial and error might be required to find the best fit for you.

    http://www.aafp.org/afp/2000/1015/p1839.html
     
    Tunguska likes this.
  3. Sallysblooms

    Sallysblooms P.O.T.S. now SO MUCH BETTER!

    Messages:
    1,767
    Likes:
    347
    Southern USA
    Does your doctor understand bio hrt? Compounded progesterone etc. I use them. Not sure why some doctors don't know about them.
     
  4. SOC

    SOC

    Messages:
    7,802
    Likes:
    16,459
    I don't know if she does, but I'll ask her. Thanks for the suggestion!
     
  5. Sparrow

    Sparrow Senior Member

    Messages:
    691
    Likes:
    858
    Canada
    I have no useful input. Just wanted to say I'm sorry you've been having to deal with this. :(
     
  6. roxie60

    roxie60 Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,787
    Likes:
    598
    Central Illinois, USA
    I have never ben able to take any hormones including bio hrt. I had such strong reactions to extremely small amt of bio hrt at least we think that was it, this was awy before understanding ME/CFS.
     
  7. Sallysblooms

    Sallysblooms P.O.T.S. now SO MUCH BETTER!

    Messages:
    1,767
    Likes:
    347
    Southern USA
    If a doctor knows how to test and give the right amount it is good. Hormones work together so I hope you can get good help.
     
  8. roxie60

    roxie60 Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,787
    Likes:
    598
    Central Illinois, USA
    yes, yeah it is not cancer!!!
     
  9. SOC

    SOC

    Messages:
    7,802
    Likes:
    16,459
    Ema -- Thanks for the great information including the aafp article! Now I feel like I can discuss this reasonably intelligently with my gyno. :)

    Sparrow -- Thanks for the sympathy. It has been an unpleasant month or so since my annual physical at the beginning of June. My labs "fell through the cracks" multiple times. Then my GP went on a 6 month break so I "fell through the cracks", according to doctor's group practice. The result being I ended up in the ER with a doctor who was not only incredibly rude to me, he was nasty to the friend who brought me in at some ungodly hour of the morning. :mad:

    At least once they actually saw my condition, they got an immediate sonogram which then (finally) inspired them to get me a prompt appt with the gyno. Then (I kid you not) it took them 10 days to do a biopsy that was supposed to take a day or two. I think that one would have found a home in one of their cracks, too (sorry :redface:) if I hadn't kept nagging them about it once it was overdue. Sheesh! What is it we pay these people so much for, again?

    PS: Why is it that when you go to the ER for "female problems", the receptionist, the nurse, the student nurse, the doctor, and the sonographer are all males? Is that some kind of natural law?
     
  10. Sparrow

    Sparrow Senior Member

    Messages:
    691
    Likes:
    858
    Canada
    SOC - Ugh. You know, I used to have so much faith in the medical community... Not so much anymore. I'm really sorry you ended up in that situation, especially for such totally frustrating reasons.

    I think the trick with ER visits for female problems is to get your husband a good case of penis rot at the same time. Then there's guaranteed to be at least some of each gender on staff.
     
  11. SOC

    SOC

    Messages:
    7,802
    Likes:
    16,459
    Yep, that would do it, lol! You always crack me up. :rofl:
     

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page