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Toledo OH water supply compromised by toxin from algae

Discussion in 'Addressing Biotoxin, Chemical & Food Sensitivities' started by acer2000, Aug 2, 2014.

  1. acer2000

    acer2000 Senior Member

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    http://www.toledonewsnow.com/story/26178506/breaking-urgent-notice

    "Lake Erie, which is a source of drinking water for the Toledo water system may have been impacted by a harmful algal bloom (HAB). These organisms are capable of producing a number of toxins that may pose a risk to human and animal health. HABs occur when excess nitrogen and phosphorus are present in lakes and streams. Such nutrients can come from runoff of over-fertilized fields and lawns, from malfunctioning septic systems and from livestock pens."

    The Toledo water treatment plant had sample positive for microcystin. Mycrocystin is a toxin produced by Cyanobacteria. Residents are being warned not to drink the water.
     
    slayadragon likes this.
  2. Forebearance

    Forebearance Senior Member

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    Great Plains, US
    Yeah, how about that. I'm really sad for the people of Toledo.
     
  3. acer2000

    acer2000 Senior Member

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    I think this is (or is going to be) a big problem for the great lakes region. I suspect unless reforms are made to curb the use of the nutrient rich substrates that fuel these blooms, this isn't the last time we are going to hear about this. I doubt global warming is helping either. :-(
     
  4. Forebearance

    Forebearance Senior Member

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    Great Plains, US
    Yes, I hear you on that.
    I recently noticed that the Huron River has a lot more algae on it than it used to.
     
  5. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Logan, Queensland, Australia
    When this occurs in an ocean the fish get sick, often die, and are poisonous so cannot be eaten. When it happens to fresh drinking water, you cannot easily just move a fishing boat somewhere else to solve it. This problem turns up in communities around the world periodically. Farming areas and downstream of farming areas are particularly susceptible to this.

    In geological time increasing water temperatures are closely associated with increasing algal bloom, and the entire ocean can become toxic if the global temperature rises enough. This causes mass extinction of both land and sea animals. We are not nearly that hot at the moment though.
     
    Forebearance likes this.

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