Invest in ME Conference 12: First Class in Every Way
OverTheHills wraps up our series of articles on this year's 12th Invest in ME International Conference (IIMEC12) in London with some reflections on her experience as a patient attending the conference for the first time.
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theanine similar to excitatory glutamate?

Discussion in 'General Treatment' started by kisekishiawase, Jan 27, 2015.

  1. kisekishiawase

    kisekishiawase sad

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    southeast asia
    Excuse me for posting if this has been brought up before but i cant find it.

    I know theanine has sedating/anti anxiety effect but what im confused about why does it say theanine is
    structurally similar to the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, absorbed, hydrolysis to L-glutamate also cross the blood–brain barrier.

    Does it mean it also act an an excitatory/has an excitatory effect?

    If someone would kindly explain.
    Thank you :)
     
  2. zzz

    zzz Senior Member

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    Like many aspects of neurochemistry, it's complicated.

    Yes, theanine is structurally similar to glutamate. Some sources say it is a weak NMDA agonist, while others say that it is a weak NMDA antagonist. Like many substances, the exact mechanism of action is unclear. What is clear, though, is that theanine has a relaxing, anxiolytic effect in people, with no side effects for most people, especially at lower doses such as 100 or 200 mg. At higher doses, or in very sensitive people, theanine can be slightly sedating. Under no circumstances does it have an excitatory effect.

    Many people (including me) find that L-theanine can be a very useful part of a sleep protocol. Personally, I find that if I wake up in the middle of the night and have trouble getting back to sleep, taking 400 mg of L-theanine will usually overcome this problem rather quickly.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2015
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  3. PeterPositive

    PeterPositive Senior Member

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    I've tried L-theanine with no result, using a dose of 150mg.
    If it doesn't work for you may want to try Ashwaganda, it has worked wonders for me: 300mg one/two times a day. Very relaxing effect. (I use this product)

    Often times I also add 250mg of GABA, especially in the evening for sleep.

    Good luck
     
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  4. kisekishiawase

    kisekishiawase sad

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    @zzz thank you for the reply and info :thumbsup:
    Do you think it also work like benzo, mostly on gaba?
    @PeterPositive Ive heard about ashwaganda and skullcap. And interested in it. (Theres also hops) Skullcap work on benzo receptor. Ashwaganda i havent found the mechanism.
    I cant decide between them or glycine, theanine. I was thinking to give theanine, glycine a try.
    But whars important is not only how it helps sleep but which doesnt effect my horrible tachycardia, palpitation, excitatory. :(
    Which product of gaba you use?
    Thank you for sharing :thumbsup:
     
  5. PeterPositive

    PeterPositive Senior Member

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    I am sure you already know, palpitations could be linked to a lack of electrolytes.
    If not, potassium and/or magnesium could help.

    This one:
    http://www.kirkmanlabs.com/ProductKirkman/30/1/GABA/

    cheers
     
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