Review: 'Through the Shadowlands’ describes Julie Rehmeyer's ME/CFS Odyssey
I should note at the outset that this review is based on an audio version of the galleys and the epilogue from the finished work. Julie Rehmeyer sent me the final version as a PDF, but for some reason my text to voice software (Kurzweil) had issues with it. I understand that it is...
Discuss the article on the Forums.

The Trouble With Scientists

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Simon, May 15, 2015.

  1. Simon

    Simon

    Messages:
    1,921
    Likes:
    14,541
    Monmouth, UK
    How One Psychologist Is Tackling Human Biases in Science

    A really interesting blog at Nautilus (I'm using some of its brilliant lines), which argues that
    Or put another way, scientists (psychologists) have been strong on identifying cognitive bias (aka flawed thinking), but surprisingly blind when it comes to applying this insight to themselves.

    Brian Nosek, the psychologist behind the reproducibility project and star of this blog elaborated
    “How do I get from mush to beautiful results?”

    The background to all this is the widely-acknowledged problem that scientists are rewarded for high proflie eye-catching studies, however flaky, and penalised for not doing this.
    Nosek then explains how this causes problems on the ground, given that such crystal clear results are rare:
    The blog goes on to look at the reverse problem, where group think blocks more dramatic new ideas emerging:
    The ability of an entrenched Old Guard to stop better ideas emerging is captured by Max Planck's famous quote:

    The answer?

    Slightly less excitingly, Nosek is keen to set up a better way of doing science by launching a pre-registration scheme for research called the Open Science Framework (OSF). This is based on pharmacological research, where decades of hiding disappointing results and spinning findings led to regulators requiring all results, good and bad, to be published and the goals of a study to be set out explicitly before it started, not written to suit findings after the results are out. So oddly the bad boy of pharmacoloy research has become a good example (though hardly perfect).

    [Ironically, perhaps, as getting dud results into licensed drugs has become harder, pharmacology has really focused on replication of early drug findings - no point persuing useless leads if the regulator will find you out before you can reach the market]

    Read the full blog
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2015
    oceiv, ahmo, helen1 and 7 others like this.

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page