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"The public deserves to know if the next blood transfusion ... will give them XMRV"

Discussion in 'XMRV Testing, Treatment and Transmission' started by George, Apr 5, 2010.

  1. George

    George Guest

    NEW, Novel XMRV retrovirus diagnostic test developed

    New investigation supports correlation between XMRV and prostate cancer

    Novel XMRV retrovirus diagnostic test developed

    Philadelphia, PA, April 5, 2010 – The recently discovered retrovirus, xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV), has been identified in some prostate cancer patients. In light of conflicting data concerning XMRV, standardized diagnostic testing is important to identify patients in which XMRV is present and to determine whether it plays a role in the incidence of prostate cancer. An article published in the April issue of Urology is a step in this direction as researchers from Emory University report the successful development of an experimental clinical test for XMRV.
    (I can't find the artical anybody seen it?)

    "We cannot as a scientific community begin to answer the basic questions of XMRV transmission, frequency in the population, association with disease, etc. until we can effectively test for infection," according to lead investigator John A. Petros, MD, Associate Professor of Urology, Emory University School of Medicine and Veterans Administration Hospital.

    Dr. Petros and co-investigators adapted technology developed in the HIV arena (neutralizing antibody assay) and have developed a serum test that can identify patients who have previously been infected with the virus. This assay has been rigorously confirmed by two independent labs and two independent technologies (PCR and FISH), thus confidence in the accuracy of the test is high.
    (So is this one of the 6 groups mentioned that were developing the tests for Busch?)

    The mode of transmission of the virus is unknown. No method is available to screen either blood or tissue donors for infection and no data are available regarding whether the virus can be transmitted by blood transfusion or tissue transplantation. Dr. Petros comments, "The public deserves to know if the next blood transfusion or organ donation will give them XMRV retrovirus, an infection which lasts for life, and could possibly be related to prostate cancer. The failure to develop accurate tests for this virus is a serious public health oversight."

    Although the assay used in the present report involved the inhibition of infection of target cells by viral-like particles with the XMRV envelope protein expressed on their surface, results also suggest that more standard serologic tests for antibodies against specific viral antigens can be developed in the future.

    The authors conclude that "our report adds to the growing body of evidence that XMRV is indeed a novel gamma-retrovirus capable of infecting humans and that at least some patients with prostate cancer have been infected with XMRV. We have reported serologic evidence of infection and that the serology correlated with tissue-based assays. The concordance of 3 independent methods of detecting infection added confidence to the assertion that this recently discovered virus is real and possibly related to human disease. Robust clinical assays are needed to detect XMRV infection, and much work remains to be done in determining whether XMRV is indeed an oncogenic virus or simply an associated epiphenomenon."
     
  2. julius

    julius Watchoo lookin' at?

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    :victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory:


    HOME RUN!!!


    :victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory::victory:
     
  3. leaves

    leaves Senior Member

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    Wow....
    I can't stop smiling :)
     
  4. shrewsbury

    shrewsbury member

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    Public release date: 5-Apr-2010

    Contact: Sarah Kane
    s.kane@elsevier.com
    215-239-3798
    Elsevier Health Sciences

    New investigation supports correlation between XMRV and prostate cancer
    Novel XMRV retrovirus diagnostic test developed

    Philadelphia, PA, April 5, 2010 The recently discovered retrovirus, xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV), has been identified in some prostate cancer patients. In light of conflicting data concerning XMRV, standardized diagnostic testing is important to identify patients in which XMRV is present and to determine whether it plays a role in the incidence of prostate cancer. An article published in the April issue of Urology is a step in this direction as researchers from Emory University report the successful development of an experimental clinical test for XMRV.

    "We cannot as a scientific community begin to answer the basic questions of XMRV transmission, frequency in the population, association with disease, etc. until we can effectively test for infection," according to lead investigator John A. Petros, MD, Associate Professor of Urology, Emory University School of Medicine and Veterans Administration Hospital.

    Dr. Petros and co-investigators adapted technology developed in the HIV arena (neutralizing antibody assay) and have developed a serum test that can identify patients who have previously been infected with the virus. This assay has been rigorously confirmed by two independent labs and two independent technologies (PCR and FISH), thus confidence in the accuracy of the test is high.

    The mode of transmission of the virus is unknown. No method is available to screen either blood or tissue donors for infection and no data are available regarding whether the virus can be transmitted by blood transfusion or tissue transplantation. Dr. Petros comments, "The public deserves to know if the next blood transfusion or organ donation will give them XMRV retrovirus, an infection which lasts for life, and could possibly be related to prostate cancer. The failure to develop accurate tests for this virus is a serious public health oversight."

    Although the assay used in the present report involved the inhibition of infection of target cells by viral-like particles with the XMRV envelope protein expressed on their surface, results also suggest that more standard serologic tests for antibodies against specific viral antigens can be developed in the future.

    The authors conclude that "our report adds to the growing body of evidence that XMRV is indeed a novel gamma-retrovirus capable of infecting humans and that at least some patients with prostate cancer have been infected with XMRV. We have reported serologic evidence of infection and that the serology correlated with tissue-based assays. The concordance of 3 independent methods of detecting infection added confidence to the assertion that this recently discovered virus is real and possibly related to human disease. Robust clinical assays are needed to detect XMRV infection, and much work remains to be done in determining whether XMRV is indeed an oncogenic virus or simply an associated epiphenomenon."

    ###

    The article is "XMRV Infection in Patients With Prostate Cancer: Novel Serologic Assay and Correlation With PCR and FISH" by Rebecca S. Arnold, Natalia V. Makarova, Adeboye O. Osunkoya, Suganthi Suppiah, Takara A. Scott, Nicole A. Johnson, Sushma M. Bhosle, Dennis Liotta, Eric Hunter, Fray F. Marshall, Hinh Ly, Ross J. Molinaro, Jerry L. Blackwell, and John A. Petros. It appears in Urology, Volume 75, Issue 4 (April 2010) published by Elsevier.
     
  5. George

    George Guest

    About the good doctor

    John Petros, M.D.
    Petros Photo2..jpg
    Associate Professor of Urology, Emory University School of Medicine and Veterans Administration Hospital
    Dr. John Petros spends his days at Emory and Emory's Winship Cancer Institute caring for patients and researching better therapies and treatments in the field of urological cancers. During his 12 years at Emory, he has cared for patients with a variety of urological cancers including: prostate, testicular, bladder, and renal cancers. The urological surgeon also treats patients at the Atlanta Veterans Administration Medical Center.

    Dr. Petros has extensive expertise in mitochondrial DNA mutations in prostate cancer  research that determines how the mutations protect cancer cells from their normal cell death and enhance tumor growth and metastasis, or the spreading of the cells to other parts of the body. He also has investigated how cancer-associated stromal cells may support the survival of cancer cells.

    Dr. Petros received his B.A. from Washington University in St. Louis and his M.D. from Loyola University. He completed an internship and residency in urology at Barnes Hospital in St. Louis. He was awarded a National Institutes of Health Surgical Oncology Training Grant where he completed a two-year fellowship at Washington University. In 1993, Dr. Petros joined the faculty at Emory, where he now serves as an associate professor in urology.

    He has published dozens of research articles and has also written a number of book chapters. He is a member of the American Urologic Association, the Atlanta Urologic Society, and the Society of Surgical Oncology.

    Related Links:
    http://www.emoryhealthcare.org/departments/wci/sub_menu/Prostate_Cancer.html
    http://cancer.emory.edu/index.cfm?pageid=36

    So his work could help elucidate some of the problems that we have too?? Hum, Ok in the sausage grinder of science we killed the pig and drained the blood. We're making progress. (grins)
     
  6. julius

    julius Watchoo lookin' at?

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    Why stop? Just keep smiling all day long. We deserve it!:D:D:Retro smile::Retro tongue:;):tear::cool:
     
  7. George

    George Guest

  8. George

    George Guest

    I'm hoping for a "smilin' month". (big grins)
     
  9. julius

    julius Watchoo lookin' at?

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    So far the forecast looks good.

    Every day this month has brought amazing news. Even over the weekend!!!
     
  10. shrewsbury

    shrewsbury member

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    I find Dr Petros a bit shy:

    Dr. Petros comments, "The public deserves to know if the next blood transfusion or organ donation will give them XMRV retrovirus, an infection which lasts for life, and could possibly be related to prostate cancer. The failure to develop accurate tests for this virus is a serious public health oversight."

    ps I posted the Urology article
     
  11. Koan

    Koan Be the change.

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    GOOD DOG, GEORGE!

    Thank you!
     
  12. Dreambirdie

    Dreambirdie work in progress

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    N. California
    Sometimes good things DO happen. (I am reminding myself.)
     
  13. starryeyes

    starryeyes Senior Member

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    lol! I think it's great that both of you are so motivated to get this info out to us as fast as you can. :) And yes, this time, George is the Winner!

    tee
     
  14. George

    George Guest

    Hey Islandfin did you get the e-mail that I sent you the other day???
     
  15. George

    George Guest

    I'm so glad you found it. My brain is still on hiatus right now. I couldn't find it.
     
  16. julius

    julius Watchoo lookin' at?

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    So, I just want to make sure I'm clear on this. The test they have developed is validated and effective right? If so, then what happens next? How long does it generally take from this point till when the test is available to sickos?

    And if any Canadians can answer this one, how long till it's available and covered here?
     
  17. Kati

    Kati Patient in training

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    Julius. maybe the virology division of the BC CDC needs a little nudge... I may send them some most recent journal articles. It's been a while since I told em that CFS might be linked to XMRV and XMRV might be in the blood supply- and they answered back that CFS was not a reportable disease. Well dudes, maybe it should be....
     
  18. George

    George Guest

    Julius Great Question!

    Unlike the WPI who put their test out there to counter other tests being offered there is no rush for these guys to make it available to the public. In fact if the powers that be, deem it prudent the test could stay strictly for use in research until there is a "drug therapy" available for public consumption. In other words the only way to get tested would be to get yourself into a study. These guys were one of the "six" that were in a race to come up with a reliable "serology" test to be used to test the blood supply and for the NIH to test the general population for prevalence.

    It looks like the test that Illa Singh came up with is currently the exclusive property of ARUP and they are keeping it for research use only right now. The WPI was in that rat race . . . I mean group that was working to produce a 100 percent accurate serology test so maybe if they come up with one as well, (that doesn't infringe on someone else patten) then we might get a shot at getting tested even if we can't get into a study.

    I know the chances of me getting into a study here in Texas are like non existent.(growlies)
     
  19. julius

    julius Watchoo lookin' at?

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    Thanks Kati and George,

    Kati, this news got me thinking that it may be time for a big push up this side of the border. But if the test isn't actually available yet, I'm going to hold off till it is. I don't want to waste what little steam I have when there's still not much to gain.
     
  20. Hope123

    Hope123 Senior Member

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    I hope money and patent concerns do not delay quick availability of any good test that comes out.
     

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