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The Power of Poop........our future?.........bottom up or nose down.....take your pick

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Countrygirl, May 27, 2014.

  1. Countrygirl

    Countrygirl Senior Member

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    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-27503660

    The brave new world of DIY faecal transplant

    By William KremerBBC World Service
    [​IMG]
    Continue reading the main story
    Health Check
    You would have to be desperate to take a sample of your husband's excrement, liquidise it in a kitchen blender and then insert it into your body with an off-the-shelf enema kit. This article contains images and descriptions which some might find shocking.

    In April 2012, Catherine Duff was ready to try anything. She was wasting away with crippling abdominal pains, nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea so severe she was confined to the house. At 56, in the US state of Indiana, she had come down with her sixth Clostridium difficile infection in six years.

    "My colorectal surgeon said: 'The easiest thing would be to just take your colon out.' And my question was: 'Easier for whom?'"

    Appalled at the idea of losing her large intestine, Duff's family feverishly searched for alternative treatments on the internet. One of them turned up an article about a doctor in Australia, Thomas Borody, who had been treating C. diff with an unusual process known as faecal transplant, or faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT).

    Clostridium difficile is an obnoxious microbe, usually kept in check by other bacteria in our guts. Problems arise when antibiotics remove some of these "friendly" bacteria, allowing C. diff to take over. One doctor compares it to the hooligan on the bus who is prevented from doing any harm by the sheer number of people on board. A course of antibiotics is equivalent to some of these people getting off at a stop, allowing the hooligan to run wild. About 50% of a person's faeces is bacteria, and a faecal transplant is like a whole new busload of people - the friendly bacteria - being hustled on board.

    Read More Here.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 28, 2014
    manna likes this.
  2. manna

    manna Senior Member

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    i think its similar to hiv patients benefitting from blood transfusions. ive heard of an me/cfs patient who got a huge boost from a blood transfusion. personally i think blood is a better way to go but maybe not always as "easy" as poop.

    id try fecal implants if i could. i had some bd 500 which is used in one area of organic agriculture. basically organic cow dung stuffed in a cows horn and buried. its kind of alchemical, as above (horn) so below (poop)...and combining heaven and earth. the result was very deep and powerfull. ive also eaten worm castings lol and got a surprising lift from it. apparently native americans were partial to "lifting their spirits" by eating buffalo dung. of course you should be very caarefull when eating animal stools and i recommend no-one try this, thjough i doubt they would anyone heh. also someone chewing your food and imparting their saliva to it and then you swallow that would, imo, be very helpfull. could i do it? doubtfull but seeing as we're talking about such things, heres the place to say anything similar.
     
  3. Bob

    Bob

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    Shouldn't this be in the 'Other Health News and Research' section? It doesn't mention ME/CFS.

    The article focuses on the treatment of C. Difficile, and it also mentions inflammation of the colon, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

    And it briefly mentions MS, autism and diabetes in the following section:
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2014
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  4. Bob

    Bob

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    I'm interested in the idea of a 'synthetic stool', as they call it. (i.e. lab-refined collection of probiotic bacteria, isolated from human faeces, that can be taken in a capsule.)

    The BBC article mentions it here:
    I looked up the researchers mentioned, and found a list of the 33 strains of bacteria used to create a synthetic stool, by Dr Petrof in Canada, to treat C. Difficile:
    http://www.microbiomejournal.com/content/1/1/3/table/T1

    The table is taken from this paper which describes the successful treatment of two patients (who had C. Difficile) using this 'synthetic stool':
    http://www.microbiomejournal.com/content/1/1/3
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2014
  5. manna

    manna Senior Member

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    id be very surprised if the synthetic stools work. reducing it down to beneficial bacteria is an opversimplification imo. nonsense to many but i think the shape of the organs (stomach, small intestine, large intestine) the food has passed through impacts on vitality and action, plus the concentrated bodily secretions and fluids and even the fact the stool was made inside a being that, in my understanding, has a healthy and strong bio-magnetic energy field. in bio-dynamic agriculture, organs herbs etc are stuffed inside animal organs to infuse a certain life force that is carried over to the soil. you need the colon i think. ive heard that synthetic stool has cured one case of c difficile up to now but im not sure i'll accept that as fact. if synthetic stools do work, that'll be great...

    other similar ideas, blood transfusions (helps hiv+ and one me/cfs'er i know), bd 500 (bio-dynamic preperartion), worm castings (give you quite a buzz-don't do it though, and the shape of the worm is key in imparting life force), somebody chewing you food for you--yuck but as an idea.
     
  6. natasa778

    natasa778 Senior Member

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    London UK

    One of the 'inventors' of robogut will be presenting at a UK conference - Brunel University - on 9th November
     

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