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The Nutritional Composition of Red Meat

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by heapsreal, Feb 5, 2013.

  1. heapsreal

    heapsreal iherb 10% discount code OPA989,

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    Key Points
    Lean red meats are:

    An excellent source of high biological value protein, vitamin B12, niacin, vitamin B6,
    iron, zinc and phosphorus

    A source of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fats, riboflavin, pantothenic acid,
    selenium and possibly also vitamin D

    Mostly low in fat and sodium

    Sources of a range of endogenous antioxidants and other bioactive substances
    including taurine, carnitine, carnosine, ubiquinone, glutathione and creatine.

    http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewconten...7550,d.dGI#search="nutrient content red meat"
    LaurieL, Seewell and SickOfSickness like this.
  2. LaurieL

    LaurieL Senior Member

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    Seeing the nutrient content, its sort of interesting that those nutrients are very similar in what I found supplementation to be beneficial to me as well. I am sort of drawing inference to the fact that many of us require these in extra amounts. I am kind of wondering if anyones early response to this disease mirrors my own, in that when I first became sick, I absolutely had to have a high protein diet or I could not function at any level. I craved protein, I couldn't get enough.

    Its interesting that the nutrients found in red meat, are all over this forum, dont you think? :)

    Lauriel
    SickOfSickness likes this.
  3. ggingues

    ggingues $10 gift code at iHerb GAS343 of $40

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    What is "classified" as a lean red meat? I eat quit a bit of steak tips and chicken for lunch, with a veggie, now brocoli, (used to be carrots) since it is low carb.

    GG

    PS I read an article on Mercola recently where Vitamin D is discussed with pork (bacon), I believe the study is old and not sure how reliable.
  4. sandgroper

    sandgroper

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    3 pieces of scotch fillet this week.....Yum and good for me too...thanks Heaps
    I eat it coz i have trouble cooking and its quick and easy and does not produce
    cravings (unlike starchy things)
    heapsreal likes this.
  5. heapsreal

    heapsreal iherb 10% discount code OPA989,

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    i remember reading along time ago of the nutrients in meat, but i think that sometimes we are brain washed into thinking that we need fruit and veges for vitamins etc but meat is never really mentioned and meat is probably more nutrient dense then any other one particular food source. I also remember reading stuff on the anti atkins low carb diets saying that they are low in many vitamins etc i think they are trying to pull the wool over our eyes. I think alot of info or tales are repeated that much that they are just taken as gospel without actually looked into. Im not saying no fruit and veg but meat is a good source of nutrients and even contains omega 3 fats which one would think we only get from fish.

    So enjoy a nice big steak, yum!!
    peggy-sue likes this.
  6. Seewell

    Seewell Senior Member

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    Since being ill i dont know why but i have become so sensitive to good or bad food.If i buy run of the mill
    pork from the supermarket it makes me fell sick.But if i buy it from a local farm that sells free range pork
    i feel like i get a real boost from it.Could be happy pigs,i dont know. uumm um
    peggy-sue likes this.
  7. Shoesies

    Shoesies Senior Member

    Big honking organic ribeye in my future..YUM.
    peggy-sue and LaurieL like this.
  8. LaurieL

    LaurieL Senior Member

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    Yum. Okay everyone...dinner at shoesies! ;)
    peggy-sue and Shoesies like this.
  9. peggy-sue

    peggy-sue

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    I had a cat with remarkably good taste. He wouldn't eat meat (or cheese) that came from groTesco.
    He spat it out.:p He liked proper meat, from the butcher.


    Rib-eye steak with gorgonzola melted on top.... garlic mushrooms...
  10. Shoesies

    Shoesies Senior Member

    peggy-sue YUM. I like big portabellas stuffed with lump crab and cheese...oh wow. That big ribeye calling my name
    peggy-sue likes this.
  11. LaurieL

    LaurieL Senior Member

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    Soooo....where am I going and what time do I need to be there? :thumbsup:
    peggy-sue likes this.
  12. IreneF

    IreneF Senior Member

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    The nutrient composition of red meat varies depending on the animal's diet. Grass-fed beef, for example has a more favorable lipid (fat) profile than grain-fed beef. Most cattle are "finished" on grain before slaughter, alas, even if they grazed for most of their lives.

    The US Dept of Ag has several databases that provide all sorts of nutritional info. I think the USDA dietary recommendation aren't that great--they want you to drink a lot of milk and eat a lot of grains--but the raw data is there.
    camas and peggy-sue like this.
  13. Little Bluestem

    Little Bluestem Senescent on the Illinois prairie, USA

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    It could also be genetic difference. The pigs raised to produce run of the mill supermarket pork are pretty much genetic freaks. I doubt that they could survive outside. The local farmer who raised free range pigs probably uses an older type of pig.
    Seewell and peggy-sue like this.
  14. Seewell

    Seewell Senior Member

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    Good point,i also read somewhere when they are you know what,if they are in a stressed state it effects the meat.
    Its real horrible when u think about it..
  15. Timaca

    Timaca Senior Member

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    The problems with red meat consumption include increased risk of cancer. And too much protein of any kind can lead to osteoporosis. See "Reduce your Cancer Risk" and "Strengthen Your Bones" here: http://tinascocina.com/healthy-eating/ (Yes, this is my blog ;) ). And if you want a good recipe, I just put one up yesterday for granola "bars". :)

    Best,
  16. heapsreal

    heapsreal iherb 10% discount code OPA989,

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    I have read the opposite actually, high carbs causes insulin resistance which would increase cancers risks, cardiac issues etc etc
    sandgroper likes this.
  17. peggy-sue

    peggy-sue

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    Of course you don't get good meat from abused and stressed animals which have been bred for fast growth and pumped full of hormones and antibiotics and kept in animal equivalents of Guantanamo Bay!

    And I wonder about the sort of people who don't care about that going on, too.

    The really big "meat" problem, health-wise is processed stuff and all the vile additives that go into those.
    jimells and heapsreal like this.
  18. Shoesies

    Shoesies Senior Member

    Yes, yes, yes!! To all the above. I will not buy my meat in the supermarket...I do buy at Whole Foods..but mostly our meat comes from the local farm. No hormones, no antibiotics, grass fed...and we get pork there too. Went to tour the farm first..I just hate what they do in feed lots and slaughter houses. We also get a lot of venison here in the mountains.
  19. Ema

    Ema Senior Member

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    This is absolutely bunk based on junk science. We must read beyond the headlines!

    http://www.policymic.com/articles/5393/red-meat-does-not-raise-risk-of-cancer-heart-disease




    Ema
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  20. jimells

    jimells Senior Member

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    The livestock breeding programs are disturbing and in many ways short-sighted.Too much inbreeding creates bad genetic defects and tends to make the animals susceptible to disease, in addition to disease encouraged by overcrowding and poor sanitation. That's one reason they have to feed all those antibiotics. The trend is toward a few standard breeds, even fewer sires, so that if a new disease develops, a huge proportion of all the livestock may become ill, requiring disposal, and causing shortages and price spikes. The same approach is used with field crops such as corn, soybeans, and wheat. If a third of the wheat crop is all one variety, which succumbs to some fungus, people depending on affordable wheat are in big trouble. But why should Cargill, Monsanto, and ADM care - they can always make money on something else.

    A long time ago I raised a bunch of meat chickens to sell at the farmers market. The day-old chicks had all the smarts bred right out of them. I build their portable pen/shelter with a perch, just like I did for my egg-laying hens. But the meat birds were so dumb, they didn't know what the perch was for. I used to drag their pen around the dooryard every day or two, so they could have fresh grass. When the pen started moving, they would just stand there and let the pen run over their feet, unless someone moved 'em back with a broom. Poor critters!

    But they were awfully good eating - 1/2 half a breast would fill your dinner plate. Yum.

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