When the 'Holiday Season' Is No Holiday at all for Those With ME/CFS
Is December getting to you? Jody Smith shares some thoughts on some of the struggles that all too often attend this time of year ...
Discuss the article on the Forums.

The Infectious Etiology of Chronic Diseases (from an IOM workshop)

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by WillowJ, Mar 1, 2015.

  1. WillowJ

    WillowJ คภภเє ɠรค๓թєl

    Messages:
    3,763
    Likes:
    4,844
    WA, USA
    http://books.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=11026&page=R1

    http://iom.edu/Reports/2004/The-Inf...-Mitigating-the-Effects-Workshop-Summary.aspx

     
    oceiv, halcyon and Sidereal like this.
  2. Sidereal

    Sidereal Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,098
    Likes:
    17,215
    There is a chapter on enteroviruses.
     
    oceiv, WillowJ and halcyon like this.
  3. halcyon

    halcyon Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,345
    Likes:
    5,494
    Interesting discussion starts on page 53. Talks about the same challenges that Dr. Chia talks about with detection, which led him to tissue testing instead.

    I really hope Dr. Lipkin knows what he's doing. As best I can tell he's looking at stool, and as mentioned in this report, enteroviral shedding in stool only lasts between 2 to 8 weeks after infection. I'm terrified he's going to turn up false negatives and then it's back in the closet with us for another few decades.
     
    WillowJ and Sidereal like this.
  4. Sidereal

    Sidereal Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,098
    Likes:
    17,215
    I'm worried about that too.
     
  5. WillowJ

    WillowJ คภภเє ɠรค๓թєl

    Messages:
    3,763
    Likes:
    4,844
    WA, USA
    Well, this would at least give appropriate references to write letters to his paper?

    Also, a lot of people (supposedly) read this forum.
     
  6. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

    Messages:
    10,477
    Likes:
    17,165
    I think Dr Lipkin's main forte is as a pathogen hunter. He likes discovering new pathogens, and has great expertise in this area. I believe Lipkin interest is in finding possibly new pathogens associated with ME/CFS, more than working out a theory on how pathogens already known to be associated with ME/CFS — pathogens such as enterovirus or EBV — might trigger ME/CFS and give rise to ME/CFS symptoms.

    When it comes to figuring out the biochemistry and immunology that would explain how a pathogen, known or unknown, can give rise to ME/CFS and its symptoms, that may be a different skill set.

    In this respect, I think the work Dr Michael VanElzakker is excellent. His vagus nerve infection hypothesis (VNIH) of ME/CFS is the first theory I have seen with the power to explain how an infection can give rise to the symptoms found in ME/CFS.

    The VNIH is the first theory of ME/CFS that starts at the very beginning of the etiological chain — with the infection — and then posits the mechanism by which that infection can give rise to the symptoms that appear in ME/CFS — symptoms that are at the very end of the ME/CFS causal chain. So the scope of the VNIH is extraordinary: it provides a testable theory of the whole pathophysiology of ME/CFS from beginning to end.


    I would like to see more theories like the VNIH. For example, if we look at the autopsies showing that the brains of ME/CFS patients are infected with enteroviruses (whereas in the control group, no brains were so infected), the issue here is the biochemical and immunological mechanisms by which these brain infections could give rise to the symptoms of ME/CFS.

    The mechanism of how a brain infection leads to ME/CFS symptoms may well be exactly the same as the one VanElzakker proposes in his VNIH: namely that inflammatory cytokines resulting from the infection switch on the sickness behavior response, which then causes the ME/CFS symptoms (sickness behavior symptoms are very similar to those of ME/CFS).
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2015
    jepps and halcyon like this.

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page