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The control group is out of control.

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Sean, Feb 14, 2015.

  1. Sean

    Sean Senior Member

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    Esther12, zzz, GracieJ and 3 others like this.
  2. wdb

    wdb Senior Member

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    I like the reference to parapsychology

    I've never understood why if a parapsychologist conducts an unblinded subjective trial with positive results it's methodologically flawed worthless nonsense but if a psychologist conducts an unblinded subjective trial with positive results it's wonderful research that should be widely and uncritically reported.
     
  3. A.B.

    A.B. Senior Member

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    Because psychiatry and psychology have managed to convince the world that they are a science, experts and know what they're doing even without appropriate methodology.
     
    L'engle and green_monster like this.
  4. chipmunk1

    chipmunk1 Senior Member

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    the latter is common and normal practice not sure about the former.
     
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  5. Woolie

    Woolie Senior Member

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    Thanks for this, @Sean, I found it really interesting!

    The most relevant part for us is the bit about the researcher allegiance effect in psychotherapy. If you do a metanalysis of all psychotherapy studies meeting certain quality criteria, and also include as a predictor the particular allegiance of the researchers (which therapy they "believe in"), you get a massive effect: Cohen's d = 0.54, which is huge, p > .001.

    In other words, you can predict with pretty good accuracy what the results of a psychotherapy study will be just by knowing what the researchers themselves believe in.

    @Dolphin posted on this in an earlier thread:

    http://forums.phoenixrising.me/inde...-overview-of-reviews-munder-et-al-2013.22466/
     
    L'engle, Esther12, Sidereal and 3 others like this.
  6. chipmunk1

    chipmunk1 Senior Member

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    what happens if you exclude that effect?

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2015
    Woolie likes this.
  7. A.B.

    A.B. Senior Member

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    When rheumatologists (?) study CBT and GET for CFS, they find it's harmful (worse physical function and pain scores): Health-related quality of life in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: group cognitive behavioural therapy and graded exercise versus usual treatment. A randomised controlled trial with 1 year of follow-up.

    As for psychotherapy studies, I wonder what happens when researchers study a therapy they dislike / don't believe in.
     
    L'engle, Sean, Woolie and 3 others like this.
  8. chipmunk1

    chipmunk1 Senior Member

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    In the sixties i believe behaviourists studied psychoanalysis and came to the conclusion that the more psychoanalysis a person had the less likely it was that the person would recover.
     
    L'engle, Sean, Woolie and 1 other person like this.
  9. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Hibernating

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    The lesson is: Be careful what you measure. What you think you are measuring might not be what you are actually measuring.
     
    L'engle likes this.

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