Invisible Illness Awareness Week 2016: Our Voices Need to Be Heard
Never heard of Invisible Illness Awareness Week? You're not alone. Jody Smith sheds a little light to make it more visible
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Th17 Cytokines and the Gut Mucosal Barrier

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by nanonug, May 7, 2012.

  1. nanonug

    nanonug Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,250
    Likes:
    422
    Virginia, USA
    Enid and anne_likes_red like this.
  2. SOC

    SOC Senior Member

    Messages:
    7,839
    Likes:
    16,544
    Nice find, nanonug! That might explain a lot for some (or all) ME patients.

    I still can't figure out how I've managed to avoid the gut problems common in ME, especially given my very low IL-23 and low IL-17.
     
  3. nanonug

    nanonug Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,250
    Likes:
    422
    Virginia, USA
    Indeed! Maybe you just happened to have the right kind of microbiota protecting you...

    By the way, in case you didn't this question in the other thread, would you mind sharing the name of the test you did to find out about the Th17 stuff? Is that something you can order on the Internet? Thanks!
     
  4. SOC

    SOC Senior Member

    Messages:
    7,839
    Likes:
    16,544
    If so, I'm probably killing them off with long-term clarithromycin. :rolleyes:

    My immune testing was done at the University of Miami through Dr Rey. The page says "Cytokine Multiplex-18 Report" at the top. It could be specific to that lab. You might be able to find an immune test that includes IL-17 and IL-23 and maybe some other cytokines related to Th17. I think low cytotoxic T-cells may be related, too.
     
  5. nanonug

    nanonug Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,250
    Likes:
    422
    Virginia, USA
    Either that or just selecting the strains resistant to clarithromycin...

    Thanks! Will try to find that particular test or something similar...
     
  6. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,032
    Likes:
    951
    I don't think it's that easy. I never had yeast or pathogenic gut bacteria, I took tons of good probiotics, I have very high numbers of most good bacteria and still have these gut issues.
     
  7. nanonug

    nanonug Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,250
    Likes:
    422
    Virginia, USA
    SIBO?

    By the way, microbiota is composed of hundreds, maybe thousands of species acquired shortly after birth that in many cases assemble themselves in biofilms. These entities are then able to bidirectionally communicate with the host's immune system, sometimes for the best, sometimes for the worse. That's why I suggested that maybe SOC was just lucky with his microbiota. No amount of supplementation, is ever going to dramatically change this.
     
  8. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,032
    Likes:
    951
    I agree that microbiota play an important role for gut issues. On the other side there are hundreds of other possible causes for gut issues, especially when you have viral infections or genetic defects. Look at people with HIV, they didn't have gut issues before their illness but when they don't receive treatment most of them have. What roles play goblet cells and what role play dendritic cells etc..
     
  9. Enid

    Enid Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,309
    Likes:
    859
    UK
    Perhaps at least we know the gut mucosal barrier/integrity has broken down so all GI research/understanding has to be a good thing for us. (possibly a role or more in many other diseases). Roll on this medical Cinderella - understanding the Gut and it's complex role as probably the most essential part of the immune system. Personally no doubts where ME all began whatever triggers.
     
  10. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,032
    Likes:
    951
    I fully agree.
     

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page