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Ten weeks of physical-cognitive-mindfulness training reduces fear-avoidance beliefs about work-relat

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by JaimeS, Aug 31, 2016.

  1. JaimeS

    JaimeS Senior Member

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    Full title :
    Ten weeks of physical-cognitive-mindfulness training reduces fear-avoidance beliefs about work-related activity: Randomized controlled trial

    Otherwise known as 'dammit, Naviaux did not banish them with a wave of his magic metabolome'.

    Wellll maybe he did, this is from May. Some fool must have cited it for it to show up in my Google alerts.


    Jay, Kenneth MSc; Brandt, Mikkel MSc; Jakobsen, Markus Due PhD; Sundstrup, Emil PhD; Berthelsen, Kasper Gymoese MD; schraefel, mc PhD; Sjøgaard, Gisela PhD, Med Sci; Andersen, Lars L. PhD


    Section Editor(s): Leischik., Roman

    Open Access
    Supplemental Author Material


    Article Outline


    Author Information

    aNational Research Centre for the Working Environment, Lersø Parkallé, Copenhagen

    bInstitute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark

    cElectronics and Computer Science University of Southampton, United Kingdom

    dPhysical Activity and Human Performance Group, SMI, Department of Health Science and Technology, Aalborg University, Denmark

    eDepartment of Abdominal- & ENT-Anaesthesia, Aalborg University, Denmark

    fThe Carrick Institute—Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation Cape Canaveral, FL.

    Correspondence: Kenneth Jay, National Research Centre for the Working Environment Copenhagen, Denmark (e-mail: kennethjay@icloud.com;kennethjay1978@gmail.com).

    Abbreviations: FAB = Fear-avoidance beliefs, FABQ = Fear-avoidance beliefs questionnaire, PCMT = hysical-cognitive-mindfulness training, PRF = Pain-related fear, REF = Reference.

    The authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose.

    Supplemental Digital Content is Available for this Article.

    Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal's Website (www.md-journal.com).

    This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivatives License 4.0, which allows for redistribution, commercial and non-commercial, as long as it is passed along unchanged and in whole, with credit to the author. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0

    Received January 12, 2016

    Received in revised form May 17, 2016

    Accepted May 23, 2016

    Abstract

    Abstract: People with chronic musculoskeletal pain often experience pain-related fear of movement and avoidance behavior. The Fear-Avoidance model proposes a possible mechanism at least partly explaining the development and maintenance of chronic pain. People who interpret pain during movement as being potentially harmful to the organism may initiate a vicious behavioral cycle by generating pain-related fear of movement accompanied by avoidance behavior and hyper-vigilance.

    This study investigates whether an individually adapted multifactorial approach comprised of biopsychosocial elements, with a focus on physical exercise, mindfulness, and education on pain and behavior, can decrease work-related fear-avoidance beliefs.

    As part of a large scale 10-week worksite randomized controlled intervention trial focusing on company initiatives to combat work-related musculoskeletal pain and stress, we evaluated fear-avoidance behavior in 112 female laboratory technicians with chronic neck, shoulder, upper back, lower back, elbow, and hand/wrist pain using the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire at baseline, before group allocation, and again at the post intervention follow-up 10 weeks later.

    A significant group by time interaction was observed (P  < 0.05) for work-related fear-avoidance beliefs. The between-group difference at follow-up was –2.2 (–4.0 to –0.5), corresponding to a small to medium effect size (Cohen's d = 0.30).

    Our study shows that work-related, but not leisure time activity-related, fear-avoidance beliefs, as assessed by the Fear-avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire, can be significantly reduced by 10 weeks of physical-cognitive-mindfulness training in female laboratory technicians with chronic pain.


    LOLOL:

    Keyword Highlighting
    Highlight selected keywords in the article text.

    meditation
    motor control exercise
    movement-related fear
    neuromatrix
    pain catastrophizing


    Wowww.

    Full text here: http://journals.lww.com/md-journal/...eks_of_physical_cognitive_mindfulness.16.aspx
     
  2. Kyla

    Kyla ᴀɴɴɪᴇ ɢꜱᴀᴍᴩᴇʟ

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    @JaimeS is this about ME/CFS? Neither is mentioned in the abstract.

    If not maybe it could be moved to the "other health research" forum?
    Not trying to be nitpicky, but we have enough crappy psychosocial studies without adding from other fields, no? :);):D
     
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  3. osisposis

    osisposis Senior Member

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  4. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    This is a pain avoidance paper, but its the same modus operandi as the psychobabble for ME. If I have the energy I will take a look and see if it looks like its not babble, but at this point I presume babble until proven otherwise.

    PS. I just skimmed some bits, it still looks like babble. I think its time we insist on objective long term outcome measures to assess this kind of research. Anything less is unacceptable. I wonder if these researchers could rise to that challenge?
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2016
  5. osisposis

    osisposis Senior Member

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    sorry, I have to giggle a little here, I was in a group for many years where extreme fear was basicly shoved down your throat by some, and I thought it was a little funny when some of them started buying into this "retraining your brain thing" cant remember now what the exact term they used, some spent a lot of money on this kind of treatment and claimed it cured them , that's when I really started realizeing that ya for some fear was ruleing their world, I mean to each it's own I guess but the whole ordeal just made me even mader at the protochild and his rantings. cant say it's for me but maybe it does help some people.??? I'm mean ya, phycological and physicologial stress'ers does involve the same pathway , cant think of names,para sympathatic, something like that , to long sence I looked at that, (witch is no doubt involved in why some chemical exposures leave you where than you cant deal with much stress because it starts making you physically ill) but like I tried to tell them , maybe, maybe combat , extreme phycologial stress for a period of time could play in but even those in combat likely had some chemical exposures and no one has gotten this disease that I know of because of fear alone, cant tell you how many times I tried to get some people to calm down, so maybe if only for something to believe in ,for some people it may help. and I did notice that childhood abuse was mentioned in the microbiome paper, you know, everyone is different, even in the way they handle stressful situations, so I shouldn't laugh I guess, whatever helps helps .
     
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  6. msf

    msf Senior Member

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    JaimeS, being familiar with your excellent writing skills, I really did think that this was a spoof when I read the title.

    They might not have even got close to working out what ME is, but they do seem likely to win the most hyphens in a sentence award. I wonder if this is only partially a result of psychosomatic jargon; perhaps Danish is like German and you can stick a whole load of nouns together to form a word, and this is how they translated those words: either way, it sounds ridiculous in English.

    Obviously I´m not going to comment on (or even read) the actual paper.
     
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  7. Luther Blissett

    Luther Blissett Senior Member

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    @JaimeS, thought you might like this further info.

    The most interesting part of the paper for me was the reliance on theories by Gordon Waddell.

    He was one of the first in the BPS field to have his theories used for denying insurance claims all over the world.

    For a good overview of his impact in the BPS field:

    http://dpac.uk.net/2014/09/gordon-waddells-biopsychosocial-attack-on-disabled-people/

    and a couple of papers I found about his theories;

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12911018
    A structured evidence-based review on the meaning of nonorganic physical signs: Waddell signs.
    Fishbain DA1, Cole B, Cutler RB, Lewis J, Rosomoff HL, Rosomoff RS.





    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15502683
    Is there a relationship between nonorganic physical findings (Waddell signs) and secondary gain/malingering?


    Fishbain DA1, Cutler RB, Rosomoff HL, Rosomoff RS.

    (my first ever snarky medical paper quote :D)
     
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  8. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Hibernating

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    A therapy that explicitly focuses on changing conscious cognitions changes leads to a change in questionnaire answering behaviour?

    It's not rocket science.

    I'd be impressed if and only if they actually demonstrated their patients doing substantially more work.
     
  9. TiredSam

    TiredSam The wise nematode hibernates

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    Whoa, hang on, before you start investigating, can you just explain that first bit again, the "The Fear-Avoidance model proposes a possible mechanism at least partly explaining" blah blah?

    "model", "propose", "possible", "at least", "partly" - how many qualifications are needed in one sentence? The next sentence is no better - "potentially", "may" ...

    Are these people prepared to commit themselves to anything, or merely in training for the arse-covering world championships? They should be required to explain their model, including mechanism and causation, clearly and unambiguously before being allowed to "investigate" anything. Definitely.
     
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  10. JaimeS

    JaimeS Senior Member

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  11. JaimeS

    JaimeS Senior Member

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    I christen thee Citizen Scientist, @Luther Blissett !
     
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  12. TiredSam

    TiredSam The wise nematode hibernates

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    Although I may potentially to some extent be persuaded that I have possibly at least partly misunderstood them, of course. Perhaps.
     
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  13. JaimeS

    JaimeS Senior Member

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    But are you sure that you maybe kind of feel that way about it? :D
     
  14. TiredSam

    TiredSam The wise nematode hibernates

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    "Sure?" :wide-eyed: We don't do "sure", sorry.
     
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  15. osisposis

    osisposis Senior Member

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    not waisting my time to read the paper. I have low back problems and I actually do stretching manouvers to help with that, doesn't scare me at all, lols, actually fells pretty dang good :)
     
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  16. Glycon

    Glycon World's Most Dangerous Hand Puppet

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    What is this I don't even o_O
     
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  17. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

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    Thanks for them. Anyone know if there's any sort of consensus on this?
     
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  18. taniaaust1

    taniaaust1 Senior Member

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    I dont see this study to do with anything about us.. this was a working group of people who didnt even have ME/CFS. It is probably bullshit though, with insurance companies or something behind it.

    Those CBT preachers probably will be strongly targeting other patient groups once we all escape their clutches.
     
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  19. Luther Blissett

    Luther Blissett Senior Member

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    I do know that the theories of Waddell were the foundation of the BPS school in the UK (along with Mansell Aylward), and were first used on patients with lower back pain. It seems to have been a good way for insurers and the state to deny work related injuries.

    He claims his theories have been misunderstood and the fact that it saved a lot of money for big institutions, just a co-incidence.

    I didn't see anything about him complaining when his literature was being handed out before crucial social security votes in the Houses of Parliament the other year.
     
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  20. Glycon

    Glycon World's Most Dangerous Hand Puppet

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    To be fair, CBT makes a lot more sense and is often worth trying when it comes to managing pain (if said pain doesn't have obvious physiological basis at the time). That treating ME with CBT makes about as much sense as treating diabetes with CBT doesn't make CBT itself universally illegitimate.
     

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