The 12th Invest in ME Conference, Part 1
OverTheHills presents the first article in a series of three about the recent 12th Invest In ME international Conference (IIMEC12) in London.
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Ten Psychology Findings That Have Been Difficult to Replicate.

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by barbc56, Aug 2, 2017.

  1. barbc56

    barbc56 Senior Member

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    An informative and quite entertaining article. The one about the picture on the wall is downright creepy.
    My bold.
    https://digest.bps.org.uk/2016/09/1...indings-that-its-been-difficult-to-replicate/
     
  2. TiredSam

    TiredSam The wise nematode hibernates

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    Makes me wonder why I bother reading pop psychology :(.
     
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  3. wdb

    wdb Senior Member

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    Only ten ?
     
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  4. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Hibernating

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    No one has a lifetime long enough to discuss them all. ;)
     
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  5. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

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    Oh pop psychology... you used to make me feel so smug and wise. Now look at you!
     
  6. JaimeS

    JaimeS Senior Member

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  7. ebethc

    ebethc Senior Member

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    is psychology really in crisis?? I crossed paths w someone I knew in college who's now a therapist and seemed pretty nuts herself! It made me question the field, but I don't know much about it and have had positive therapy experiences myself..
     
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  8. Woolie

    Woolie Senior Member

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    These ten have been submitted to the most systematic replication efforts - multiple labs, lots of participants, careful control of methods used, etc.
    I do not think this stuff has filtered through much to the clinical profession of Psychology. But its big amongst Psychology researchers. All have heard of the "replication crisis". Young academics are increasingly expected to display an understanding of the issues in job interviews, etc.
     
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  9. Alvin2

    Alvin2 If humans were rational...

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    I think psychology can't see the forest for the trees. Those 10 studies, some make no sense, some are a dog chasing its own tail.
    That said they went from freud's ridiculous ramblings to a mechanistic view of emotions. They have not graduated to a realistic understanding of human emotional bonds and emotional development.
     
  10. JaimeS

    JaimeS Senior Member

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    Not psychologists, but psychological findings are having a "replication crisis". Research Group A publishes on Finding X. (They were coincidentally already treating patients under the assumption X was true.) Group B tries to find the same thing and fails. (Coincidentally, Group B did not have this pre-existing bias.)

    Trials like PACE make the whole business very public.
     
  11. ebethc

    ebethc Senior Member

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    I thought this letter by Dr Thomas Insel (former director of NIMH) to the APA was genius... He wrote it after the APA delivered the updated DSM (diagnostic manual for clinicians..) extremely late..

    Speaking of research, the DSM is founded on research and exists in part for insurance companies to decide to pay or how much to pay... If the validity of research is being questioned, then the insurance cos. will no doubt jump at the chance to pay less..
    "While many of these changes have been contentious, the final product involves mostly modest alterations of the previous edition, based on new insights emerging from research since 1990 when DSM-IV was published. Sometimes this research recommended new categories (e.g., mood dysregulation disorder) or that previous categories could be dropped (e.g., Asperger’s syndrome)."

    ...and I love me some shady Insel!
    the bold style is mine, to mark my fave shade (eg putting "reliability" in quotes... as if they're delivering it a wink and saying, "you know, more or less"), and the parentheses/italics are what I imagine is his internal monologue to be..lol:

    "The goal of this new manual, as with all previous editions, is to provide a common language for describing psychopathology. While DSM has been described as a “Bible” for the field, it is, at best, a dictionary, (you could have just delivered it in post-its for all the effort you put into it) creating a set of labels and defining each. The strength of each of the editions of DSM has been “reliability” (you know DSM is the foundation for insurance claims and referrals?!? this chaos is going to be the death of me... )– each edition has ensured that clinicians use the same terms in the same ways. The weakness is its lack of validity. (ditto last comment except more exasperated this time) Unlike our definitions of ischemic heart disease, lymphoma, or AIDS, the DSM diagnoses are based on a consensus about clusters of clinical symptoms, (we're a laughing stock in the medical community) not any objective laboratory measure. In the rest of medicine, this would be equivalent to creating diagnostic systems based on the nature of chest pain or the quality of fever. Indeed, symptom-based diagnosis, once common in other areas of medicine, has been largely replaced in the past half century as we have understood that symptoms alone rarely indicate the best choice of treatment.(my med school roommate is a neurosurgeon now... how did I get mixed up with the wrong crowd?)"​



     
  12. ebethc

    ebethc Senior Member

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    but research is the basis for the DSM, which is the basis for insurance evaluation/payment and referrals... it's the framework of the whole scaffold.. see the my other post...

    interesting topic..
     
  13. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Hibernating

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  14. Woolie

    Woolie Senior Member

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    This bit is so true!

    I do think if researchers limited themselves to intelligent, well informed questions (despite them being less exciting), a lot of this could have been averted.
     
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  15. Woolie

    Woolie Senior Member

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    @ebethc, DSM is Psychiatry, the replication crisis is in Psychology, different kettle of fish entirely.

    Psychiatry has its own problems, sure, but that's a different thread.
     
  16. sarah darwins

    sarah darwins I told you I was ill

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    It's been said often before within these pages — not least by me — but the more I see of psychology the more it reminds me of the Cultural Studies minor I took at college: a field where any conclusion is precisely as valid as its antithesis, where any point of view is 'legitimate'.

    All of which is fine for an academic discipline, and the process may here and there generate some light along with the comforting heat. But I wouldn't let a cultural theorist loose on a sick person. I'm not sure why psychologists get a pass (and a pay check).
     
  17. arewenearlythereyet

    arewenearlythereyet Senior Member

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    I think behavioural science in itself is not bad. There is much to be learned from the study of primates to understand human evolution and brain development etc. ( as one example). Psychology however seems to be prone to suffering from philosophical arguments creeping in. Once this happens, you might as well label it subjective opinion or a religion rather than science.
     
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  18. ebethc

    ebethc Senior Member

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    I must have misunderstood... I thought authors of DSM review research + use their own clinical experience to create the DSM
     
  19. Woolie

    Woolie Senior Member

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    The DSM is such a huge subject, hard to know where to start! But its largely a consensus document written by committees of practising psychiatrists (many publish too), and its primary purpose is to improve diagnostic agreement amongst clinicians who diagnose psychiatric and related disorders.

    Its kind of good to have a DSM. The criticisms are more around what diagnoses it includes and the criteria used for classifying a person with each disorder. One criticism is that many of the distinctions are artificial, and based more on historical tradition than on any real understanding of the aetiology (causes) of psychiatric disorders.

    Another is that the DSM (we're currently on version 5, DSM-V) is based more on the beliefs and personal interests of the committee members rather than on a systematic review of current theory or research. So if some suggest we get rid of a diagnosis X, there is usually a huge lobby group of psychiatrists who specialise in X who don't want that to happen. So it stays in.

    But I may be out of line there, they may do some research reviewing too.
     
  20. ebethc

    ebethc Senior Member

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    @Woolie

    I like Insell's POV re adding more science... It's a shame how little is understood about so many illnesses.. Insell has an interesting Ted talk about schizophrenia, for example... I live in a city w a big homeless population, and I think they're primarily suffering from some severe mental illness (vs down on their luck and w help could be functional again..)
     
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