Review: 'Through the Shadowlands’ describes Julie Rehmeyer's ME/CFS Odyssey
I should note at the outset that this review is based on an audio version of the galleys and the epilogue from the finished work. Julie Rehmeyer sent me the final version as a PDF, but for some reason my text to voice software (Kurzweil) had issues with it. I understand that it is...
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Taking an aspirin a day will cause cancer, not prevent it by Jonathan Benson

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by *GG*, Apr 17, 2012.

  1. *GG*

    *GG* Senior Member

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    Concord, NH
    http://www.naturalnews.com/035417_aspirin_cancer_prevention.html

    The article has links to other stories, just curious as to what other people think of this?

    I have been taking 83mg of Aspirin for a few years now, need to finish the research. But thought I would enquire as to what other people's experience/research has determined.

    thanks!

    GG

    PS I take LDN, which is supposed to be good for cancer, so perhaps I don't have much to worry about? I will raise this issue with my Dr at my next appt.
     
  2. caledonia

    caledonia

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    Cincinnati, OH, USA
    Aspirin works by lowering bad eicosanoids thus reducing pain, but it also lowers good eicosanoids at the same time. So maybe that's where the cancer causing part comes in.

    You would be better off taking fish oil which would lower bad eicosanoids and also increase good eicosanoids. Plus it doesn't have the side effects of harming your gastrointestinal tract.
     
    alex3619 and *GG* like this.
  3. baccarat

    baccarat Senior Member

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    The main conclusion is that it doesn't prevent cancer. There are too many variables involved in cancer and state that it can cause it seems farfetched to me.
    However, it's known that it does deplete certain vitamins and affects certain liver detoxification pathways. So if it has any impact at all, it may be indirect.
     
  4. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

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    As baccarat said, it's very difficult to make definite statements in medicine. It is highly likely that aspirin can have detrimental gastrointestinal effects in certain individuals. If you are one of those, I would stay away from aspirin. On the other side there are enough studies which show a cancer preventive effect of aspirin. So where do you belong to? That should be your only concern. As long as we do not know and as long as science is not able to put people into clearly defined effect specific groups, preventive medicine will always have the taste of gambling. We only know statistical probabilities of drug effects but we don't know in which group the patient is. Even if something works for 80% of the population, 2 out of 10 people will have no benefit or even induce damage by taking a drug that is not made for them although it is backed up by great studies.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/04/120409164525.htm

    Aspirin Reduces Cancer Risk: Is It Time to Include It in Cancer Prevention Guidelines?
    ScienceDaily (Apr. 9, 2012) A new report by American Cancer Society scientists says new data showing aspirin's potential role in reducing the risk of cancer death bring us considerably closer to the time when cancer prevention can be included in clinical guidelines for the use of aspirin in preventative care. The report, published early online in Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology, says even a 10% reduction in overall cancer incidence beginning during the first 10 years of treatment could tip the balance of benefits and risks favorably in average-risk populations...
     
  5. *GG*

    *GG* Senior Member

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    Thanks for the replies everyone. FYI I take 4 grams of Fish Oil/day, it's a prescription.

    GG
     
  6. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

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    The evidence speaks against Benson. If the active ingredient of aspirin was already used in 1543 BC, I'm quite sure that we would know if it was detrimental to the majority of humans.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/04/120419142932.htm

    Aspirin: New Evidence Is Helping Explain Additional Health Benefits and Open Potential for New Uses
    ScienceDaily (Apr. 19, 2012) New evidence is helping explain additional health benefits of aspirin. Researchers in Canada, Scotland and Australia have discovered that salicylate, the active ingredient in aspirin, directly increases the activity of the protein AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase), a key player in regulating cell growth and metabolism. AMPK which is considered a cellular fuel-gauge is switched on by exercise and the commonly used anti-diabetic medication metformin.

    The research from scientists at McMaster University, the University of Dundee and the University of Melbourne will be published in the April 20 issue of the journal Science.
    "We're finding this old dog of aspirin already knows new tricks," said Dr. Greg Steinberg, a co-principal investigator of the study. "In the current paper we show that, in contrast to exercise or metformin which increase AMPK activity by altering the cells energy balance, the effects of salicylate is totally reliant on a single Ser108 amino acid of the beta 1 subunit.
    "We show that salicylate increases fat burning and reduces liver fat in obese mice and that this does not occur in genetically modified mice lacking the beta1 subunit of AMPK," he said. Steinberg is an associate professor of medicine in the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine at McMaster University and the Canada Research Chair in Metabolism and Obesity.
    These findings are important as a large clinical trial is currently underway testing whether salsalate (a well-tolerated aspirin derivative), can prevent Type 2 diabetes.
    Salicylate, which is derived from willow bark, and is the active ingredient in aspirin, is believed to be one of the oldest drugs in the world with first reports of its use dating back to an Egyptian papyrus in 1543 BC.
    An anti-inflammatory drug first used as a painkiller more than a century ago, aspirin is now given to people at risk of heart attacks and strokes as well as patients with vascular disease. McMaster scientists played a key role in that previous research.
    Three studies published last month in the medical journal The Lancet reported that taking an aspirin every day may significantly reduce the risk of many cancers and prevent tumors from spreading. The unanswered question was how this anti-cancer benefit occurs.
    With many recent studies showing that metformin may be important for cancer prevention the authors' study raise the interesting possibility that aspirin may also be working in a similar manner; however, further studies are needed as the concentrations of salicylate used in the current study were higher than the cancer trials. Nonetheless, the researchers' results show the one thing that salicylates and metformin hold in common is their ability to activate AMPK.
     

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