The 12th Invest in ME Research Conference June, 2017, Part 2
MEMum presents the second article in a series of three about the recent 12th Invest In ME International Conference (IIMEC12) in London.
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Suspected adverse effects of HPV vaccine - Orthostatic intolerance & postural tachycardia syndrome

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Bob, Apr 19, 2015.

  1. Bob

    Bob

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    This is an investigation of 35 women who, it is thought, may have had an adverse reaction to HPV vaccine. The symptoms reported in this abstract sound very similar to CFS or a subset of CFS. i.e. 100% of the patients had orthostatic intolerance, 94% nausea, 82% chronic headache, 82% fatigue, 77% cognitive dysfunction, 72% segmental dystonia, 68% neuropathic pain, 60% POTS.


    Orthostatic intolerance and postural tachycardia syndrome as suspected adverse effects of vaccination against human papilloma virus.
    Brinth LS, Pors K, Theibel AC, Mehlsen J.
    Apr 13 2015
    Vaccine. [Epub ahead of print]
    doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.03.098.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25882168

     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2015
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  2. Wayne

    Wayne Senior Member

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    Thanks for posting this Bob. I've been fairly focused on vaccinations of late, and off the top of my head, recall the following. The HPV (Gardasil) vaccine is no longer being recommended in Japan by an official government agency that had previously endorsed it. A University in British Columbia has come out with a negative report on it. First of its kind lawsuits are being initiated in Spain against Merck, and I think some other government agencies for endorsing it without educating the public on the "adverse" (as in catastrophic) side effects. -- Also, Japan has now banned the MMR vaccine in Japan.
     
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  3. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    It's interesting that this study focused on Gardasil (quadrivalent HPV vaccination), but did not examine the other HPV vaccination Cervarix (bivalent HPV vaccine).

    I wonder what the risk profile for Cervarix is in comparison to Gardasil.


    Gardasil and the hepatitis C virus vaccine are the only two vaccines manufactured using yeast (according to this website listing vaccine ingredients).

    Hepatitis C is by far the vaccine most strongly associated with triggering ME/CFS.


    Perhaps "now" is not quite the operative word here, as Japan stopped using the MMR over 20 years ago. Japan continues to give measles, mumps and rubella vaccinations, though; they just do it with three separate injections. Interestingly enough, autism rates continue to rise in Japan.
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2015
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  4. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    It should be pointed out that a recent groundbreaking study found autoantibodies to adrenergic receptors in the 14 POTS patients tested in the study, with no autoantibodies found in the healthy controls (ref: here).

    This POTS study needs to be replicated, but if it is demonstrated that POTS is an autoimmune disease, and primarily caused by autoantibodies which target adrenergic receptors, then perhaps the investigation into these Gardasil vaccine adverse events might want to focus on how the vaccine is able to precipitate this sort of autoimmunity.

    Dr Yehuda Shoenfeld believes that the adjuvants in vaccines are responsible for triggering autoimmunity.

    Given that the Gardasil vaccine involves yeast in its production, possibly the presence of some yeast proteins in the vaccine might be playing a role in the triggering of this presumed POTS autoimmunity.


    What I would like to know is why, out of all the different possible antigens in the body, autoantibodies are often produced which target neurotransmitter receptors. Knowing this may provide a way to stop or reduce the production of anti-receptor autoantibodies.
     
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  5. chipmunk1

    chipmunk1 Senior Member

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    why do you believe neurotransmitter autoimmunity is more common than other autoimmune reactions?

    do you know what proteins of the receptor are being targeted?
     
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  6. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    Some time ago I was searching for studies examining autoantibodies in ME/CFS, and found just a handful. I noted that of all the different cell surface receptors, and all the different molecular components in the body, neurotransmitter receptor autoantibodies were found very frequently.

    This ME/CFS study found autoantibodies to the muscarinic cholinergic receptor 1, mu-opioid receptor, serotonin receptor 1A, and dopamine receptor D2. And this study found autoantibodies to the serotonin neurotransmitter itself.

    But I guess I don't know if this is because these studies just chose to focus on neurotransmitter receptor autoantibodies to the exclusion of everything else. Possibly because ME/CFS is considered a neurological disease, the primary interest might have been on neurotransmitters and neurotransmitter receptors.

    There are a few studies showing other types of autoantibodies in ME/CFS: this study found autoantibodies to microtubule-associated protein 2.


    Don't really know.
     
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  7. jimells

    jimells Senior Member

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    I recall hearing about this a few months ago. According to the BBC radio report, some psychobabblers determined that the HPV adverse effects experienced by the Japanese women were caused by some kind of mass hysteria/psychogenic something-or-other.

    The BBC didn't mention whether or not the psychobabblers were on the drug company payroll.
     
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  8. chipmunk1

    chipmunk1 Senior Member

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    you mean they didn't mention whether or not the psychobabblers were on drugs.(or went off them)
     
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  9. SDSue

    SDSue Southeast

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    Here is a fabulous article on the genetics behind Gardasil adverse reactions. I would have to think this applies to many vaccines and other triggers of ME/CFS.



    Outline of Article:

     
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  10. barbc56

    barbc56 Senior Member

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    To be fair, whatever your view on vaccinations, this author is biased and known for his anti vaccination rhetoric. He still believes that MMR vaccinations cause autism.

    This is an opinion piece dressed up as a study. There is no reference to it in Pub Med. This article is also on a prominent anti vaccination blog.

    I do not want to debate the pros and cons of vaccinations and my postion on them has been noted in many of my posts.

    If there are adverse effects to this vaccine which certainly could be plausible, these less than credible sources, IMHO, will not have a large influence on any policy regarding this vaccination.

    Whether people frequent these sites or believe what they say is a personal choice, so no disrespect is intended.

    Just sayin'

    Barb
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2015
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  11. natasa778

    natasa778 Senior Member

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    Didn't the same thing happen in Columbia just few months ago. Hundreds of young women had a very bad reaction to this vaccine (bad/contaminated batch?) and psychobabblers 'decided' it was some kind of mass hysteria. What a coincidence that the same kind of mass histeria happens by coincidence in various parts of the world in girls who receive the same vaccine, by coincidence.
     
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  12. SDSue

    SDSue Southeast

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    Bias is always the other guy lol.

    To be fair, if the anti-vax crowd is viewed as "biased", then surely some in the pro vaccine contingency - who overtly or covertly fund studies and stand to profit - are also biased. France, Japan, and others, too, stand guilty as biased, as they have banned not only Gardasil but other vaccines.

    My point in posting this article is that many of the genes and theories being questioned in vaccine related injuries are the same ones implicated in ME/CFS. Surely if we are worthy of further exploration, so are other ill patient groups.

    Whether or not vaccines play a role in autism or other injuries has yet to be determined, or there wouldn't be so much debate. As little as a decade ago, ME/CFS doctors who chose to help us were accused of quackery and bias. And so it goes with autism doctors. And so it will go with the next patient group. What inevitably is missing is the apology when a harmful substance is quietly removed from the market.

    Sitting squarely in the unfortunate position of having a politically volatile illness, I can't put myself in the position of denying an open mind to any group of patients. The time has come for individualized medicine, and genetics are beginning to play a huge role in that. Too many diseases and injuries from toxins, drugs, chemicals, etc were denied while populations continued to be injured.

    Considering my genetic shortcomings and susceptibility to ME/CFS, should I have one grandchild who develops autism I can assure you there will be lengthy debates before another is vaccinated. Call me biased at that point.

    Fortunately for me, I've not yet been called to make such a horrific decision. Until I'm asked to place a bet on my grandchildren, I'm not fully responsible to completely comprehend the complexities of this issue. I consider that a luxury.

    In the meantime, every issue that deals with injury due to genetics is of great interest to me. You see, someday I'd like to leave my home for something other than doctors.
     
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  13. barbc56

    barbc56 Senior Member

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    Are you talking about epigenetics? Now on that issue there are many viewpoints. At this point, I dont know enough to form an opinion one way or another.


    So sorry about you're grandchild. Like our children, we would do anything to spare them any misery. So I definitely relate to that.

    What's interesting is that concern for my grandchildren is one reason I am now even more vehement about vaccinations. Especially, with one daughter in LA.

    I guess my point is we might be in a similar situation but have come to very different conclusions.

    I think the fact that there are different perspectives/conclusions is part and parcel of being human.

    Not saying whether that is either positive or negative. It just is.

    Barb
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2015
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  14. SDSue

    SDSue Southeast

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    Oops. @barbc56 I must not have written clearly. Somehow we missed the "should" part of grandkids. I have no grandkids yet! Sorry for the confusion!
     
  15. barbc56

    barbc56 Senior Member

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    @SDSue

    Not a problem. Somtimes my writing is clear as mud!

    This fog can be irksome, but at least people here are understanding when it does happen.

    Now back to your grandkids, how old are they?:lol:

    Barb

    ETA

    On second reading, it looks like it was my misreading of what you wrote and not a lack of clarity on your part. Time for bed!
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2015
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  16. Valentijn

    Valentijn Senior Member

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    This is sounding like blatant pandering to the Yasko fanclub:
    Of course many test "positive" for the minor allele of C699T (a SNP, not a gene) - 50% of the general population has at least one copy of the minor allele. And the actual research shows it's a minor and beneficial upregulation. There is no research at all indicating that people with the minor allele are "not able to properly process sulfur."

    I have to call "quackery" on this one.
     

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