Professor & patients' paper on the solvable biological challenge of ME/CFS: reader-friendly version
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Supplements for energy?

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS Discussion' started by dead.money, Feb 12, 2015.

  1. dead.money

    dead.money

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    I'm beginning a strict slightly tweaked version of the freddd protocol and an anti-Candida diet and supplement regimen. I'm wondering what supplements I should add in for increased mental and physical energy. Obviously the b vitamins will help eventually, but I'm looking for something short term to get me through the start up. I'm thinking acetyl-l-cartenine for memory and focus/mental energy, and d-ribose for physical energy. Does anyone have any other recommendations? I'm also gonna be using plenty of omega 3.

    I hit a wall every day where I feel like I can't keep taking in information and like my mind is very tired from being stimulated. I'm a science major so it's to be expected, but my threshold is very very low. Sometimes I don't even want to watch a tv show because it feels like it will take too much mental energy to follow it. Can anyone relate to this and/or share what works for it?

    The other thing I get is constant tip of your tongue phenomenon and forgetting things seconds after they happen.

    Thanks,
    Dave
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2015
  2. Mij

    Mij Senior Member

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    @dead.money many of us benefit from taking CoQ10. I've been taking ubiquinol and noticea positive difference in post exertion energy levels. It's a matter of finding your right dosage.
     
    GoodVibesOnly likes this.
  3. drob31

    drob31 Senior Member

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    I've had luck with PQQ and NADH.
     
  4. minkeygirl

    minkeygirl But I Look So Good.

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    Nothing has ever helped me. The forgetting is a common problem. Just one of those things I live with.
     
  5. Alea Ishikawa

    Alea Ishikawa

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    You'll find a lot of people on the forums who can relate to that, myself included.



    Here's what I recommend considering:

    D-ribose: Might reduce body pain and increase energy. I'd suggest trying a "loading dose" of 5g 3x/day for 21 days then 5g 2x/day thereafter. (I haven't been able to complete this myself, but heard it can be useful.) D-ribose helps with ATP, essentially relieving your body of taking an extra step in the energy process.



    Excedrin Migraine: Basically a mix of acetaminophen and aspirin with caffeine. It might help reduce inflammation. Be warned that acetaminophen lowers gluathione in the brain and aspirin lowers intracellular glutathione.



    Caffeine: Dr. Myhill states caffeine helps with cyclic AMP. I take green or black tea sometimes to "front load" energy to help perform tasks for a certain period of time. However, I still need my regular rest periods. Taking it when low energy can result in a hindrance.

    I also don't recommend this for everyone! It is a vasoconstrictor and diuretic. It can cause fast heart rate and anxiety. Do not overdose. Expect the effects to last about 4-6 hrs.



    Vasopressor AND/OR Beta blocker: If you have orthostatic intolerance, this could be a game-changer.

    If you have low blood pressure, then a vasopressor can bring it up and help bring blood and oxygen to the brain. A beta blocker can slow down your heart rate to help prevent tachycardia when sitting and standing. Some people report an improved quality of life. It can be a mixed bag.

    For me, pseudoephedrine (the stuff in Sudafed) was a special little thing I stumbled upon, before I was officially diagnosed with POTS. It can double the amount of what I can do - again, provided I have my regular rest. Pseudoephedrine can cause fast heart rate, high blood pressure, and anxiety. If blood pressure is already high, it can make one feel awful and keep you awake for the run of the medication.




    Lay Down: CFS patients typically have low blood volume and decreased oxygen to the brain. According to Dr. Myhill, resting will restore blood flow, making functioning easier. So, give your blood a path of least resistance. I would suggest trying things - even watching TV - while laying down and see how you feel.

    In places where it's not practical to lay down, keep your legs elevated (around your hips in height) or at least one leg up when sitting. You might also try slouching or tilting your head to the side, but this could kill your posture over time/send the wrong message. You can also squat or kneel down - helps with tachycardia, too.




    Rest / Heart Rate Monitor: My CFS doc told me that taking rest periods during activities will increase the amount I can do. Some people use a heart rate monitor to see when they go over their estimated anaerobic threshold, where lactic acid starts building up and causing pain. (Stevens et al. found that CFS patients typically have a lower VO2max and reach anaerobic threshold earlier. So, a 39-year-old CFS patient might enter AT at 108 bpm, whereas a healthy person wouldn't enter it until about 143 bpm.)

    The formula is:
    Before the person reaches AT, they stop and rest until their heart rate lowers. And then they continue their activity. I must admit, however, that it takes a considerable amount of discipline to do forced rests.



    Diet / Allergens / Metal Detox / Chemicals: Anything that reduces the body burden might help you. Take an antihistamine and see if that does anything for you. (I don't suggest benedryl, as that might knock you out!) Some people find benefit via detox from methylation or chelation (i.e. Cutler protocol). Some people avoid mold, household chemicals, diary, gluten, etc.



    Acetyl-l-carnitine OR L-carnitine Fumarate:
    I found that LCF helped with the chest angina - essentially bringing more "oomph" to the heart. However, if it was sacrificing my brain power for heart power, then it wasn't worth it to me. I don't know if ALCAR did anything for my mental functioning, but may work for some.



    CFS patients typically have mitochondrial dysfunction. According to Dr. Myhill, the brain does not have a huge amount of mito's - so when you are low on energy, your brain will suffer. Until you can get rid of the mito dysfunction, you might always be dealing with the energy cap.
     
  6. dead.money

    dead.money

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    Thanks for all the input. I've had dizziness, weakness, and light headedness upon rising for 4 years now. I'm definitely going to look into a vasopressor. All stimulants give me extreme anxiety (I can't even have a cup of coffee), so I'll have to avoid the caffeine and pseudo. Definitely planning on getting some d ribose.
     
  7. SOC

    SOC

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    It sounds like you need a workup for all kinds of orthostatic intolerance (OI) by a dysautonomia specialist, NOT your average GP who knows diddly squat about the various forms. A vasopressor might not be the best, or even a wise, choice depending on what form of dysautonomia you have.
     
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  8. Alea Ishikawa

    Alea Ishikawa

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    I second what SOC said here. I would suggest getting a dysautonomia work-up - the beta blocker and/or vasopressor might follow depending on what you have.

    I only found pseudoephedrine worked by accident. I don't recommend it for everyone. I have POTS and sometimes low blood pressure, which is probably why it worked for me.

    If your blood pressure is normal-high, a vasopressor might have a noticeably negative effect on you instead of helping you.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2015
    SOC likes this.
  9. Little Bluestem

    Little Bluestem All Good Things Must Come to an End

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    Notice that s/he said "a positive difference in post exertion energy levels". Things like ubiquinol and ribose are not stimulants and do not make you feel more energetic. Some people think that they are not working because of this. However, when you do things, you will find that you have more energy (if they work for you).
     
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  10. dead.money

    dead.money

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    My psychiatrist just tried me on a beta blocker for anxiety and it made me worse (lack of focus, dizziness, more anxiety). I'll look into that testing and keep the info about d ribose in mind.
     
  11. Alea Ishikawa

    Alea Ishikawa

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    A note on regular d-ribose: don't use it if you have a corn allergy, as it is corn-derived. An alternative is Corvalen, which is not derived from corn.

    If you take regular d-ribose, avoid the NOW brand.

    Also, be sure to take d-ribose with or after a meal with carbohydrates. Although it does not raise blood sugar, it can cause your blood sugar to drop. The higher the dose, the greater the potential "sugar crash." It might help to have small amounts taken throughout the day instead of big scoopfuls. Use caution if diabetic.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2015
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  12. Alea Ishikawa

    Alea Ishikawa

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    A beta blocker can cause a drop in blood pressure as well as heart rate. It is sometimes paired with the vasopressor Midodrine and/or increased salt/water intake to compensate for low blood pressure and tachycardia.

    Also, is your blood pressure or heart rate already low?
     
  13. jason30

    jason30 Senior Member

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    The Netherlands
    CoQ10 and MSM powder gives me alot of energy.
     

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