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Sulforaphane in cruciferous vegetables

Discussion in 'Alternative Therapies' started by JuliaMaple, Jun 30, 2017.

  1. JuliaMaple

    JuliaMaple

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    Hey there everyone,
    I found some super interesting video's by Dr. Rhonda Patrick (American biochemist) and some of her area's of interest, including the effect of Sulforaphane in cruciferous vegetables. I am pretty sure some of you already know her, but just to be sure that it is not missed, I want to share some links to her youtube channel. She is one smart lady, and for ones that really enjoy diving deep into details, she is awesome to watch.

    I wanted to share, because I thought maybe some of us can benefit from the information she shares. Its packed full of medical terms and quite complicated, but the general idea is that a substance found in these vegetables, and especially broccoli (and even more in the sprouts of broccoli) can have a seriously positive effect on our health. Mostly on lowering the level of systemic inflammation. Which would be quite interesting to most of us here right? The inflammation in the body causes 'a lot' of health issues, so I think the level of inflammation most of us here experience has a dramaticly bad effect on how we feel and the health we try to create. Maybe, for some of us, it even 'causes' our health problems in general.
    I think that by lowering inflammation levels in the body, there is a possibility that people (and us too) have a good chance of truly becoming healthier and stronger.
    She gives some good tools/knowledge for that.

    I am going to introduce the broccoli sprouts into my diet for sure, I was curious about what others think about this subject. To me it makes a lot of sense.


    (if its too long you can skip some of it and go directly to the recap in the end. In the description of her video she writes where in the video you can find which subject, and also the recap.

    Another one that is about sulforaphane too:


    (there are many more video's, I just shared these are ones I could follow, but others are super interesting too).


    [​IMG]
     
    Ysabelle-S, ljimbo423, Hutan and 3 others like this.
  2. pattismith

    pattismith Senior Member

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    I introduced raw cruciferous to my diet a week ago, so I was wondering what effect I should expect from it (well i should have checked it before introducing, but I was supposing they can't be harmful)

    Together with the Sulphoraphane (isothiocyanates) that is anti cancerous, they bring Indoles that have anti estrogen effect that may be interesting to protect against Premenstrual syndrome, Breast cancer, and Lupus

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indole-3-carbinol

    However, some toxicity has been reported:

    http://www.iarc.fr/en/publications/pdfs-online/prev/handbook9/Handbook9_Cruciferous-Vegetables-7.pdf
     
    Hutan likes this.
  3. Basilico

    Basilico Florida

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    A few months ago, I put my husband on a protocol that was designed to calm down the NO/ONOO cycle based on various recommendations from the big CFS experts (Pall, Cheney, etc...)

    One of the things he took on this protocol was BroccoMax, which is a sulphoraphane extract that has much higher levels of sulphoraphane (20x higher, they claim). It's pretty cheap (about $7 on Amazon for Jarrow brand)

    According to Dr. Martin Pall, suphoraphane is a very potent antioxidant that protects against ROS (reactive oxygen species) damage.

    The result of the protocol was...inconclusive. His improvements were so mild that it could have just as easily been coincidence as due to the various supplements (including BroccoMax) he was taking. After stopping the supplements, he didn't get worse, so I think it's unlikely they made much of a difference.

    So, I don't think they are likely going to make a big difference for anyone, but they are a great antioxidant, so for that reason alone I think they aren't bad and might be worth a try.

    Here is a link to the site I was referencing earlier, which is a collection of info on various doctors' protocols for improving the NO/ONOO cycle: http://www.medicalinsider.com/cardiac3.html#pall
     
    pattismith likes this.
  4. Ysabelle-S

    Ysabelle-S Highly Vexatious

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    Thanks for posting those videos. I found them really interesting, especially if you listen to the whole lot. Though there's a lot to take in, so I might listen to them again.
     
  5. Eastman

    Eastman Senior Member

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    Little Bluestem likes this.

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