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"Studying the Shadows of Psychology"-on reporting of adverse effects associated w/ psychological tx

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Tom Kindlon, Aug 14, 2013.

  1. Tom Kindlon

    Tom Kindlon Senior Member

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    This is two pages long (excluding a page of images). It is not that heavy e.g. no numbers. It touches on some of the issues I brought up in my paper:


    Unfortunately the article then finishes by looking at one trial in particular, the PACE Trial, and making it out it clearly found CBT and GET were not more risky.

    I discussed the PACE Trial in particular in Section 6 of my paper, "PACE Trial – A model of excellence in harms reporting?"
     
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  2. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Logan, Queensland, Australia
    Much of the SBU publication looks interesting. I am reading more than just the shadows section.
     
  3. Bob

    Bob

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    How irritating. If writing an essay specifically on potential deterioration after psychological treatments, then at least present the facts correctly when presenting an example of 'good' practise!

    "But the results of the randomised trial indicated that none of the three complementary treatments increased the risk for deterioration or serious negative reactions."

    Perhaps I can agree that results for 'serious negative reactions' were published (although I seem to remember there being questions raised about the quality of these results), but the deterioration rates (as an equivalent measure to the improvement rates) have not been published. So the evidence is not available to say that the treatments did not increase the risk for 'deterioration'.
     
  4. Valentijn

    Valentijn Activity Level: 3

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    They divided the adverse events into serious and non-serious. Serious meant being hospitalized, dying, etc, and essentially everything else was "non-serious". Hence someone could have a major PEM episode and be completely disabled for weeks, yet it would be categorized right alongside with feeling a bit achy after exercise.
     
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  5. Tom Kindlon

    Tom Kindlon Senior Member

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    Thanks. I thought the first three sections were interesting enough and could be useful for people who want to learn about evidence-based therapies and how this reviews can be undertaken. The other articles were condition specific and I found them less interesting.
     
  6. Tom Kindlon

    Tom Kindlon Senior Member

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    Here's a somewhat related piece from the Swedish media this week:

    Original in Swedish: http://www.svt.se/nyheter/sverige/okanda-risker-med-terapi

    http://www.microsofttranslator.com/...t.se/nyheter/sverige/okanda-risker-med-terapi


     

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