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steroid hormones (incl. cortisol) affect gene expression!

Discussion in 'Genetic Testing and SNPs' started by Aileen, Nov 8, 2013.

  1. Aileen

    Aileen Senior Member

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    I am into the first week of 2 new genetics courses. In one, Genes and the Human Condition, they talked about how the steroid hormones enter the nucleus of the cell and can increase gene expression. So methylation is not the only thing that can turn genes on. Since so many of us have problems with cortisol, I wonder if, or how, that might tie into certain genes being expressed or not. Can't help wondering if there is a connection.

    There was also some interesting talk about how fruit flies have many homologous (similar) genes to us. The instructor went on to say that in fruit flies (drosophila) hundreds of disease associated genes have already been identified. All of a sudden I'm a lot more interested in drosophila!

    We are about to get into week 2 in Useful Genetics. I'm still busy repeatedly failing the practice quiz for week 1. :confused: The week 2 topics have to do with different mutations. One thing that has been mentioned already is that some mutations cancel each other out so a single mutation does not tell the whole story.

    These 2 courses are proving interesting and I haven't done any supplementary reading yet or looked at the course discussion forums.
     
  2. helen1

    helen1 Senior Member

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    Whenever you're up to it, I'd love to hear more!
     
  3. Aileen

    Aileen Senior Member

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    @helen1 I'll try to post some things that I learn that I've never heard of before or links they recommend. These courses are free and online if you are interested. Just click on the course names in my first post. The Useful Genetics course is from UBC. :nerd:
     
  4. helen1

    helen1 Senior Member

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    Thanks Aileen. I just signed up for Useful Genetics :)
     
  5. WoolPippi

    WoolPippi Senior Member

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    Very interesting!
    Dr.Gominak, a neurologist, is making a strong case that vitD is actually a hormone and not a vitamine. And a steroid hormone at that! Your sentence about them entering the nucleus is literally what she said.
    Dr Google seems to confirm this.

    You tying steroid hormones specifically to gene expression and our genome results makes me want to...to...express myself! I.e. run around and flail my arms for a bit. Then sit down and study.

    Just to summarize: correct vitD3 blood levels should be 60-80, no more, no less. D2 is for rats, not for humans (and is a vitamine indeed). She connects D3 levels to sleep where neurological repairs occur during deep sleep and REM (related to Human Growth Hormone and a perfect level of sleep paralysis. No snoring, no apneu, no sleeptalking, no getting up to pee.)
     
  6. *GG*

    *GG* Senior Member

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    I thought it was already well established that "vitamin D" is actually a hormone, not sure about the steroid thing. I have taking 5 to 10K IUs of Vitamin D now for about 4 years and have my blood levels checked regularly. I was over 100 at one point, but then cut back, and was below 50, if I recall correctly.

    GG
     

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