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Statistically Modelling the Relationships between Type D Personality...

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by Kati, Mar 22, 2016.

  1. Kati

    Kati Patient in training

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    FWIW



    Statistically Modelling the Relationships between Type D Personality and Social Support, Health Behaviors and Symptom Severity in Chronic Illness Groups

    Horwood S1, Anglim J1, Tooley G1.
    • 1a School of Psychology , Deakin University , 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood , 3125 Victoria , Australia.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26998656

    Abstract
    OBJECTIVE:
    The study aimed to develop a predictive model of how Type D personality influences health behaviors, social support, and symptom severity and assess its generalizability to a range of chronic illnesses.

    DESIGN:
    Participants were classified as either healthy (n = 182) or having a chronic illness (n = 207). Participants completed an online survey measuring Type D and a range of health-related variables. Chronic illness participants were classified as having either a functional somatic syndrome (i.e. chronic fatigue syndrome or fibromyalgia), where the underlying pathological processes were unclear, or illnesses such as type 2 diabetes, osteoarthritis, or rheumatoid arthritis, where the causes are well understood.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:
    Outcome measures were health behaviors, social support, and both physical and psychological symptoms.

    RESULTS:
    The rate of Type D was higher in chronic illness participants (53%) than in healthy controls (39%). Negative affectivity (NA) and social inhibition (SI) both correlated with outcome measures, although NA was generally the stronger predictor. Using NA and SI as independent subscales led to superior prediction of health outcomes than using categorical or continuous representations.

    CONCLUSION:
    Findings suggest that the relationship between Type D and health outcomes may generalize across different chronic illnesses.
     
  2. Kati

    Kati Patient in training

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    Type D personality, a concept used in the field of medical psychology, is defined as the joint tendency towards negative affectivity (e.g. worry, irritability, gloom) and social inhibition (e.g. reticence and a lack of self-assurance).The letter D stands for "distressed".

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Type_D_personality
     
  3. Old Bones

    Old Bones Senior Member

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    Seems ME patients can't win. We're either labelled "vexatious" for expressing our opinions and asking questions. Or, we're categorized as having a less-desirable personality type if we are reticent (remain silent). Damn right we're "distressed". To not be, considering the way we've been portrayed and mistreated for many years, would be abnormal.
     
  4. daisybell

    daisybell Senior Member

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  5. Asa

    Asa Senior Member

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    So, medical and societal abuse causes distress and harms people?

    Isn't this "study" like saying... We found that sick dogs that were kicked a lot were less likely to heal?
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2016
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  6. Asa

    Asa Senior Member

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    I just very superficially noticed that that wiki link lists Coyne JC as an author. Wonder what he would say about the above paper?
     
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  7. jimells

    jimells Senior Member

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    Oh. I assumed it stood for "Deadbeat".
     
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  8. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Hibernating

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    Beware of online surveys!

    So they failed to confirm their hypothesis and cherry picked their post-hoc model.

    Which by the way, was not statistically significant after correcting for multiple comparisons.

    They try to explain it with:

    But given that the only significant finding was those with chronic illnesses had higher scores, I'd say their speculations are just that.

    So another crap study (non-representitive convenience sample, no formal diagnosis etc.), with null results.
     
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  9. Asa

    Asa Senior Member

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    "So another crap study..." Should that be catagorized as a Type AC Study or simply Type C Study? :D
     
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  10. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Hibernating

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    The "another crap study" and "crap study" are the same group! No statistical difference!
     
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  11. user9876

    user9876 Senior Member

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    moderated with many others
    This was his twitter comment on the paper
     
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  12. Helencz

    Helencz

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    Omg, I am a psych prof & also statistician. I never even heard of type D personality! As for the sampling method-pathetic! As for the statistics, I have to read the entire paper but it doesn't look like statistical modeling (that is based on much more advanced methods, such as those quantitative doc students learn late in their studies ), but rather look pretty much 2nd semester stats, stuff that can be done in excel. Still, whatever the stat methods, the sampling technique is unacceptable. Don't believe most of what u read in journals, especially medical journals! Drs generally dislike variables because they vary. That's why they dislike syndromes
     
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  13. Helencz

    Helencz

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    Ps one of my docs used to quote me "EVERYTHING IS A SYNDROME," Even my dad's cancer. He and his friend had the same kind at the same time and the outcomes both vastly differed and were both opposite of what was expected (like they traded bodies). As my mentor said, the correct answer is always, "it depends!"
     
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  14. jimells

    jimells Senior Member

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    As a former computer programmer (my career was wrecked by the illness) I declare that I like variables because they vary :D
     
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