Invest in ME Conference 12: First Class in Every Way
OverTheHills wraps up our series of articles on this year's 12th Invest in ME International Conference (IIMEC12) in London with some reflections on her experience as a patient attending the conference for the first time.
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SSRI's May Worsen PTSD Symptoms.

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Ema, Sep 3, 2015.

  1. Ema

    Ema Senior Member

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  2. JaimeS

    JaimeS Senior Member

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    Hmm, I wonder what this implies about the memories of PWME - who are documented to have higher than usual levels of serotonin in the brain in general.

    -J
     
  3. Ema

    Ema Senior Member

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    Do you have a link to the research showing higher than usual serotonin levels?

    I thought there was still some uncertainty...and it was more about upregulated receptors than absolute serotonin levels.

    http://chronicfatigue.about.com/od/treatingfmscfs/a/serotonin.htm
     
  4. JaimeS

    JaimeS Senior Member

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    Definitely could be true for some of us, @Ema . I think that if we are making antibodies to serotonin (as about 2/3 of us seem to, according to the study cited below) then that could account for increased receptor sensitivity. But I know I've also seen studies that say that serotonin, while decreased in the blood, is increased in the CSF. (I can't find it, but maybe someone else remembers? If so, I will cite it below.) Blood serotonin doesn't really tell us much about uptake in the CNS. When I got my blood serotonin and urine serotonin measured, my doctor said that my urine serotonin was more indicative of the system's serotonin.

    In receptor sensitivity or overabundance in the brain, selective serotonin blockers may end up being helpful.

    Antibodies to serotonin:

    Maes, M., Ringel, K., Kubera, M., Anderson, G., Morris, G., Galecki, P., Geffard, M. (2013). In myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome, increased autoimmune activity against 5-HT is associated with immuno-inflammatory pathways and bacterial translocation. Journal of Affective Disorders, 150(2):223-30.

    Elevated serotonin in PWME in the CSF:

    ??? Does anyone else recall where this was?

    About 1/3 of PWME benefit from selective serotonin blockers:

    Späth, M., Welzel, D., Färber, L. (2000). Treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome with 5-HT3 receptor antagonists-- preliminary results. Scandanavian Journal of Rheumatology Supplemental, 113:72-7.

    Increased receptor sensitivity:

    Bakheit, A. M., Behan, P. O., Dinan, T. G., Gray, C. E., & O’Keane, V. (1992). Possible upregulation of hypothalamic 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors in patients with postviral fatigue syndrome. BMJ : British Medical Journal, 304(6833), 1010–1012.

    Cleare, A. J., Bearn, J., Allain, T., McGregor, S., Wessley, S., Murray, R.M., O'Keane, V. (1995). Contrasting neuroendocrine responses in depression and chronic fatigue syndrome. Journal of Affective Disorders. 34(4):283-9.

    Demitrack, M.A., Gold, P.W., Dale, J.K., Krahn, D.D., Kling, M.A., Straus, S.E. (1992). Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolism in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: preliminary findings. Biological psychiatry, 32(12):1065-77.

    Sharpe, M., Hawton, K., Clements, A., & Cowen, P. J. (1997). Increased brain serotonin function in men with chronic fatigue syndrome. BMJ : British Medical Journal, 315(7101), 164–165.

    On a personal note, when I was tested for serotonin, my blood serotonin was quite low; the urine was dead-center normal. My doc told me that what I had was not a serotonin imbalance (the neuro at Mayo) because the urine serotonin was a much more valid indicator of serotonin in the system.

    I've since wondered if low blood serotonin coupled with normal urine excretion implies a high level in the CNS. Unless I am peeing away my serotonin at a greater rate than I am producing it (!) and will eventually have zero serotonin (!!), logically that 'extra' serotonin must be somewhere.

    All hypotheses, of course...

    -J
     

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