1. Patients launch a $1.27 million crowdfunding campaign for ME/CFS gut microbiome study.
    Check out the website, Facebook and Twitter. Join in donate and spread the word!
Patient Experience: "What Bronllys taught me about pacing."
In 2012, Maya, who had tried to cope with ME/CFS on her own for many years, attended a pain management centre in Wales, U.K., and is now able to achieve more through pacing and acceptance, than she had been able to before the course...
Discuss the article on the Forums.

SPECT, PET, and CT, which brain scans reveal more?

Discussion in 'Diagnostic Guidelines and Laboratory Testing' started by amaru7, Aug 22, 2013.

  1. amaru7

    amaru7 Senior Member

    Messages:
    124
    Likes:
    65
    Europe
    Hi,

    I had EEG done and it didn't show what's wrong neurologically. Which one of the other tests has more of a diagnostic value to it and I should go for as long as my insurance covers it. To my knowledge now PET seems to be one of the more modern options, but is also very expensive, it shows metabolism, SPECT is as I understand for oxygen flow and CT I didn't read alot about yet, which one is most recommended if you had to chose? And also could that contrast radioactive stuff they inject do even more damage to health?
  2. amaru7

    amaru7 Senior Member

    Messages:
    124
    Likes:
    65
    Europe
    I'll answer myself PET probably is the better option but spect is also good and often does show brain pathology in CFS ME.
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2014
  3. WillowJ

    WillowJ Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,856
    Likes:
    2,204
    WA, USA
    I think it may be likely to be individual.

    Any of those tests have a potential to show something wrong in people like us (CT scan most unlikely: MRI, PET scan, EEG, and SPECT more likely), but it probably varies which test would show up something interesting. Also it may be that certain techniques are required (I don't know if anything special is needed in EEG).

    It also depends on who is reading the images. Some radiologists will sometimes miss something very significant, and some will miss something that is more unusual or more subtle, such as something that is out of place due to age (but might be "normal" in an older patient, such as the small spots we might have on MRI).

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page