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Specific correlations between muscle oxidative stress & CFS (hypothesis paper) (2007)

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by Dolphin, Aug 18, 2011.

  1. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    Another paper from the Italian muscle team which I found interesting but which doesn't seem to have got much coverage. And again, I probably won't be able to contribute much to the discussion.

  2. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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  3. richvank

    richvank Senior Member

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    Hi, Dolphin.

    Oxidative stress is perhaps the best substantiated biochemical feature of ME/CFS. I think there are probably a dozen or more studies now that confirm this. For what it's worth, I think the Glutathione Depletion--Methylation Cycle Block hypothesis accounts for this aspect very well.

    Best regards,

    Rich
  4. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    I'm out of my depth on these things but my general impression is that damage to muscle isn't specifically talked about in a lot of those papers in the way it is discussed by the Italian team.
  5. richvank

    richvank Senior Member

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    Hi, Dolphin.

    I agree. They've done some very detailed work. Looking at the whole body of ME/CFS research, I would say that there is evidence for glutathione depletion, and hence oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in the skeletal muscles, the heart muscle, the brain and nervous system, cells of the immune system, and some of the glands.

    The organs that have a complete transsulfuration pathway and can thus convert methionine to cysteine are able to keep their glutathione levels up fairly well when there is bodywide depletion of glutathione. These include the liver, the kidneys, the pancreas, the intestine, and the lenses of the eyes. The cells of the brain do have a complete transsulfuration pathway, but it runs much more slowly, so is not able to give as much protection as these others enjoy.

    Best regards,

    Rich

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