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Some concerns about homeopathy

Discussion in 'Alternative Therapies' started by Esther12, Sep 9, 2017.

  1. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Lots of our treatments, including ME treatments, and including everyday medical care, are scientifically plausible. That is not the same as proven or reliable. We go to medical authorities and hope they can help. In the case of ME they usually don't.

    There is a guesstimate that half of all medicine is wrong, and even more of psychiatry. Science is a method, not a destination.

    The way I consider it is that these things are working hypotheses, including my CFS diagnosis and ME diagnosis. Whether we do it ourselves, or under medical advice, we are basically the test subjects in ongoing experiments. With something as complex as ME these treatments usually fail, or fail over time.
     
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  2. TiredSam

    TiredSam The wise nematode hibernates

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    I'm currently reading "Thinking Fast and Slow" by Daniel Kahneman (yes I know, I've been on it for ages ...). He says that the key factor in whether someone will create / adopot / hold onto a belief is whether it is plausible. That trumps everything - evidence, reason, facts, everything. Our problem is that M.E. isn't very plausible.
     
  3. Marky90

    Marky90 Science breeds knowledge, opinion breeds ignorance

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    We can allow our bodies to heal from ME

    I also fly to the moon every sunday morning
     
  4. Mrs Sowester

    Mrs Sowester Senior Member

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    But somehow homeopathy is plausible.
    It comes down to what it suits people to believe.

    So far today I have chosen to believe @Marky90 can fly. He can fly highest when he sings R Kelly songs.

    I slept well last night after two nights of awful broken sleep. I have chosen to believe that the quiche I ate for supper had magic soporific qualities and the previous nights of bad sleep had nothing to do with drinking Cava.
     
  5. arewenearlythereyet

    arewenearlythereyet Senior Member

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    Well my immediate response to @Marky90 s claim was belief then through reasoned logic I decided that this has become implausible ....mainly because if it were true I don't think he would restrict travel to just Sunday
     
  6. AndyPR

    AndyPR Senior Member

    Ahh, but what you have done there is dilute the Cava with sufficient amounts of quiche, so that it now allows you to sleep. ;)
     
  7. Joh

    Joh Inactivist

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    While he's allowing himself to heal from ME, he still has to be a little careful with PEM. Also on Sundays most shops are closed on earth.
     
  8. brenda

    brenda Senior Member

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    It is implausible that the Royal family, many medical doctors in Germany, and a very large percentage of the population, many veterinary surgeons and their patient's owners, believe that homeopathy works if it doesn't.
     
  9. Mrs Sowester

    Mrs Sowester Senior Member

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    No, it is entirely plausible by reason that 49.9% of the population is below average intelligence.
     
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  10. Valentijn

    Valentijn Senior Member

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    You're still appealing to authority. If it works, then there should be some evidence of that, not just the repetition of a logical fallacy.
     
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  11. AndyPR

    AndyPR Senior Member

    It is entirely plausible that the vast majority of scientists, many medical doctors worldwide, and a very large percentage of the population, don't believe that homeopathy works because it doesn't.
     
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  12. brenda

    brenda Senior Member

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    Oh if you mean doctors then I agree.
     
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  13. Joh

    Joh Inactivist

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    It's also implausible that the Royal family, many medical doctors in Germany, and a very large percentage of the population, many veterinary surgeons and their patient's owners believe that ME doesn't exist if it does.
     
  14. TiredSam

    TiredSam The wise nematode hibernates

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    :jaw-drop: That's the last time I try to be sarcastic.
     
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  15. Cheshire

    Cheshire Senior Member

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    As the majority of doctors do not believe homeopathy works, then followig your reasonning, homeopathy doesn't work. (and following your reasonning, ME is a psychiatric disorder).
     
  16. Valentijn

    Valentijn Senior Member

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    Okay, now we know you're fibbing! You'll give up the chocolate biscuits before you abandon sarcasm :D
     
  17. A.B.

    A.B. Senior Member

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    This is a poor argument as it's easy to come up with historical examples of widespread beliefs that were clearly wrong. Without a doubt, many people can share a belief that is incorrect.
     
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  18. arewenearlythereyet

    arewenearlythereyet Senior Member

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    What is going on with you at the moment? ...are you trying a personality transplant? if you are using the gut biome technique I think you should know that research is at a very early stage so the chances of it working and giving a permanent benefit are quite slim :D
     
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  19. arewenearlythereyet

    arewenearlythereyet Senior Member

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    I'm not sure which member of the royal family subscribe to this ...presumably prince Charles since he seems to have a lot of alternative views, but why does that give a ringing endorsement?

    The royals are just human beings that are prone to the power of suggestion like any body else?

    In fact I would suggest (pun intended) that they may be more susceptible since they live an otherworldly non practical and cosseted life. They are also into tradition a lot so may like the idea of upholding some more outdated views on things. I think they still uphold some mediaeval practices to this day.
     
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  20. Sea

    Sea Senior Member

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    From the link you gave:

    "After an in-depth initial consultation, Wendy prescribed two homeopathic remedies plus a probiotic supplement and a change of diet."

    "Wendy suggested a new diet (which he absolutely loves!) and a course of two different homoeopathic tablets."

    There is also the distinct possibility in this unregulated field that what you were given was not what it was claimed to be. Although there is literally nothing in true homeopathic remedies, there have been cases where bottles have been tested and found to contain all manner of substances.
     

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