Phoenix Rising: The Gift That Keeps on Giving All Year Long
This holiday season Jody Smith turns her eyes to the people of Phoenix Rising and gives thanks for you all ...
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Skin sensitivity

Discussion in 'General Treatment' started by SickOfSickness, Jun 16, 2012.

  1. SickOfSickness

    SickOfSickness Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,309
    Likes:
    2,243
    US
    Does anyone know supplements that can reduce sensitivity to touch? Things feel ticklish or uncomfortable and I am sure they shouldn't feel this bad. I seem to be increasing sensitivity and being bothered by it, and I was already too sensitive.
     
  2. Mark

    Mark Former CEO

    Messages:
    5,224
    Likes:
    6,197
    Sofa, UK
    There are a few threads about this, somewhere, perhaps in the Symptoms forum, though it would be difficult to track down - search on 'itching' might find some. I've posted on those threads in the past; to sum up my suggestions it has helped me to focus on identifying and avoiding everything I'm sensitive to: food sensitivities and in particular what clothes I'm wearing. Very hard to identify because it takes quite a while for my sensitivity to build up and even longer to subside when the trigger is removed. But clothes can be crucial, and one golden rule that works for me is that the level of sensitivity is a consequence of the exposure: the longer I'm exposed to something that's setting me off, the greater the overall level of sensitivity to everything becomes. Only real solution I've found is identifying and removing the thing(s) that are causing the increased sensitivity, and paying attention to this all the time.
     
  3. SickOfSickness

    SickOfSickness Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,309
    Likes:
    2,243
    US
    It's the parts of bare skin, not touching clothes, that bother me. I feel like if I could cover all my skin it would help a little, but that is too inconvenient to cover neck and wear long sleeves and gloves. And my face would still be exposed. It's not itchy, just sensitive. I hope it's not diet related. I already eliminated most foods from my diet. I wonder if it is influenced by household mold and toxins, pollen allergies, or cleaning chemicals.
     
  4. Calathea

    Calathea Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,246
    Likes:
    784
    Antihistamines? I've been diagnosed with dermographism, which may be worth looking into. Check that you're using the mildest possible soap and laundry detergent, too.
     
  5. Mark

    Mark Former CEO

    Messages:
    5,224
    Likes:
    6,197
    Sofa, UK
    Could well be any of those environmental sensitivities. An air filter made a big difference for me. But I'll caution that the effect I have with clothes (and also the sofa or bedding I'm sitting on) is not as simple as feeling the effect at the point of contact. Right now my face is itching, and from experience I'm fairly sure that's a result of having the keyboard on my lap, some dust on the sofa, and/or the clothes I'm wearing. All of those things increase my sensitivity in general, and they are the underlying cause of the itching on other parts of my body. And anti-histimines have no effect at all for me, because this sensitivity is not a regular allergic response.
     
  6. SickOfSickness

    SickOfSickness Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,309
    Likes:
    2,243
    US
    Ok, so it might be worse because of my clothing. Yes, I need to get my other air filter running. I take a daily antihistamine.
     
  7. Calathea

    Calathea Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,246
    Likes:
    784
    Is the antihistamine strong enough for you? I had to be switched to a stronger one.
     
  8. SickOfSickness

    SickOfSickness Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,309
    Likes:
    2,243
    US
    I would take a stronger one if I could. I take one Zyrtec is all. I prefer one Allegra but Zyrtec is not much worse.
     
  9. taniaaust1

    taniaaust1 Senior Member

    Messages:
    11,916
    Likes:
    12,775
    Sth Australia
    I sympathise.. I had a lot of skin sensitivity (not at all itching.... itching came far later in my illness long after the skin sensitivity had stopped). There wasnt anything I found to help the skin sensitivity (itching thou is another story.. I found these two things to be two completely different things.. the sensitivity was like something neurological going on).

    My skin sensitivity in the end got to the point where the pressure of the sheets on my bed hurt me.
     
  10. Calathea

    Calathea Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,246
    Likes:
    784
    Zyrtec was the one I was on before as well. They've got me on Atarax at the moment. It's hard to tell, but I think it helps a little more, and I seem to sleep a little better on it as well. It's one of the older anti-histamines.

    Did you look up dermographism, by the way? Apparently with that, some people end up on two types of antihistamines at once. I'm booked to see the dermatologist soon, so I'll ask about that. Not everyone does well on antihistamines, though, some people prefer other options.
     
  11. SickOfSickness

    SickOfSickness Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,309
    Likes:
    2,243
    US
    I asked my allergist for something stronger than Zyrtec or Allegra, and he shrugged like there wasn't anything.

    My sensitivity seems increased because of recent supplements I added. I started B Complex with metafolin, methyl B12, and some others before that.

    I don't think I have dermographism. If I scratch myself it's not raised.
     
  12. Calathea

    Calathea Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,246
    Likes:
    784
    It's not raised for me either, but it goes very pink. Apparently it's not meant to. I have no idea, I thought it was normal until the dermatologist diagnosed me. I think the condition is caused by excessive histamine in the body. Either way, could you perhaps see a dermatologist rather than an allergist?
     
  13. taniaaust1

    taniaaust1 Senior Member

    Messages:
    11,916
    Likes:
    12,775
    Sth Australia
    I have had dermographism at times.. you cant miss it when its happening... anything which touches your skin can be leaving marks. Only very lightly stoking a finger nail up the arm will leave a big red mark (and in worst causes like a welt).
    ...........

    Have you tried cutting back on your supplements to see if it calms down.
     
  14. Emootje

    Emootje Senior Member

    Messages:
    346
    Likes:
    234
    The Netherlands
    It sounds like allodynia, unfortunately I don't know any supplements that can reduce the sensitivity to touch.
     
  15. SickOfSickness

    SickOfSickness Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,309
    Likes:
    2,243
    US
    I just started methylation and want to continue if I can.

    Maybe so. Wiki says Naproxen is used. I would try that if I could find the naproxen. I'll look.
     
  16. xks201

    xks201 Senior Member

    Messages:
    713
    Likes:
    292
    This guy has devoted his life's work to mast cells which produce histamine. There are studies showing CFIDS or FM patients have increased concentration of mast cells and histamine. I have no doubt that when my symptoms of CFS flare up it is due to a release of histamine. http://www.mastcellmaster.com/

    I recommend getting something done like an amino acid panel so you can possibly see what your body is doing to generate so much histamine. I have tried the band aid approach of patching the neurotransmitter system with prescription drugs to alleviate the hyperactivity associated with these rushes of histamine I get but that has done absolutely nothing for me. Specific amino acid and or vitamin therapy ironically is probably the best approach to this problem - which you can't tell what you need until you are tested. I used this to interpret my amino acid results. http://www.metametrix.com/files/test-menu/interpretive-guides/amino-acids-ig.pdf
     
  17. Calathea

    Calathea Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,246
    Likes:
    784
    Specific amino acid profile tests aren't always an option, you know. I certainly know of no way in which I could access them, I'm broke and working with the NHS and I don't believe they do that.

    I'm getting referred to dermatology again, and when I see the specialist I want to get my mast cells checked, as people here have mentioned mastocytosis to me as a possibility a few times (brown lesions on my skin etc.). Does anyone know the best way to raise this without making the specialist think you're one of those annoying patients who wants to diagnose themselves?
     
  18. SickOfSickness

    SickOfSickness Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,309
    Likes:
    2,243
    US
    IMO say someone told you to ask about mastocytosis and the test. So it doesn't sound like you found it yourself. And don't seem like you looked it up.
     

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page