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Shmt1 recommendations?

Discussion in 'Genetic Testing and SNPs' started by Wards, Jul 24, 2013.

  1. Wards

    Wards

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    Hello, just plugged my 23andme results in and the only mutations I have are 677ct and shmt1 (+/+). I've never really felt like I have any kind of Cfs or other illness so that's not really what brought me here. Looking more for preventative steps to keep things running smoothly, but there is hardly anything solid on shmt1 (+/+). I have read that it enhances the effect of 677ct though? Thanks for any help.
  2. Valentijn

    Valentijn Activity Level: 3

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    Amersfoort, Netherlands
    Methylfolate needed, maybe folinic acid too :D A normal dose is probably sufficient.
  3. Wards

    Wards

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    Thank you Valentijn. I will look into both of those.
  4. Bluebell

    Bluebell More % Neanderthal than Adreno but less hairy :-D

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    Wards, are you are heterozygous for C677T, with 1 c and 1 t? Whether you are hetero or homo for it, it's something to look into. I just read a post on Ben Lynch's site where he says it upsets him when experts say that being heterozygous for these MTHFR mutations doesn't matter - he says it does matter and does affect the health. His site is: www.mthfr.net.

    You may want to avoid taking supplements that have artificial folic acid in them, and maybe even avoid foods that are fortified with artificial folic acid (which is difficult in the US). Doing so has made a difference to me (I have both C677T and A1298C heterozygous).

    "The 677T variant is most commonly associated with early heart disease and stroke and the 1298C variant with a variety chronic illnesses, but either anomaly can cause a wide variety of health problems. The MTHFR anomaly is reported out as heterozygous or homozygous. If you are heterozygous that means you have one affected gene and one normal gene. The MTHFR enzyme will run at about 55% to 70% efficiency compared to a normal MTHFR enzyme.
    If you are homozygous then enzyme efficiency drops down to 7% to 10% of normal, which of course makes a huge difference. The worst combination is 677T/1298C in which you are heterozygous to both anomalies. Many chronic illnesses are linked to this anomaly. 98% of autistic children have an MTHFR anomaly. Fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, migraines, are all conditions associated with MTHFR anomaly. We have also rarely seen patients homozygous with 677T and heterozygous 1298C, but this is very rare.
    MTHFR can make you susceptible to illness because the pathway is the primary source of glutathione production in the body. Glutathione is the body's primary antioxidant and detoxifier. People with MTHFR anomalies usually have low glutathione, which makes them more susceptible to stress and less tolerant to toxins. As we age MTHFR problems get much worse due to the accumulation of toxins and the cumulative effect of oxidative stress, which ages our bodies." http://www.nwhealthcare.net/index.php?id=64

    Lots of informational links are listed in this thread (scroll to the bottom for the newest list): http://forums.phoenixrising.me/inde...tional-links-about-methylation-and-b12.23974/
    Valentijn likes this.
  5. Wards

    Wards

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    Hi Bluebell. I am heterozygous for the 677 snp. I think the difficult part for me to wrap my head around is that I am only 26 and am and always have been and felt healthy. I only stumbled upon this because of 23andme. I mean, if I don't feel I'll or anything, do I need to worry about these things?
  6. Bluebell

    Bluebell More % Neanderthal than Adreno but less hairy :-D

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    Wards, I'm not a healthcare practitioner, I'm just an ordinary person, so I can only tell you what I think.

    I think you should consider yourself fortunate that you have found out about your genetics so early in life.

    I am old enough to be your mom, and I just found out about my genetics, and I only looked into them because I've had a difficult time with my health and I became suspicious that I might have MTHFR mutations (as it turns out, I was on the right track about that).

    I always had some health issues, but was pretty much getting along okay until my mid-30s. It's not unusual that you feel pretty healthy at 26. As a person gets older, the effects of many of these genetic mutations add up, and things can get more serious.

    Because you know now some things to watch out for, in case you develop them, and you can learn about preventative steps to take (in terms of nutrition, supplements, lifestyle, etc.), you are ahead of the game.

    For an example, earlier this year I had some sudden damage to my optic nerves and my vision which can't be fixed in any way by medicine or surgery, and which cannot be corrected with glasses because it took place between my brain and my eye, not within my eyeball. I think this damage was due to Vitamin B12/Folate problems that have harmed my body in various ways. I was taking enough of B12 and Folic Acid in supplement form -- I have taken a good array of vitamins/minerals for over 20 years -- but I was taking the artificial kinds of B12 and Folate (not knowing there were any other kinds available, because this issue is not publicized at all) and they just cannot be used by my body. It's also possible that this optic neuritis might indicate that in a few years down the road, I will be diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (for a woman of my age and background, having one episode of optic neuritis is linked with a 75% chance of receiving a later diagnosis of MS). I think that defects in the methylation system may be quite relevant for multiple sclerosis (including vitamin D issues).

    As another example, I did some blood tests a few weeks ago and one came up really high for cancer. In 1 week I will do a re-test to make sure it wasn't a false reading, but if it's the same result or higher, the probability is only 2% that it's not cancer in some form. There is a chance that not having enough usable folate/B12 and other limitations in my methylation system have contributed to that developing.

    I would say that you don't need to have any anxiety at all about your genetic profile, but yes, you should "worry" about it, in the sense of taking it seriously, learning about it, and taking steps to ensure you are as healthy as you can be as you get older.

    Another issue that you will want to look into is how your C677T mutation might affect any children that you might have later. I know that in women, some MTHFR mutations can have some serious effects on their ability to get pregnant, to carry the baby to full term, and to have a healthy baby. Also, MTHFR mutations are strongly related to childhood autism. I do not know how the MTHFR mutations affect men and their chances of having healthy babies, but if one day you are in the mode of "trying to conceive", I expect that your MTHFR mutation will be something to discuss with your doctor or your wife's doctor, just to make sure that nutritional and other precautions are taken for the health of the baby.

    When I was around your age, it was inconceivable that the average person would be able to know so much about his/her genetics, even at the cost of a million dollars!, as we can now for $99. Research and knowledge have surged ahead rapidly. This is all to your advantage.

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