Phoenix Rising supports the Millions Missing global day of protest
Phoenix Rising is delighted to support the demands being made in the ME/CFS community’s first-ever global day of protest …
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Sequential Amalgam Removal

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS Discussion' started by JHDS, Dec 11, 2014.

  1. JHDS

    JHDS

    Messages:
    4
    Likes:
    0
    Los Angeles, California
    Hello all,

    I've recently been going to an IAOMT trained dentist to attend to my 6 amalgam fillings and one root canal. In the past 3 months I've had 2 of my amalgam fillings replaced with bio-compatible materials (as shown by a Clifford blood test). Each replacement has left me somewhat drained, but I seem to recover just fine after about a week.

    My strategy has been to follow a glutathione-boosting supplement regimen while slowly replacing each amalgam filling once every 6-8 weeks. Basically, I've been using, "Dental Mercury Detox," by Sam Ziff et al. to guide me in the process.

    However, I've recently been unnerved by my research into the Hal Huggins protocol which stresses the importance of sequential removal, as dictated by electrical readings, and doing so within 30 days time. In fact, he claims that not doing so can prevent full physical healing, or even worsen existing conditions.

    As you can imagine, the idea that I might have bungled my chance for healing from this dental madness has added much more stress to my already anxiety-ridden state.

    In the book I mentioned above, Ziff makes the following claim AGAINST the validity of sequential removal:

    "One question related to amalgam replacement that we get a great number of calls on deals with a protocol called "sequential removal." Sequential removal requires the dentist to measure and chart the electrical current of each filling and to remove/and or replace the amalgam fillings based or the charted information, starting with the highest negative readings first. There is no scientific data to support the use of sequential removal. Additionally, there is absolutely no scientific data to support the statements being made by the proponents of sequential removal that "if your dentist doesn't use sequential removal it will cause the mercury to be locked into the tissues." It has been well established scientifically that precise measurement of these electrical currents or comparison of the electrical currents emanating from various amalgams is not possible. Amalgam is an unstable material to start with and measurements are of specific points on the filling, not the entire filling. Therefore, they cannot be compared to each other.

    Read more here.

    Also, this morning I spoke with Dr. Blanche Grube, considered to be Hal Huggins's protege, and explained to her my situation. I explicitly asked if by having replaced 2 of my amalgam fillings "out of order," have I done any irreversible damage or prevented a full physical recovery, to which she replied, "No." Of course it was a qualified "no," so long as I complete the rest of my process per the Huggins protocol.

    So to wrap up...I'd love to hear your thoughts on all of this. Am I better of taking it slow and adhering to my current strategy? Should I switch over to the Huggins protocol? Am I damned for not having followed the Huggins protocol from the outset? Is sequential removal truly necessary to facilitate optimal healing? Any input would be greatly appreciated!!!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 11, 2014
  2. minkeygirl

    minkeygirl But I Look So Good.

    Messages:
    4,678
    Likes:
    4,647
    Left Coast
    I'm sorry I can't read all of this but I've never heard about the sequential removal. I had mine removed I think it was 2007 or 2009 over the course of a few appointments.

    I never used anyone's protocol. I took lots of chlorella before, during and after removal and I had some C IV's.

    I found it made zero difference in how I felt.

    Anyway, you started so you can't undo it. Just keep going, get them out and go from there.
     
  3. JHDS

    JHDS

    Messages:
    4
    Likes:
    0
    Los Angeles, California
    Thank you for the reply, @minkeygirl ! When you say that you found it made zero difference in how you felt, are you referring to the amalgam replacement in general?
     
  4. minkeygirl

    minkeygirl But I Look So Good.

    Messages:
    4,678
    Likes:
    4,647
    Left Coast
    Removing my amalgams made zero difference that I could tell. I didn't feel better, had no more energy. Nothing noticeable.

    I also had DMPS chelation after and that did not help with energy. It did help with MCS and equilibrium.
     
    Mij likes this.
  5. drob31

    drob31 Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,243
    Likes:
    724
    Do think it's possible amalgams could be the sole cause of certain instances of CFS, or adrenal fatigue?

    I know they certainly don't help things and it's a great idea to eliminate them.
     
  6. Martial

    Martial Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,342
    Likes:
    1,178
    Ventura, CA
    Well better out of the system then in, even if its not the cause of someones symptoms. A higher meavy metal load is not exactly conductive to healing either way.
     
  7. *GG*

    *GG* Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,139
    Likes:
    4,734
    Concord, NH
    I had my amalgams removed by an everyday dentist, not a biological one etc.. I just had him use a dental dam, and I would take a few grams of vitamin C before removal. I would also continue with my prescription of Cholestryamine and chlorella, I didn't notice a dramatic decline in my health.

    GG
     
  8. pemone

    pemone Senior Member

    Messages:
    423
    Likes:
    191
    JHDS, why not just have the amalgams replaced within 30 days? What's the reason stopping that? It's silly to extend that out. You are delaying chelation, and that is what is going to start to clear mercury from the body.

    The key things the dentist MUST do to be safe:
    1) Allow you to breathe oxygen through the nose, to avoid vapors from drilling.
    2) Use a HEPA filter near the mouth, so that excess vapors are immediately taken out of circulation.
    3) Use water on the drill, to reduce temperature of the drilling
    4) Use a dental dam

    My advice to you would be on any molar or key biting surface, use an inlay, NOT a composite filling. It makes a huge difference in the function of the tooth. Composite fillings in a key molar will need replacement in five years and will constantly be worn down by chewing. Inlays are expensive, but worth it.

    Be careful on glutathione. It will promote thiols, which stir up the mercury and can make symptoms worse not better. Dr Andrew Cutler - who has written two books on mercury detox - makes clear that the research does not show supplemental glutathione does anything to increase mercury disposal from the body. It may just end up moving the mercury around and causing worse symptoms. Eventually after sufficient detox you should be able to supplement glutathione without symptoms. Cutler's books will give you the supplements you need to be taking. Zinc is key. Vitamin B6 is usually important. I'm on a boatload of support supplements now trying to work through the chelation protocol issues.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2014
  9. JHDS

    JHDS

    Messages:
    4
    Likes:
    0
    Los Angeles, California
    Thank you all for your responses. I very much appreciate it.

    @pone I actually have two reasons. First, based the research I've done, it was recommended to do them one at a time with at least a month or two in between each replacement, so as to not create any type of "healing crisis." Second, it makes it much easier on me financially, which prevents any undue stress, which is the last thing I feel my body needs in this process.

    And great call on the inlay suggestion. The two teeth I've done thus far have been on molars, and for both I've had them replaced with biocompatible inlays/onlays (IPS e.Max) and am extremely happy with the results.

    I've stopped the glutathione supplementation and already I feel like I'm feeling a bit better. I do think they were simply causing a stir up of mercury.
     
  10. pemone

    pemone Senior Member

    Messages:
    423
    Likes:
    191
    I did a test. I had a single amalgam replaced and looked for symptoms. In my case, what I observed after each removal was that I get ill the night of the procedure. I get an intense acidity throughout my body and in my brain. But it goes away quickly and I have no real crisis. Based on that I had them remove one every week until they were all out.

    Ask your dentist if they can support a payment plan. They might allow you to get them all out within a month and then agree to let you pay over six months.

    As I learn more, what I might have done differently was to have used a binder before and during the time the amalgams were coming out, to at least tie up any mercury in saliva I was swallowing and make sure it gets out of the body. In addition, I would probably put some N Acetyl Cysteine into a drink and then use that as a mouthwash after the procedure, to clean up any superficial mercury on the gums. I would SPIT OUT the rinsate, as it would be loaded with mercury (see my other posts).

    But, I did none of that and came through just fine. If you have a good dentist who observes the important parts of the best practices, you will be okay.

    It's hard enough to get mercury out safely when your amalgams are removed. I don't need the stress of having amalgams still there and having to dance around that.
     
    JHDS likes this.
  11. Ian

    Ian Senior Member

    Messages:
    276
    Likes:
    216
    Amalgam removal (by a normal dentist) can result in levels of mercury spiking for up to a year. This is why it's such a disaster when a sick person finds out amalgam is bad and they go to a regular dentist for removal. So it might make some sense to have them removed a few at a time, rather than all in 1 go, because even if safety precautions are followed, rubber damn etc there is still some exposure.

    You will probably get more of a health benefit from a removal of root canal teeth. I took my gf to an IAOMT dentist to get a pre molar in her maxilla out. It had abscessed and dentists wanted to save it with a root canal. She has had an irregular heart beat and other health problems all year. Doctors put her on a bunch of pills, including anti-depressants, because apparently heart problems are caused by stress? The pills didn't help at all. Anyway she had the tooth removed, along with all the mushy bone that was residing around it. 10 days later her heart problems went, never to return.
     
    JHDS likes this.
  12. pemone

    pemone Senior Member

    Messages:
    423
    Likes:
    191
    Taking one or two amalgams out at a time is good practice. Start with the small amalgams so you can test reactions.

    That's an amazing story. Have you heard any theory about why an infected root canal tooth should affect heartbeat?
     
  13. Ian

    Ian Senior Member

    Messages:
    276
    Likes:
    216
    Probably bacteria (or their metabolic waste) from the infection were circulating in her blood and ending up in a place where they could effect her heart. This is generally what happens with a focal infection, but replace heart with any other potential organ where those bacteria can happily grow.
     
  14. JHDS

    JHDS

    Messages:
    4
    Likes:
    0
    Los Angeles, California
    Yeah, that's pretty much how I approached the situation. My dentist is an "accredited" IAOMT dentist, which is the highest level of membership. So while in large part I'm sure that all that really means is that they pay their annual dues, it also entails certain educational requirements. He's actually very reputable in the Los Angeles county so if anyone is looking for a good biological dentist, check out Dr. Chester Yokoyama.

    I'm actually considering doing this before I proceed with my remaining amalgams. It's my second molar on the bottom left side that has the root canal. And indeed, my dentist has recommended I have it extracted due to a perceived abscess at the root, which he diagnosed by way of a dark halo that he noticed on my x-ray.

    If you don't mind me asking, what were her "other" health problems? Did it involve CFS symptoms by any chance? Did she have it replaced with an implant or bridge? My dentist is recommending that I either replace it with a zirconium implant, or leave the space alone and simply use a night guard to help prevent any long-term shifting.

    Also, I've read some of your other posts before and if I'm not mistaken you had a similar story in which, once you resolved your root canals/cavitations, you were able to return to full health. So I'm hopeful that removal of this root canal will help to improve my CFS symptoms!
     
  15. Ian

    Ian Senior Member

    Messages:
    276
    Likes:
    216
    Not officially diagnosed but yes. She had it it replaced with nothing, it was a pre-molar, a pretty small tooth.

    If your dentist wants to give you an implant, ask him or her what stops bacteria travelling from your mouth down the side of the implant directly into your bone. Natural teeth are suspended by a membrane of ligaments, which also acts as a bacterial seal for the bone. In fact infection from implants, is so common dentists invented a whole new word to describe it, peri-Implantitis which can result in an enormous amount of bone destruction.
     
    MNC likes this.
  16. pemone

    pemone Senior Member

    Messages:
    423
    Likes:
    191
    Interesting. So if new science succeeds in growing a tooth in a lab that is made from your DNA and is your actual bone material, would this imply that such a tooth after implanting would still get infected at the gums, because of the lag of the ligaments?
     
  17. Ian

    Ian Senior Member

    Messages:
    276
    Likes:
    216
    I think the science for that is some way off anyway. Personally I don't think there are any perfect solutions to missing teeth. Everything is a compromise.
     
  18. pemone

    pemone Senior Member

    Messages:
    423
    Likes:
    191
    I don't think it is as far off as you believe. 3D printing gives a perfect solution for shaping the material. I think they can already in the lab get your own bone material to generate using recombinant techniques. It's all about how to make it affordable, and insurance isn't going to pay for $20K teeth.
     

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page