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Second code "hiding" in DNA discovered.

Discussion in 'Genetic Testing and SNPs' started by PeterPositive, Dec 28, 2013.

  1. PeterPositive

    PeterPositive Senior Member

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    Hi,
    since we discuss a lot of genetic-related subjects, I thought it might be appropriate to post a reference to this article: http://www.washington.edu/news/2013/12/12/scientists-discover-double-meaning-in-genetic-code/

    which reports about new interesting discoveries about the DNA. The picture gets even more complex than what it already is, but it also opens new possibilities to learn about how we can cure diseases that at the moment are not yet understood.

    cheers
  2. barbc56

    barbc56 Senior Member

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    I only had time read part of this article but it looks fascinating and have bookmarked it. Thanks!!

    This is why I have concerns about putting too much faith in the genetic tests you can order online. They really don't tell us much as this branch of science is still in it's infancy.

    If his colleagues can pronounce the name Stamatoyannopoulos, there is hope that this team of scientist can break the genetic code.:)

    Sorry, that joke was ripe for the picking. No offense to people who have complicated names that are hard to pronounce. My first and last name that are difficult to pronounce so hope I didn't offend anyone.
    SickOfSickness likes this.
  3. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    I think this is the second time this was posted. I will read the links, but the ENCODE project itself is has criticism (I blogged about this) for redefining terms in unusual ways that can mislead.

    http://forums.phoenixrising.me/index.php?entries/the-zombie-age-part-b.1334/

    I do suspect there is nothing new here, but I will comment further. What I think might be the case is that science that was under-recognized is now becoming mainstream.

    PS The actual papers in Science (study and commentary) are paywalled.
    Valentijn likes this.
  4. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    The article is not explicit enough to be sure, but this does not appear to be revolutionary, but rather evolutionary in that it involves an extension of what was already known or easily predicted from known science. The article appears to have problems, because aside from "duons" I have read all this before over a decade ago, aside from the ENCODE bit. (ENCODE itself only commenced about ten years ago.)

    It is known that genetic testing can only give risk factors not certainty. ENCODE is helping (presuming its accurate) to determine more about why that is. If the duon idea pans out then it may help us by giving us an additional layer of explanation and understanding about disease. However duons will be visible under both snp and full sequence testing.

    Full genome testing today comes in two forms. The first is complete sequencing, the second is snp identification. snp identification can only find known snps based on their library, and can only give known interpretations, and this will vary company by company and over time. However much of that snp data is useful if you have a genetic disorder based on those snps, its just that the science is changing rapidly and what we are told today might not be what we are told five years from now.

    Full genome sequencing is better, but still flawed, quite aside from the issue that we are still learning what it means.

    It is unclear to me, for example, that this kind of testing can determine which genes are silenced due to methylation.

    Yet information is information. People using it have to realize its only a guide, an indicator. This is about educating people about genetics.
    Valentijn likes this.
  5. barbc56

    barbc56 Senior Member

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    That could very well be. It's such an exciting science.

    I HATE PAYWALLS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    I am going to my sister and BIL's place sometime this next week (with the usual caveat if I am feeling well enough and have someone to help drive, etc.etc. Sound familiar?.) He is an oncologist/hematologist. I'm not sure which journals he has or has access to, however, I can find which journals his clinic subscribes and if possible (again the caveat) can take requests and will copy them if someone has a specific article I have a feeling it may be his clinic that pays for them to share the expense, but I think they have a library or access to one.

    I will ask my sister before I drive up and see if she can give me the names of the journals.
  6. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    :)Yes, who among us don't hate paywalls? :mad: They are anti-science in my view, as part of a complex system that has made nearly all science journals dubious for a variety of reasons.

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