The 12th Invest in ME Conference, Part 1
OverTheHills presents the first article in a series of three about the recent 12th Invest In ME international Conference (IIMEC12) in London.
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Searching for any insight for these 2 detox NAT2 SNP's

Discussion in 'Genetic Testing and SNPs' started by jason30, Mar 30, 2017.

  1. jason30

    jason30 Senior Member

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    The Netherlands
    Hi all,

    I have run the 23andme data through the Sterling's app of MTHFR support.
    A lot to study, but for now I want to focus on 2 SNP's:
    (a part of liver detox phase 2)

    Well, that's me. I can't detox properly and I have severe MCS since a few years.

    I wonder if there is something I can do about this slow acetylation?

    Thanks for any help/insight.
     
  2. alicec

    alicec Senior Member

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    Australia
    Slow or fast acetylation is not determined by any one SNP in NAT2 but by combinations of SNPs.

    Here is a list of various combinations and their resultant phenotype.

    Here is a program which predicts your status based on up to 6 positions in the gene. You list only two positions but it turns out those two together are good predictors of status. You are indeed a slow acetylator, assuming that the +/+ designation by MTHFRsupport correctly identifies the minor allele (I would check that if I were you).

    Please note the position referred to in the predictor program is the nucleotide position. Your reported results show the nucleotide position (282) for the second SNP but the first SNP shows the amino acid position in the protein coded for by the gene (position 197). You need to look at the SNPaedia entry to see that the nucleotide position for the change is 590.

    I just clicked on the minor allele (+/+) at each position to see that you are predicted to be a slow acetylator at a high rate of confidence.

    Being a slow acetylator is not unusual. In some ethnic groups, most people are slow acetylators. Generally, more than 50% of people of European and African origin are slow acetylators.

    There does seem to be a small increase in cancer risk associated with this phenotype, but it is very small.

    It is easy enough to check for medications which are metabolised by NAT2 and be aware that you may need reduced doses of such medications.

    I am not aware of any links between MCS and slow acetylation.
     
    jason30 and Valentijn like this.
  3. jason30

    jason30 Senior Member

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    The Netherlands
    Thank you so much for your reply, I will look into it further once my brain fog is less. :)
     

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