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rs956572AA - Inositol and Bipolar

Discussion in 'Genetic Testing and SNPs' started by Peyt, Jun 13, 2017.

  1. Peyt

    Peyt Senior Member

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    Hi,
    Does anyone know if this gene rs956572AA is responsible for bipolar disorder?
    I have the (A,G) version and as soon as when I take Inositol the first day I get a real nice Euphoric feeling and then starting the second day I get manic and then crash with sever headache.... wondering if it's from this gene and if yes is there any solutions for it? I know I can just not take Inositol, but I get this up and down feeling all the time anyways and Inositol just makes it worst so I would love to find a solution for it if possible. Any thoughts are appreciated.
     
  2. alicec

    alicec Senior Member

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    The short answer is no, neither that SNP nor the gene in which it occurs (BCL2), is responsible for the disorder.

    Twin studies do show that there is a strong heritability component to the disorder, though interestingly in practice this is not so clear. Most cases are isolated.

    Large scale genome wide association studies have shown a robust link to several genes (though not BCL2) but the contribution of any one gene is small. They are risk factors, not causes. Furthermore there is a clear environmental component to onset of the disorder.

    Here and here are a couple of recent reviews.
     
    Valentijn and Peyt like this.
  3. Peyt

    Peyt Senior Member

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  4. Valentijn

    Valentijn WE ARE KINA

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    It's a tiny study, in a pretty abnormal group. They also don't say anything about the effect size in the abstract, which is a bit of a warning sign, so it's probably a very small effect, if there actually is an effect.

    To answer your earlier question, this study says absolutely nothing about the SNP being associated with causing bipolar disorder. There's no suggestion that it's causative, though perhaps the paper cites to another paper which does suggest that.
     
  5. Peyt

    Peyt Senior Member

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  6. alicec

    alicec Senior Member

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    No, it suggests that the second messenger system initiated by inositol tri-phosphate MIGHT play some role in the action of mood stabilising drugs such as lithium.

    As the review you cite says
     

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