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Rooibus "tea"

Discussion in 'General Treatment' started by Dainty, Dec 13, 2009.

  1. Dainty

    Dainty Senior Member

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    I was wondering if anyone else has had success with Rooibus tea.

    I first got some because it was said to help with allergies, an dsince it's caffine-free and loaded with anti-oxidents it's supposed to be beneficial overall. I had been unimpressed with it until a few days ago when my body was on a sleepless marathon and I hadn't been able to sleep in two days, and wasn't the least bit tired. I had the notion to make a very strong cup of Rooibus tea to drink as I was using the computer for a distraction, and I was amazed at how quickly my body relaxed and soon the only thing I wanted to do was lay down and rest. And unlike the typical crash, resting actually felt good! I've since read that Rooibus is said to relieve nervous tension, so it looks liek that's what it did. It was not like a sedative--it did not put me to sleep right away or anything, it just made it possible for my body to relax enough for resting to be a pleasant experience. After about an hour I was asleep.

    I've tried a lot of herbs for muscle relaxants and sedative properties, but this is the one I'm most excited aobut. My experience with muscle relaxants is that they relaly help a lot at first, but then result in tenser muscles. And sedatives tend to make me sleepy even while resting is a painful or stressful experience. So far it doesn't appear to me that Rooibus causes either of these problems, which is exciting to me. Now I'm going to experiment with having some every night, to see if it will help me acheive a normal sleep schedule (along with the rest of the bag of tricks I utilize).

    Has anyone else tried Rooibus? What are your thoughts?
     
  2. Jody

    Jody Senior Member

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    Dainty,

    I've got some but I haven't tried it yet.

    You make it sound like it would be worth a try though.
     
  3. Sunday

    Sunday Senior Member

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    I hadn't known about this aspect of rooibos and am interested to hear what happens with your experiment.
     
  4. spit

    spit Senior Member

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    I had a bad anxiety and tension side effect from the medication I'm on for a while, before I got the dosage properly adjusted -- the only thing that helped me through it was drinking one or the other or a combo of rooibos and skullcap. The skullcap is working on some of the same receptors as benzodiazepines, but I'm not sure what chemicals are in the rooibos beyond the antioxidants and anti-inflammatories.

    Probably worth a shot regardless. Thanks for the reminder, I'd forgotten about it and maybe I'll play with the rooibos a bit myself for inflammation. I was fond of it before I was ever playing with anything medicinally, it's just a nice mellow non-caff tea with a low bitterness even when you steep it for quite a while.
     
  5. DavidJ.

    DavidJ.

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    yeah rooibus is great and tasty :)
     
  6. yuvi11

    yuvi11 Guest

    AYURVEDA is very helpful in eyes problems because Ayurveda Diet and nutrition are very helpful in good health
    AYURVEDA
     
  7. Mia

    Mia

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    I've got some but haven't tried it yet. I usually have peppermint and licorice root - amazing. I didn't know that roobios was meant to be relaxing and sedating... did you find it more relaxing and sedating than other teas? I have crazy sleep problems and am on diazepam - in combination with two other things, that's the only thing that works.
     
  8. Anika

    Anika Senior Member

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    I've enjoyed rooibos tea for years, and knew it was supposed to be "good", but hadn't heard about helping allergies or relaxation specifically - although usually having a cup of it means I am trying to relax, or warm up a bit. I'll have to try it specifically when I need help with those symptoms, which is often.

    I think it is also the tea that is referred to as "bush tea" in the series of books Ladies No. 1 Detective Agency, by Alexander McCall Smith, about a woman detective in Botswana. I always find those books relaxing, too - easy to read with the CFS brain. The DVDs of that series are excellent, also.

    Anika
     
  9. Diva55

    Diva55 Member

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    Rooibos Tea

    I like this tea especially the vanilla flavoured one & found it does relax. I found this article very interesting as it explains the tea's benefits. Although the future maybe to classify it as a drug!


    http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A12644020


    From BBC health website

    Tea is a much-loved drink, and different kinds are drunk every day around the world. One tea which has enjoyed a dramatic rise in popularity over the last decade is Rooibos1 or 'Redbush' tea.

    What is Rooibos Tea?
    Rooibos tea is a naturally uncaffeinated tea made from the Rooibos shrub Aspalathus linearis, which grows only on the North Western Cape of South Africa. The word 'Rooibos' means 'red bush' in Afrikaans, and is so-called because when the green, needle-like leaves of the plant are cut and left to dry in the sun, they turn a beautiful mahogany red colour.

    The Rooibos Plant
    The rooibos plant is actually a member of the legume family: flowering plants which also include beans and peas. This makes it quite different from conventional black or green teas, which are made from the leaves of the Camellia bush, part of the Theaceae family of trees and shrubs.

    Rooibos plants grow exclusively in the Cedarberg region of South Africa, where there is very little rainfall. The soil is sandy, very acidic, and contains virtually no nitrogen - an essential element for plants. Yet the rooibos plant thrives here, and has resisted attempts to grow it in other regions of the world. Part of the secret lies in the plant's very long taproot2, which can reach up to two metres into the ground in a mature plant. This means the plant can reach deep down into the soil for every last drop of water, and so can withstand very dry conditions. As a legume, the rooibos plant can also bind its own nitrogen through bacteria on its roots which take nitrogen from the air and 'fix' it in the plant. This means that the rooibos plants need no irrigation or fertilisation, and so grow and are harvested today much as they have always been.

    Rooibos plants produce seeds from their tiny yellow flowers, which bloom in early September. Rooibos farmers collect the seeds to propagate more plants. Some of the seeds are gathered from the plants, while others are obtained from the nests of ants, which gather them for food.

    History of Rooibos Tea
    For centuries, rooibos tea was drunk by the Khoisan tribe of South Africa, who used it as a herbal medicine. In the 18th Century, a botanist named Carl Humberg reported its use and it began to be enjoyed by South Africans. In 1904, a Russian immigrant called Benjamin Ginsberg began to offer Rooibos to a worldwide market, calling it 'Mountain Tea'. Farmers began to cultivate the crop, and it increased in popularity, especially in the West during World War II, when traditional black tea from Asia was very hard to get hold of.

    In 1968, a South African mother named Annique Theron accidentally used some leftover rooibos tea in her baby daughter's bottle and discovered that it had a calming and soothing effect, relieving the baby's chronic restlessness, vomiting and stomach cramps. She advertised in her local newspaper and found other mothers whose infants had similar problems, and these provided a testing ground for her theories about the healing properties of rooibos tea. Wanting to share her discovery with the rest of the world, she wrote a book on the anti-allergic qualities of the Rooibos plant called Allergies: an Amazing Discovery. She later created a range of skincare products containing rooibos extract, which are used to treat dry, irritated and allergic skin.

    In 1997, the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO) awarded rooibos a gold medal for its anti-allergic properties, and in 1998 it awarded Annique Theron 'Woman Discoverer of the Year'.

    So What's so Special about Rooibos Tea?
    Rooibos is naturally caffeine-free, and has less than half the tannin of ordinary tea. Tannin is what gives ordinary tea its bitter taste. It stains teeth and can prevent the absorption of iron in the body.
    Rooibos is rich in antioxidants, the substances that combat free radicals in the body3. They are anti-spasmodic, anti-inflammatory and anti-allergenic. Health problems that can be helped by drinking rooibos tea include headaches, colic, asthma, hay fever and insomnia. Rooibos is also said to be beneficial to pancreatitis sufferers, as it soothes the pain of digestive reflux.

    Rooibos is also excellent for skin conditions such as eczema, psoriasis or dermatitis. It soothes nappy rash and improves skin condition in acne sufferers. The tea can either be applied to the skin, used as a wash or a drench for the hair to relive dry, itchy scalp, or used in skincare products such as soaps and cleansers. Hospitals in South Africa routinely use rooibos in baths for children with allergic skin conditions, as well as giving it as a drink.

    Rooibos is also used to relieve nervous tension and stomach and bowel irritation. It eases the painful symptoms of urinary system diseases such as prostatitis and cystitis, due to its high content of the anti-inflammatory antioxidant quercetin, which has been shown in clinical trials to relieve the symptoms of prostatitis.

    How to Enjoy Rooibos Tea
    Many people drink rooibos tea as they would black tea, sometimes adding a splash of milk, a slice of lemon or a little honey. It can be reheated by warming on the hob as many times as you like, without the flavour being impaired. Less bitter than black tea, the sweet flavour of rooibos means it's also easier to cut out those teaspoons of sugar! Alternatively, rooibos can be served as an iced tea, or mixed with fruit juice or wine.

    Rooibos is also used in cooking, where it can replace any liquid usually used in a recipe, giving the dish its own colour and flavour. It is also said to be a natural meat tenderiser. There are many recipes which include rooibos tea, including soups, salads, meat and fish dishes, and even puddings.

    The Future of Rooibos Tea
    Around 8,000 tonnes of rooibos tea are produced each year, of which just under half is consumed in South Africa and the rest is exported around the world, primarily to Germany, Japan and the Netherlands.

    Rooibos tea has gained even more popularity over the last couple of years, with the publication of the bestselling No.1 Ladies Detective Agency series by Alexander McCall Smith. In the books, the main character, Precious Ramotswe, serves her visitors 'redbush' tea. Previously found only in health food shops, most supermarkets in the UK now stock rooibos tea produced by various different suppliers, and its popularity is also growing in the US.

    Researchers are studying the health effects of rooibos tea, and some believe rooibos may eventually be classified as a drug, due to its protective and health-giving properties. It is being studied as a preventative against environmentally and dietary-induced cancer. In laboratory trials using rats, rooibos has been shown to slow down or even stop the cell mutations that can lead to cancer. Scientists are planning to begin clinical trials on humans in the near future. It is at this stage that the properties of rooibos will be fully discovered, as many drugs that are tested on rats do not have the same effects when used by humans.

    Many years of clinical trials lie ahead for rooibos, but until the results are published and we know just how important this plant and its extracts are, why not get ahead of the game and start enjoying this refreshing, healthy beverage now?

    1 Pronounced 'roy-boss'.
    2 The primary root, which grows directly downwards.
    3 Free radicals are highly chemically reactive molecules that can damage parts of the body's cells, including DNA. They are implicated in health issues such as cancer and heart disease.
     
  10. Sushi

    Sushi Moderator and Senior Member Albuquerque

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    This is funny to me. I lived in South Africa for 15 years and drank Rooibos tea every day. I actually knew the Ginsberg family mentioned above!

    Sushi
     
  11. Anika

    Anika Senior Member

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    That's an interesting article - rooibos is even better than I thought! I hope it doesn't end up getting drug classification.

    Diva, sometimes we've found the kind with vanilla, which I agree is very nice.

    I never thought of using the tea for skin. I think I'd heard about using green tea bags on the eyelids, for example. I'll have to save the teabags and any leftovers for skin.
     
  12. Diva55

    Diva55 Member

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    Hi Sushi
    Now that is a strange co-incidence!

    Sometimes an old life catches up with us in unexpected ways.
     
  13. Diva55

    Diva55 Member

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    Hi Anika
    I don't know if you're in the UK.
    If you are Lidls sell a nice brand of Rooibus with different flavours including Vanilla. They do a caramel one which I hated but the plain one is nice.

    I leave the teabags in the cup till I finish the drink, then I re-use the teabag as it's very stong.

    I'll have to experiment on the skin as well as I get patches of dermatitis.

    Best wishes
     
  14. Anika

    Anika Senior Member

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    Brands of Rooibos in US


    Diva, I'm in the US and haven't seen the brand or store you mention. We used to find it only at the health food store, but now rooibos is in the supermarket, which is convenient, though the brands always seem to change. Eventually, even Twinings brand appeared, and recently there was Numi with vanilla, which I think used to be at the health food store.

    I haven't reused the teabags but will have to try it. I do like the stronger flavors, so if it weakens I might have to boost with another bag.

    I read somewhere a long time ago that dunking teabags - this was for brown or green tea, so might be different- does help to boost or release the good compounds from those teas. Also, I figure it has to help get the most flavor from the bag. So my ritual now is to actively dunk for a 60 count to start, and maybe later. I like with rooibos that you can keep the bag in while you drink, and it doesn't get bitter.

    Cheers!
    Anika
     
  15. jace

    jace Off the fence

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    I've been drinking Redbush tea for a year or so. For the last few weeks, every afternoon I make myself a pot of redbush with an inch or so of squashed licorice root. The pot holds about 4 mugs full, and it lasts me through the evening. On the rare day when I forget to do this, I notice the difference.

    It has helped with the wired feeling, nightmares and sleeplessness, and cognition too, so you can guess I'll be keeping this habit! Anika is right, it doesn't matter how long it's brewed, it still tastes good. It's nice chilled too.

    I read somewhere that licorice can cause hypertension, but I'm keeping an eye on BP, and if anything its reducing overall toward normal. When I was first Dx'd, my BP was way up, 165/105, plus or minus. Now I'm 130/85, but maybe that's more to do with the raw garlic I have two or three times a day.

    I'd much rather use things that taste good, than eat a load of pills.
     
  16. Sunday

    Sunday Senior Member

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    I learned a lot about rooibos on this thread! Since pancreas problems and other digestive stuff are common with us, and since I personally (as well as others) am plagued with skin problems as well, this sounds worthwhile on that basis alone - plus it might have even deeper-reaching effects than that. Also, while I enjoy herb teas, I miss the acerbic zing of black tea and coffee (caffeine is like buying on credit, though fortunately I can still do chocolate). I've used rooibos occasionally in the past, but I might try making it a more regular routine now, and see what happens.

    By the way, for those on a budget: buying the tea in bulk is a lot cheaper. If you need the extra flavors with it, you can play with flavor extracts (put them in last, because they evaporate in the steam).
     
  17. IntuneJune

    IntuneJune Senior Member

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    Isn't this forum wonderful!!!! Small world.

    June
     
  18. I love rooibos tea, you can also make a really nice iced tea with some flavoured rooibos teas or with plain I would imagine. My current favourite is a blend of rooibos and honeybush teas with peach and plum, which is intended to be an iced tea. It is absolutely delicious, it has some natural sweetness and is so refreshing. I buy loose leaf teas, so it is not from a brand that I could recommend to anyone, but if you have a local tea shop, you could see if they have any or encourage them to find a supplier..
     
  19. Anika

    Anika Senior Member

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    chrissteven,

    That blend sounds delicious. Do you drink it hot also?

    We don't have a nearby tea shop for loose teas, but I may look for some online.

    Anika
     
  20. Diva55

    Diva55 Member

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    I tried something with Rooibus tea - and no I'm not cracking up but maybe I am.

    My face was feeling very hot and I wanted to cool it. I had an empty cup of Rooibus tea with just the cold teabag in it and so thought why not.

    I rubbed the cold squeezed tea bag on my face. It helped cool it but after doing it for sometime I noticed my skin was baby soft! It felt like I'd put some moisturiser on it but even better.

    I looked up Rooibus skin products but they are expensive and don't give all the ingredients so you don't know what chemicals they are adding.
    I wish I had the energy to make things like soap etc but I'm going to continue using the old teabags this way.

    Rooibus drinkers - try this out and let me know if this is the same result for you - then I know I'm not cracking up!
     

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