Looking Ahead to Change: Little by Little
I don't make New Year's Resolutions. I don't think I ever really did, but the last decade or two would have been enough to stifle that impulse. I've just been too aware that I don't have that much control over what happens in my life.
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Role of dietary modification in alleviating CFS symptoms: a systematic review

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by Kati, Jun 17, 2017.

  1. Kati

    Kati Patient in training

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    Role of dietary modification in alleviating chronic fatigue syndrome symptoms: a systematic review

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1753-6405.12670/abstract

    Abstract

    Objective: To review the evidence for the role of dietary modifications in alleviating chronic fatigue syndrome symptoms.

    Methods: A systematic literature review was guided by PRISMA and conducted using Scopus, CINAHL Plus, Web of Science and PsycINFO scientific databases (1994–2016) to identify relevant studies. Twenty-two studies met the inclusion criteria, the quality of each paper was assessed and data extracted into a standardised tabular format.

    Results: Positive outcomes were highlighted in some included studies for polyphenol intakes in animal studies, D-ribose supplementation in humans and aspects of symptom alleviation for one of three polynutrient supplement studies. Omega three fatty acid blood levels and supplementation with an omega three fatty acid supplement also displayed positive outcomes in relation to chronic fatigue syndrome symptom alleviation.

    Conclusions: Limited dietary modifications were found useful in alleviating chronic fatigue syndrome symptoms, with overall evidence narrow and inconsistent across studies.

    Implications for public health: Due to the individual and community impairment chronic fatigue syndrome causes the population, it is vital that awareness and further focused research on this topic is undertaken to clarify and consolidate recommendations and ensure accurate, useful distribution of information at a population level.
     
  2. msf

    msf Senior Member

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    Pity it is only a review. A study of the FODMAP or Paleo diet in ME would have been much more interesting.
     
  3. knackers323

    knackers323 Senior Member

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    I feel much better when I dont eat. If you can call that a diet modification. I obviously havent been able to work out just how far the improvements will go
     
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  4. msf

    msf Senior Member

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    My diet, which has been very successful in reducing my symptoms is FODMAP-based, low in insoluble fibre, low in resistant starch, low in sugar, caffeine-free, and I also try to limit my intake of things that have been associated (according to the Paleo stuff, but it seems to bear out for me) with a leaky gut, such as peppers and tomatoes (although I eat a lot of potatoes since the solanine, which apparently causes leaky gut, is mostly in the skin).

    This probably sounds very restrictive, and it is, but it has enabled me to go from moderately severe to just moderate, and the gut treatment (antibiotics) I have had have then put me in the position to start thinking about working again.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2017
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  5. msf

    msf Senior Member

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    I should just note that my ME was triggered by Yersinia, so gut interventions may be more effective for people like me than for those with other kinds of infections/triggers. That´s no reason not to try dietary ones though.
     
  6. Londinium

    Londinium Senior Member

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    Looking at some of the studies that are referred to in this review, it's safe to say this is a bit of an understatement! :)
     
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  7. Gondwanaland

    Gondwanaland Senior Member

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    Whatever diet we follow we must be careful to NOT follow a thiamine depleting diet:
     

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  8. Kati

    Kati Patient in training

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    Everybody seems to have an opinion about whether diets and dietary supplements make a difference in ME or not. According to thIs abstract, there is not much scientific evidence out there. It means that people's experiences are N=1 experiments and improvement may be attributable to personal beliefs that the diet will change anything (placebo effect), to the fluctuatons of the disease, or to the diet itself.

    The people who swear they got better from dietary changes are still here and still sick.

    The problem with people litterally advertising they got better with xyz supplement or diet is that it provides one more reason for governments and socialized health care systems to fund less research, less costly clinical trials, and more education about diets as treatment.

    The current evidence for special diets, supplements is simply not there at the moment.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2017
  9. Gondwanaland

    Gondwanaland Senior Member

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    There will not be one diet for CFS sufferers as much as there isn't one diet for other people. However, having CFS doesn't make one immune to developing issues that also affect otherwise healthy people.
     
  10. msf

    msf Senior Member

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    I don´t agree in the case of the FODMAP diet, since this has been shown to help those with IBS, and as we know, IBS is a co-morbid condition in ME patients.
     
  11. Solstice

    Solstice Senior Member

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    The physician treating me does lactose and fructose tests and a test for food sensitivities. After that I got a detailed dietplan from his inhouse dietician(Tobback). These in no way cured me, but it has made things more bearable for me. If I eat certain food from outside the diet my stomach tends to swell up, my sleep get's worse, pain get's worse also and I start to itch(especially with herbs and spices). This is the same regardless if I'm knowingly taking it in or unknowingly.

    For me it's very very far from a cure. But it definitely does make things better to restrict my eating to what's on the list.
     
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  12. msf

    msf Senior Member

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    I have the same physcian, although I didn´t get a diet plan (probably because I didn´t have any food sensitivities) and had to work things out for myself. I think every ME physician should recommend trying the FODMAP diet, I mean if it only helps 10% (likely to be higher given the number of ME patients with IBS) as much as it helped me, why wouldn´t you? This isn´t a criticism of ME physicians, I think doctors in general pay little heed to dietary considerations.
     
  13. Learner1

    Learner1 Professional Patient

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    Well, not in that paper...

    We are all genetically different, with different gut microbiomes, levels of toxicity, immune and endocrine system status, and nutrient status.

    It is ludicrous to think we all need the same supplement, no matter how sick we are.

    What we need are studies on personalised medicine - testing people for nutrient status and microbiome status and providing them with customized supplementation and microbiome support.

    I know I need massive doses of B12. Lab tests and the fact it gets me out of a stupor have proven this to be so. If you give me some standardized RDA/DV dose of cyanocobalamin, it wouldn't faze me... and I don't happen to need DHA or EPA, so giving me 2g of fish oil a day wouldn't help either. And I'm celiac and allergic to casein, so that gluten free/dairy free diet helps me greatly while you may have no need for it.

    The human body is complex and our dietary needs are complex. Random double blind placebo studies are not an effective way to tell if a single dietary invention works across a population of unique individuals.

    Garbage in, garbage out... Let's advocate for thoughtful dietary studies that show benefits of personalized interventions.
     
  14. pamojja

    pamojja Senior Member

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    Though not against ME/CFS but individualized, for example this:

    With standard protocols (low fat/low cholesterol diet, exercise, and lipid lowering agents) 1 in 3 patients experience a new adverse event within 5 years.

    With Nutrigenomic-based dietary interventions (reduction of grains, real food, individualized supplementation) about 1 in 60 patients only experience a new adverse event within 9 years.
     
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  15. Learner1

    Learner1 Professional Patient

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  16. Gondwanaland

    Gondwanaland Senior Member

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    For those looking to reducing auto-antibodies... It will not cure CFS but can relieve a lot of symptoms.
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2017
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  17. abc123

    abc123

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    http://gundrymd.com/food-pyramid/

    I'm interested in hearing from anyone else trying the diet Dr. Gundry outlines in his latest book "The Plant Paradox."

    The diet overlaps with Dr. Terry Wahls' "Wahl's Warrior Diet," and Dr. Sara Myhill who pushes a ketogenic diet as of late. And probably Dr. Mercola's Fat for Fuel diet. Sort of Ketogenic and Paleo, but with the emphasis not on adding anything to the diet, but removing lectins.

    The book has clear Yes and No food lists, and some simple recommended products that are not Gundry's own.

    It's available in public libraries, so you don't need to buy it. Many reviews on Amazon, some of which are critical of poor citation and references to support the doctor's claims, yet many anecdotal raves.

    Gundry has a powerful marketing machine for his supplements, but one can try the diet without buying any of his supplements.

    Not pushing anything here, just looking for feedback about this diet...

    Edit: Sorry, I see this subforum is for Studies only; so I started a new thread in the "Gut" forum:
    http://forums.phoenixrising.me/index.php?threads/dr-gundry-plant-paradox-diet.55872/
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2017
  18. wendys feats

    wendys feats

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