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Researcher allegiance in psychotherapy outcome research: An overview of reviews (Munder et al. 2013)

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Dolphin, Mar 22, 2013.

  1. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    Research psychologist, James C. Coyne on Twitter highlighted this as:



    *I gave each sentence its own paragraph
    biophile, WillowJ, taniaaust1 and 3 others like this.
  2. Simon

    Simon

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    Monmouth, UK
    Which is particularly interesting as the typical effect size in such therapies is also 'moderate'.

    I'm not sure if this means the RA bias is big enough to account for most of the observed outcome effect size in trials, or just that, on average, RA bias has a moderate effect on the reported moderate outcome :)
  3. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    I'm afraid you're just going to have to do a PhD in statistics ;) (alternatively they didn't give enough info).
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  4. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

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    Thanks. I've seen a few things about this recently, and they always remind me of the poor and spun results we see from BPS CFS studies run by those with a clear 'allegiance'.
    biophile and Dolphin like this.
  5. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    Yesterday, James C. Coyne tweeted (relating to a blog on this paper):

  6. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    Blog on this paper which tries to explain the area a bit*
    *although then talking about the possible bias for the allegiance bias hypothesis in some allegiance bias researchers (but not others) as well as a discussion of a "meta-meta-analysis" may undo the explanation and leave some confused by the end!?
  7. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

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    I wonder what the allegiance of those doing the meta-meta-analysis was?

    My take home: unless the research shows a consistent and large affect for an intervention, don't bother with it in the real world as it's probably not worth the as yet undetected side-effects. People need less medical advice, and there should be more accountability for making money from giving poor and misleading medical advice.
    Sean likes this.
  8. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    Fair point.

    I'm not sure one can read all that from the study(s), although it may well be true.

    Aside: this is one of the main reasons I have a soft spot for infectious theories. If you treat infections in such situations, it seems like it might increase the chance it is a useful therapy (over knocking out abnormalities in other models for the illness).
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  9. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

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    I feel like I'm looking at one of those M C Esher infinite perspective things!

    No, not from just this one study - but I've come to realise that I used to have a quite foolish faith in expertise and science (even while thinking I was a cynical sceptic), and that quite a lot of research in different areas is badly done and misleading. Ah well.
    Dolphin and Sean like this.
  10. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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