A New Decade of ME Research: The 11th Invest in ME International ME Conference 2016
Mark Berry presents the first in a series of articles on the 11th Invest in ME International ME Conference in London ...
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Regulatory T, natural killer T and γδ T cells in multiple sclerosis and ME/CFS

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by Kati, Mar 28, 2016.

  1. Kati

    Kati Patient in training

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    From Facebook:

    Dear Supporters,
    The team at NCNED would again like announce their latest scientific paper that has been accepted for publication. We would like to thank all the supporters and participants who assist us in our research.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27001659

    Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol. 2016 Mar 20. doi: 10.12932/AP0733. [Epub ahead of print]
    Regulatory T, natural killer T and γδ T cells in multiple sclerosis and chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis: a comparison.
    Ramos S1, Brenu E, Broadley S, Kwiatek R, Ng J, Nguyen T, Freeman S, Staines D, Marshall-Gradisnik S.
    Author information

    Abstract
    BACKGROUND:
    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME), and Multiple Sclerosis (MS) may share some similarities in relation to reduced NK cell activity. It is likely that other cells such as regulatory T (Tregs), invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) and gamma delta T (γδ T) cells may also be dysregulated in CFS/ME and MS.

    OBJECTIVES:
    To evaluate and compare specific immune regulatory cells of patients with CFS/ME, patients with MS and healthy controls.

    METHODS:
    Sixty three volunteers were included in this study, 24 were CFS/ME patients, 11 MS patients and 27 healthy controls. Blood samples were obtained from all the participants for flow cytometer analysis of iNKT cell, Tregs and γδ T cell phenotypes.

    RESULTS:
    We observed significant increase in Tregs in the CFS/ME group (p≤0.005) compared with the healthy controls group. Total γδ and γδ 2 T cells were significantly reduced in the MS patients in comparison with the healthy controls group. Conversely, CD4+iNKT percentage of iNKT, was significantly increased in the CFS/ME group compared with healthy controls and double negative iNKT percentage of iNKT significantly decreased compared with the healthy controls group.

    CONCLUSION:
    This study has not identified immunological disturbances that are common in both MS and CFS/ME patients. However differential expression of cell types between the conditions investigated suggests different pathways of disease. These differences need to be explored in further studies.
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2016
  2. Sea

    Sea Senior Member

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  3. *GG*

    *GG* Senior Member

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    What is NCNED?
    @Kati

    GG
     
  4. Kati

    Kati Patient in training

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    Griffith University's National Centre for Neuroimmunology and Emerging Diseases (Australia)
     
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  5. Kati

    Kati Patient in training

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    That's weird, it didn't show up to me as a facebook link. i have edited it, can you tell me if it's all good now?
     
  6. shannah

    shannah Senior Member

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    Clicking on your link just now @Kati took me to the proper PubMed page.
     
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  7. sdmcvicar

    sdmcvicar

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  8. halcyon

    halcyon Senior Member

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    The majority of the news coverage on their announcement said they will be using their SNP findings as the basis of the screening test but there has been no official confirmation of this as far as I know.
     
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  9. tango

    tango Senior Member

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  10. daisybell

    daisybell Senior Member

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    @tango
    I'm no expert, but that reads like rubbish to me.....
     
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  11. tango

    tango Senior Member

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    Which part? The Griffiths University study that says there are 13 genes indicated in chronic fatigue syndrome or the T cells bit?

    I've done a lot of biohacking and learned a lot about health but the whole T-cell thing is a mystery to me. I don't really understand it. I just know that:
    • Of the genes I've had typed 8/9 have mutations so I can relate to the study
    • SAM-e/methionine lower histamine (among other things) and they help with my pain. I do take it with tyrosine and I have been playing with separating them to try and work out which does what. It seems to me that the combination is synergistic and better than either on their own
    Maybe it's all a red herring. I wish the study said more about the proposed solution and not just the genes,

    http://www.la-press.com/examination...rphisms-snps-in-transient-recep-article-a4824
     
  12. daisybell

    daisybell Senior Member

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  13. tango

    tango Senior Member

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    Cool bananas. Thanks @daisybell

    I'll go read it and see if I can get my head around it
     
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  14. knackers323

    knackers323 Senior Member

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    Anyone seen prof smith or know what is happening with the test Griffith were planning to commercialize?
     

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