MEAdvocacy.org Update and a Call for Continued Support
“I have tried raising money by asking for it, and by not asking for it. I always got more by asking for it.”
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Pyroluria results are back; I'm positive, but what does that mean?

Discussion in 'General Symptoms' started by drob31, Aug 1, 2014.

  1. drob31

    drob31 Senior Member

    Messages:
    503
    Likes:
    210
    PROCEDURE KRYPTOPYRROLE (URINE) CORRECTED (calculated) **
    RESULT: 13.04 HIGH
    PROCEDURE KRYPTOPYRROLE (URINE) UNCORRECTED (actual)
    RESULT: 7.67
    SPECIFIC GRAVITY: 1.010
    KRYPTOPYRROLE REFERENCE RANGES:
    Optimal Range 0-9 mcg/dl
    Your kryptopyrrole result is not in the optimal range of 0-9.


    So this basically says that the "uncorrected" result was within range, but when they "correct" it, it's above range. This seems a little suspect to me since there are two results.

    In any case, I will say that higher dose zinc has noticeably improved my fatigue and even increased my body temp in the last few days.

    Does anyone know if 13 is a high number or is it slightly above reference?
     
  2. liverock

    liverock Senior Member

    Messages:
    573
    Likes:
    544
    UK
    Pyroluria is usually treated by vitamin P-5-P, zinc and vitamin B6

    http://pyroluriatesting.com/faq/
    How is pyrrole disorder diagnosed?


    Pyroluria is diagnosed by performing a quantitative test, which measures pyrroles in the urine. When the testing is complete the results are reported with the following reference ranges. Optimal Range is 0-10 mcg/dl, Borderline Pyroluria is 10-20, Pyroluria is 20 and above. Also the concentration of urine should be taken into consideration when interpreting the KP results. The calculated kryptopyrrole compensates/corrects for how dilute or concentrated the urine specimen is. The actual kryptopyrrole is uncorrected/not calculated. The value for kryptopyrrole (KP) can vary quite a bit depending on concentration of the urine. We would recommend using the corrected value since it will be easier to follow changes in levels and to adjust your treatment. By using the corrected value for concentration of urine, you will be able to better assess the impact of your treatment. By following the changes, you will be able to correlate changes in your patient’s symptoms with changes in KP levels/dosages.
     
  3. drob31

    drob31 Senior Member

    Messages:
    503
    Likes:
    210
    Thanks. They didn't provide the reference range in my lab results copy.

    So 13 means something could be going on. They did say to take a sample when my symptoms were the worst, but they were not at the time. So I'm wondering if that number could be higher based on certain variables.
     
  4. ahmo

    ahmo Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,714
    Likes:
    1,371
    Northcoast NSW, Australia
  5. Martial

    Martial Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,112
    Likes:
    813
    Ventura, CA
  6. drob31

    drob31 Senior Member

    Messages:
    503
    Likes:
    210
    So do you think pyroluria is primary or could just be one of many problems?
     
  7. drob31

    drob31 Senior Member

    Messages:
    503
    Likes:
    210
    I'm bumping this because I forgot about pyroluria and started chasing phantoms.

    The question is, is pyroluria the cause or simply a comorbid symptom?
     
  8. Martial

    Martial Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,112
    Likes:
    813
    Ventura, CA
    It can be both, there is a genetic factor that is linked but also physiological changes occurring due to illness. Sometimes in the case of illness the start up and re balancing of the vitamins and minerals will be enough, other times you may need to keep treatment ongoing but not necessarily life long. If in the case of genetic causes then it would need to be done indefinitely.
     

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page