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Hunting down the cause of ME/CFS & other challenging disorders - Lipkin in London
In a talk to patients in London on 3rd September, Dr. W. Ian Lipkin described the extraordinary lengths he and his team are prepared to go to in order to track down the source of an illness, with examples ranging from autism to the strange case of Kawasaki disease.
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Psychobiotics: A Novel Class of Psychotropic: That's probiotic yoghurt to me!

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Firestormm, Jun 18, 2013.

  1. Firestormm

    Firestormm Guest

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    Cornwall England
    Here we go then:

    :zippit:
     
  2. Valentijn

    Valentijn Activity Level: 3

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    Sounds more like "we're discovering that the causes of a lot of presumed-psychological disorders are completely physiological. But that doesn't sound so good for our job prospects, so instead we're re-labeling physiological treatments to make them sound more psychological."
     
    natasa778, biophile, A.B. and 3 others like this.
  3. NilaJones

    NilaJones Senior Member

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    Yep.

    Like toxoplasmosis, was it, and schizophrenia.
     
  4. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6

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    I prefer to address the causes, which appear to be mainly the wrong diet, over-exertion and stress, through correcting the diet and taking supplements. It's working for me re anxiety, sleep, sinus congestion, gut, muscle strength, skin, etc. Not as dramatic and 'sexy' as a magic bullet, fancy new probiotic or new name.

    Last time I looked I wasn't a rat, but evidence from humans is more interesting, albeit just suggesting that they have found a new way to treat something that existing things can already do.

    A clear illustration of the fall from favour of long-established, cheap, natural substances in favour of overpriced branded ones was when I tried to buy sodium bicarbonate in 2 pharmacies. Neither pharmacy had it on the shelves, which were heaving with branded products, some of which contained bicarb plus other things. I had to ask. One pharmacy had it in the rear of the shop, only accessible to staff (they now have it on the shelves - hooray!), and the other had it in a drawer. This is a safe, effective substance with multiple uses. Is some pressure being exerted to remove such substances from shelves to make room for more profitable stuff?
     
  5. A.B.

    A.B. Senior Member

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    It's hard to let go of prematurely formed conclusions. It's good to see this topic getting more attention.

    I've always wondered how the widespread use of chemical additives in foods is affecting the gut flora. I would not be surprised if some preservatives turned out to have a significant negative effect on the gut flora. The purpose of many preservatives is to stop proliferation of microorganisms after all. If such an effect exists, then it cannot easily be detected with standard toxicity testing.
     
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  6. Firestormm

    Firestormm Guest

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    Fair point A.B. And why shouldn't all this not have an effect on one's mental health as well as in other respects.

    I don't understand this paper is all. My reference to yoghurt is a sign of my ignorance and poor attempt at humour :)
     

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