Professor & patients' paper on the solvable biological challenge of ME/CFS: reader-friendly version
Simon McGrath provides a patient-friendly version of a peer-reviewed paper which highlights some of the most promising biomedical research on ME/CFS ...
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Prostaglandins, rather than cytokines, central in communicating inflammation to brain

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by natasa778, Mar 26, 2012.

  1. natasa778

    natasa778 Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,773
    Likes:
    2,447
    Sub-pyrogenic systemic inflammation impacts on brain and behavior, independent of cytokines

    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0889159107000359

     
    oceanblue and Waverunner like this.
  2. natasa778

    natasa778 Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,773
    Likes:
    2,447
  3. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,115
    Likes:
    32,636
    Logan, Queensland, Australia
    I have been interested in this topic since 1993. Eicosanoids (not just prostaglandins) are highly disturbed in ME. Treatment based on this goes back to 1988 but there was never any real interest or funding. Look up Gray and Martinovic on PubMed. Several of the popular theories on ME including the tenth paradigm and methylation theories link to problems with cyclooxygenase and inflammatory eicosanoids.

    I became interested in indomethacin very long ago when I realized that alcohol poisoning is nonlethal under indomethacin. Alcohol kills via release of arachidonic acid, which triggers cyclooxygenase activity and hence eicosanoid synthesis. It also triggers massive oxidative stress and localized vasodilation. Many of these eicosanoids are pro-inflammatory. My dietary strategies since 1993 have been aimed at reducing this kind of eicosanoid impact. I keep meaning to write a blog on this, but its still only half finished, and has been half finished for months.

    Bye, Alex
     
  4. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Hibernating

    Messages:
    4,522
    Likes:
    11,677
    South Australia
  5. anciendaze

    anciendaze Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,761
    Likes:
    4,426
    Notice that prostaglandins got their name from a gland which has figured prominently in recent debate, though the biochemicals found in the original discovery probably originated in seminal vesicles. We are still talking about chronic sub-acute inflammation of ducted glands which undergo dramatic changes at sexual maturity. The corresponding female structures are Skene's glands and the endometrium.

    Someone should ask Denise O'Keefe about prostaglandins and her research on benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH), to say nothing of reported findings of retroviruses with replication promoted by androgens and glucocorticoids.
     
  6. oceanblue

    oceanblue Guest

    Messages:
    1,174
    Likes:
    362
    UK
    Very interesting, thanks.
     
  7. heapsreal

    heapsreal iherb 10% discount code OPA989,

    Messages:
    8,769
    Likes:
    7,842
    australia (brisbane)
    IL6 is interesting as seems to play a big role in causing sleep issues in cfs, dhea is known to help reduce IL6. SInce using dhea at the start of the year my sleep has seemed to stabilize and although far from perfect, it has improved and i have reduced my sleep meds some. I dont take dhea as a sleeping pill before bed but in the morning as it helps with energy but helps lower IL6 which indirectly may help with sleep???

    cheers!!!!
     
  8. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,115
    Likes:
    32,636
    Logan, Queensland, Australia
    Hi anciendaze, I just wish to correct a potential error. Prostaglandins were historically isolated from the prostate (of bulls I think) but every single cell in the body that is metabolically active makes them. These are autocrine and paracrine hormones, not endocrine hormones. Even simple multicellular organisms make them. Prostaglandins are a subtype of eicosanoids, which refers to twenty (eicosa-) carbons. They are fat derivatives, that is fat-based hormones.

    The role of autocrine hormones is to signal the originating cell - they are a way of transmitting information across a cell. Paracrine hormones are similar, but they transmit from cell to cell - they spread hormonal signals through tissues. Endocrine hormones on the other hand transmit signals via the blood. So inflammatory eicosanoid hormones have a range of only a few millimeters. However, it is possible for chain reactions to occur - one cell triggers the next, and so on. It is also probable, though I do not know to what extent it has been researched, that eicosanoids can trigger additional responses via other hormones and nerve impulses, and these can travel farther.

    If you heavily rub the inside of your arm the skin goes red. This is the action of eicosanoids (and other mechanisms including histamine I think) - a rapid inflammatory response. Eicosanoids have a very short half-life typically, on the order of seconds. They are hard to isolate and study.

    I hope this information is accurate, I have not researched this topic in many years.

    Bye, Alex
     
  9. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Hibernating

    Messages:
    4,522
    Likes:
    11,677
    South Australia
    The gland doesn't have to be directly involved if we are talking about isoprostanes which are analogues of prostaglandins, but are products of "free radical-catalyzed peroxidation of essential fatty acids".

    The functions of the various prostaglandins are interesting though:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prostaglandin#Types
    And for isoprostanes,
    http://ajplung.physiology.org/content/280/6/L1067.full.pdf html
     
  10. anciendaze

    anciendaze Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,761
    Likes:
    4,426
    Note that I never said prostaglandins were only produced by the prostate. I even said that the original isolation probably found chemicals produced by seminal vesicles. My point was that reproductive organs produce copious amounts which made detection easier. This is consistent with hypotheses including viruses causing inflammation having androgen and glucocorticoid receptor elements, also with a preference for mucous membranes.

    At this point I won't say more.
     
  11. mellster

    mellster Marco

    Messages:
    804
    Likes:
    189
    San Francisco
    I would say that I have had an addiction to foods/dishes containing curcumin for quite a while now :)
     
  12. natasa778

    natasa778 Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,773
    Likes:
    2,447
    looks like hypobaric hypoxia-induced immune changes are also mediated by PGs. I don't have access to full paper but the claim is:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22270486

     
  13. natasa778

    natasa778 Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,773
    Likes:
    2,447
    also this very recent one, confirms previous:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22219191

     

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page