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Probiotics Overview

Discussion in 'The Gut: De Meirleir & Maes; H2S; Leaky Gut' started by Waverunner, Oct 1, 2011.

  1. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

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    Here is a small overview about different probiotic strains:

    http://www.innvista.com/health/nutrition/biotics/proborg.htm

    Example for L. acidophilus:

    L. acidophilus is the most commonly known probiotic bacterium. It is found primarily in the small intestine where it produces natural antibiotics called lactocidin and acidophilin. These increase immune resistance against such harmful bacteria and fungi as Candida albicans, Salmonella, E. coli, and Staphylococcus aureus.
    L. acidophilus implants itself on the intestinal walls, as well as on the lining of the vagina, cervix, and urethra, thereby preventing other organisms from multiplying to the extent that they can cause infections. For years, it was assumed that it was the most beneficial form of the good bacteria; but recent research has revealed that L. rhamnosus may be just as important.
    L. acidophilus helps control intestinal infections, thus reducing the potential of diarrhea and other infections or diseases. It also inhibits some types of cancer and helps control serum cholesterol levels. However, reaching the intestines is the problem because the L. acidophilus found in most commercial yogurts cannot live with stomach acids and bile.

    The Handbook of probiotics:

    http://books.google.de/books?id=k_7...m=3&sqi=2&ved=0CFoQ6AEwAg#v=onepage&q&f=false

    Another e-book about probiotics (some pages are missing in the free version):

    http://books.google.de/books?id=Nv8...&resnum=1&ved=0CC0Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false

    Some excellent information and studies about L. rhamnosus GG:

    http://www.chr-hansen.com/uploads/tx_tcdownloadables/Selected_summaries_LGG.pdf

    http://ammattilaiset.valio.fi/porta...rial15042011123710/lgg_valio_single_pages.pdf
  2. RustyJ

    RustyJ Contaminated Cell Line 'RustyJ'

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    Waverunner, excellent material. First time I have seen this depth of info on the different strains. Thanks.
  3. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

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    Ye, I was looking for such a compilation too. The handbook is really amazing, too.

    Edit: Just had to copy and paste this from the handbook of probiotics page 397 (great book!!). It's time that scientists take a closer look at probiotics because to understand what probiotics do in us is not that easy. Probiotics for example can promote the Th1 as well as the Th2 side of the immune system. I really would like to know what each strain does.

    "As for DC effects, the effects of probiotics on T helper and T regulatory responses are
    species specific. Some Lactobacillus strains have been shown to stimulate Th1
    cytokine production while others have increased Th2 responses or induced a mixed
    Th1/Th2 response. The cytokine patterns induced by intestinal bifidobacteria have
    also been shown to be strain specific and different Bifidobacterium strains may induce
    distinct and even opposing responses (190). In infants with cows milk allergy and
    eczema, treatment with LGG was reported to increase PBMC production of IFN-g,
    while a mixture of four probiotics that included LGG had no effect on IFN-g and
    increased IL-4 production (208). In animal models of autoimmune arthritis, some
    probiotic bacteria have been reported to inhibit Th1 responses providing beneficial
    effects while others have been demonstrated to aggravate disease by inducing Th1
    cytokine responses (201)."
  4. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

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    The potential of probiotics to treat diseases seems absolutely astounding. To understand their interactions however requires a lot of knowledge and much more studies. Instead of wasting billions of dollars for new pharma patents the medical science should look more into this field. We don't really know what the bacteria do or how they interact. Here is an example:

    "It is clear that different probiotic species and strains can have very different effects
    both in vivo and in vitro. The clinical or laboratory effects of one probiotic cannot be
    assumed for another probiotic species, or even for different strains of the same
    species. For example, in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial comparing LGG
    and a mixture of four probiotic strains (LGG, L. ramnosus LC705, Bifidobacterium
    breve Bbi99, Propionibacterium JS) for the treatment of infant eczema, beneficial
    effects were observed only for LGG and not the probiotic mix (216). Furthermore,
    LGG has been shown to enhance IgA responses against rotavirus, which are not
    foundwith different strains of the same species (202). In vitro, Lactobacillus species
    vary in their capacity to induce IL-12 production by murine dendritic cells. For
    example, a strain of Lactobacillus reuteri was found to specifically inhibit Lactobacillus
    casei-induced IL-12, IL-6, and TNF-a production bymurine dendritic cells
    and to inhibit Lactobacillus casei-induced upregulation of dendritic cell costimulatory
    markers (184)."
  5. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

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    Here is a great study about probiotics with E. coli Nissle. It seems to be a very good probiotic to increase intestinal integrity and reduce Leaky Gut:

    The current study establishes that E. coli Nissle 1917 positively impacts the intestinal epithelial barrier in vivo in three different ways. First, EcN is capable of producing a specific up-regulation of ZO-1 expression in IECs of healthy gnotobiotic mice. When treated concomitantly with EcN, IECs of mice with DSS-induced colitis also exhibit a pronounced expression of ZO-1 mRNA. Finally, EcN provides protection against the DSS-mediated leakiness of the gut in our mouse model. Our data strongly suggest that one of the protective effects of EcN treatment on colitis prevention could be a modulation of tight junctional integrity which in turn leads to preserved intestinal barrier function against noxious or infectious agents.


    German healthcare providers even cover the costs for probiotics with E. coli Nissle for their colitis patients because this strain seems to be euqally effective in treating colitis as standard drugs:

    Full study: http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0001308

    Abstract:

    Background
    Probiotics are proposed to positively modulate the intestinal epithelial barrier formed by intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and intercellular junctions. Disruption of this border alters paracellular permeability and is a key mechanism for the development of enteric infections and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs).

    Methodology and Principal Findings
    To study the in vivo effect of probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) on the stabilization of the intestinal barrier under healthy conditions, germfree mice were colonized with EcN or K12 E. coli strain MG1655. IECs were isolated and analyzed for gene and protein expression of the tight junction molecules ZO-1 and ZO-2. Then, in order to analyze beneficial effects of EcN under inflammatory conditions, the probiotic was orally administered to BALB/c mice with acute dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) induced colitis. Colonization of gnotobiotic mice with EcN resulted in an up-regulation of ZO-1 in IECs at both mRNA and protein levels. EcN administration to DSS-treated mice reduced the loss of body weight and colon shortening. In addition, infiltration of the colon with leukocytes was ameliorated in EcN inoculated mice. Acute DSS colitis did not result in an anion secretory defect, but abrogated the sodium absorptive function of the mucosa. Additionally, intestinal barrier function was severely affected as evidenced by a strong increase in the mucosal uptake of Evans blue in vivo. Concomitant administration of EcN to DSS treated animals resulted in a significant protection against intestinal barrier dysfunction and IECs isolated from these mice exhibited a more pronounced expression of ZO-1.

    Conclusion and Significance
    This study convincingly demonstrates that probiotic EcN is able to mediate up-regulation of ZO-1 expression in murine IECs and confer protection from the DSS colitis-associated increase in mucosal permeability to luminal substances.
  6. Enid

    Enid Senior Member

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    Gee - thanks for all this information Waverunner - an informed back to basics on my own now. Many thanks indeed.
  7. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

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    You're welcome. All I'm trying to do is symptom relief however. I'm still waiting for the cause and cure of CFS.
  8. cansado

    cansado

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    probiotics

    Thanks for the vital information!!! I have just started with making my own yogurt from coconut/goatmilk with a yogurt starter which consists of LACTOBACILLUS BULGARICUS STREPTOCCUS THERMOPHILUS and LACTOBACILLUS CASEI. Sorry for the caps. Also started with a specific carb diet. Good luck to you!
  9. Mya Symons

    Mya Symons Mya Symons

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    Thanks for this. The book looks really informative. However, I do not know if I can get through the material. Waverunner, do you have any idea which combination of probiotics and digestive enzymes are the best for combating heart burn and a colon not getting enough blood (poor circulation to sigmoid colon)? There are so many choices.
  10. cansado

    cansado

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    probiotics

    what I am wondering about is if I would take the lactobacillus strain would the other friendly strains also gain in volume? Otherwise I need to take quite a few strains and not all of them are favorable to my bowel..
  11. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

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    Hi Mya,

    very tough question. I don't think I can answer it. You could try Lactobacillus casei SHIROTA to increase intestine motility but I'm not sure if this will increase blood circulation.
  12. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

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    There definatly is an interplay between bacteria but there is still not enough information about it in order to make definitive claims.
  13. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

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    I just read some information about the causes of heartburn, please read:

    http://www.acu-cell.com/acn.html

    "Most people confuse Heartburn with high stomach acid levels. However, the discomfort is generally due to
    acid getting into the esophagus, which does not have the acid-protective mucous coating of the stomach, so
    it is basically a structural (reflux) problem.
    Or, 'heartburn' is due to low stomach acid levels, which develops after meals and results in bloating, nausea,
    and/or frequent burping, and which generally responds to acidic remedies such as apple cider vinegar, lemon
    or lime water, or acid-raising formulations containing betaine, pepsin, and glutamic acid. Bromelain can be
    considered for gastritis-related heartburn, where acid-raising supplements are contraindicated."

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