The 12th Invest in ME Conference, Part 1
OverTheHills presents the first article in a series of three about the recent 12th Invest In ME international Conference (IIMEC12) in London.
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Probiotics and cytokine activity

Discussion in 'Addressing Biotoxin, Chemical & Food Sensitivities' started by Aerowallah, Mar 23, 2016.

  1. Aerowallah

    Aerowallah

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    I keep coming across studies stating that probiotics induce cytokine activity, dose dependent, with certain bacteria causing more than others.

    So the probiotic itself becomes a source of inflammation? Is this another way of saying "sensitivity"? The studies don't seem to factor in issues like sensitivities, leaky gut etc. This reaction seems to occur in all people to varying degrees.

    I crave live culture kefir, but too much brings on itching and, eventually, a ramping up of my primary AF symptoms--fatigue and flu-like aches and pains in hands and feet. All probiotics are classed as high histamine, and I need at least a month of low histamine foods to rebalance and bring intolerances down.

    Anybody out there with similar reactions who is able to balance low doses of probiotics for their benefits?

    Do very small amounts as in these desensitization trials with infants quieten down an inflammatory response in time?

    As for taking probiotic pills to avoid reactions, I read these are classed with yogurt as being no better than transient bacteria without the ability to colonise. Hence that recent hospital study that showed no reduction in antibiotic diarrhoea with probiotic pills.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2016
  2. u&iraok

    u&iraok Senior Member

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    U.S.
    What studies are those? I can only find ones that say probiotics reduce cytokine activity.

    I have used low doses of certain probiotics and saw improvements, but I only have mild or mild to moderate ME/CFS. When I took too many of one type I had a reaction which appeared to be a detox for about a week and I felt better afterwards. I used an ionic footbath to help remove toxins and the water was very dark and I went to the bathroom a lot so I think the toxins didn't overwhelm my system. Again, I am not moderate or severe and everyone seems to react differently to probiotics.

    I found Ken 's website where he discusses probiotics helpful: https://cfsremission.wordpress.com
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2016
  3. Aerowallah

    Aerowallah

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    http://cvi.asm.org/content/18/4/621.full

    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1756464613002600

    http://www.sciencepublishinggroup.c...id=134010&doi=10.11648/j.acis.s.2015030201.11

    http://www.nutraingredients.com/Research/Two-s-a-crowd-for-probiotic-cytokine-production

    And there are more. All probiotics top the high histamine food charts and we know histamines are pro-inflammatory. Strain vs. strain I may not be differentiating between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, but when I pick up a bottle of kefir from a local farm with 40 strains how can I tell their "immunogenicities and types of T-cell responses"? These studies all hint at a future of designer probiotics tailored for each individual, but that sounds expensive and like getting away from a whole food source.

    I would love to be one of those who can push thru herx in a week, but my reactions seem to depend on inflammation elsewhere, histamines contributed by diet, and liver clearance--and then increases over time. I've hung in there for about 4 weeks before stopping the kefir, and have never had digestion or elimination problems, just itching and fatigue that lags for days and weeks.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2016
    Crux likes this.
  4. Womble

    Womble Senior Member

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    Is cytokine activity bad? I don't know what that means.

    I have had some bad experiences with probiotics personally, however, so I'm wondering.
     

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