Julie Rehmeyer's 'Through the Shadowlands'
Writer Never Give Up talks about Julie Rehmeyer's new book "Through the Shadowlands: A Science Writer's Odyssey into an Illness Science Doesn't Understand" and shares an interview with Julie ...
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Prenatal health and life outcomes: Unequal beginnings

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by leokitten, Apr 4, 2015.

  1. leokitten

    leokitten Senior Member

    Messages:
    580
    Likes:
    1,876
    Maryland
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2015
  2. leokitten

    leokitten Senior Member

    Messages:
    580
    Likes:
    1,876
    Maryland
  3. SOC

    SOC

    Messages:
    7,802
    Likes:
    16,459
    This article discusses disasters during pregnancy -- poverty, gross undernourishment, infections, badly polluted air, dirty water, binge drinking, exposure to the Chernobyl nuclear cloud. I think it's well-established that such events can cause long-term health problems in the developing fetus.

    I doubt most PWME were exposed to such poor prenatal environments, so I doubt it's a significant factor in later development of ME. If we see increased incidence of ME in areas of extreme poverty, high alcoholism, and dirty water, then there might be reason to suggest such a correlation. However, since most of us here were not exposed to such things in utero and still developed ME, I think the correlation is likely to be small.
     
    PennyIA likes this.
  4. leokitten

    leokitten Senior Member

    Messages:
    580
    Likes:
    1,876
    Maryland
    I guess I read the article differently, to me the take home message is that we are learning that even small events during pregnancy can have serious lifelong effects on the child. As they stated:
    Just having a relative die during pregancy or fasting during the day (and eating at night) for one month will have lifelong negative effects on the child:
    And about Chernobyl, they discovered that the radiation exposure in Sweden was so small and considered completely harmless yet the children in the womb during this time had problems:
    I know here in the US we have no idea half the time what we've been exposed to, much more so back in the 60s and 70s as there was absolutely no awareness and little government oversight. I believe it's completely plausible that the developing immune system and brain are much more fragile and sensitive than previously thought during these "first 1000 days" as they describe and that a seemingly OK prenatal environment combining with genetic predisposition caused subtle immune abnormalities that don't really show up until later in life and then we get ME/CFS.
     
    natasa778 and Sushi like this.

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page