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Pregabalin/Lyrica for insomnia: does it wear off?

Discussion in 'Sleep' started by Sasha, Dec 3, 2014.

  1. Sasha

    Sasha Fine, thank you

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    I've been on 75mg Pregabalin for insomnia for several years, without a medication review. A friend suggested to me that all insomnia meds stop being effective after a while.

    Is this true for Pregabalin?

    It was very helpful at first and changed my sleep from, say a horrible 4/10 to a bearable 6/10. I'd say it's 7/10 now. I'm wondering about coming off it to see whether my sleep has just improved on its own. However, my pharmacist tells me that Pregabalin isn't used for sleep :eek: so he can't advise me on how to come off.

    So, do the effects of Pregablin wear off over the years?

    If you've come off it, what tapering schedule have you found to be painless?

    I'll be discussing this with my GP but I'd like to go armed with some info.
     
  2. Sasha

    Sasha Fine, thank you

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    Bump! :)
     
  3. ukxmrv

    ukxmrv Senior Member

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    Sorry I couldn't proceed with more than 25mg of Pregablin due to side effects and that only in bursts It made me very hyper and then I crashed badly. Also got increased sinus infections. Had no good effects on my sleep.

    If I had something that worked for sleep I'd keep taking it. As an example I have been taking the same dose of Melatonin for years and the response is still the same.

    Hope someone can offer better advice
     
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  4. Sasha

    Sasha Fine, thank you

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    Thanks, X - that's interesting, because my GP wouldn't let me use melatonin for more than a few days in an emergency to avoid me becoming adapted and rebounding.

    Confusing! Very confusing!
     
  5. perchance dreamer

    perchance dreamer Senior Member

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    Two of my best doctors have told me it's fine to take melatonin on an ongoing basis. One pointed out that I am no spring chicken (I KNOW I'm old!!!!) and that natural melatonin levels decline as we age.

    I never had any success with melatonin until I started using a sustained-release version. Some people do better with a regular release. I use Jarrow Melatonin Sustain and split it in half so that it's 1/2 MG:

    http://www.iherb.com/Jarrow-Formula...w=jarrow melatonin sustain&rc=28&sr=null&ic=1
     
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  6. adreno

    adreno PR activist

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    According to studies, pregabalin does not build tolerance. However, I have read some reports from users who say it stopped working, or they needed to increase the dose. So I guess the jury is still out.
     
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  7. Sasha

    Sasha Fine, thank you

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    Interesting. I suppose it's possible that some people's underlying condition might worsen, leading them to feel that the pregabalin has become less effective.
     
  8. adreno

    adreno PR activist

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    Well, if the same dose has worked for you for "several years", I doubt it would suddenly wear off now. Tolerance normally develops more quickly than that.
     
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  9. Sasha

    Sasha Fine, thank you

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    Thanks, that's interesting - I didn't know that about tolerance.
     
  10. physicsstudent13

    physicsstudent13 Senior Member

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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pregabalin#Anxiety_disorders
    Like gabapentin, pregabalin binds to the α2δ (alpha-2-delta) subunit of the voltage-dependent calcium channel in the central nervous system. Pregabalin decreases the release of neurotransmitters including glutamate, norepinephrine, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide.[21] However, unlike anxiolytic compounds (e.g., benzodiazepines) which exert their therapeutic effects through binding to GABAA, pregabalin neither binds directly to these receptors nor augments GABAA currents or affects GABA metabolism (Pfizer Inc., 2006).[22] The half-life for pregabalin is 6.3 hours.[23]

    Is pregablin a preferrable drug for sleep disorders like central apnea and PLMD? I think my brain fog may be from glutamate level problems
     
  11. Sasha

    Sasha Fine, thank you

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    I have no clue, I'm afraid. :(
     

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