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Potential new drug to decrease brain inflammation

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by SpecialK82, Jul 25, 2012.

  1. SpecialK82

    SpecialK82 Ohio, USA

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    Scientists are working on a new drugy therapy that would decrease brain inflammation by binding to and decreasing cytokines! See below......

    For full text of article please see:

    http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/...ug-could-treat-alzheimer-ms-and-brain-injury/

    Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis and traumatic brain injury are four neurodegenerative disorders with very different – and very devastating – effects on the brain and daily life.

    While there are multiple treatments and therapies aimed at fighting each of these conditions separately, a team of researchers from Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine have developed a new “one-size-fits-all” therapy drug that could potentially treat all of them.
    The drug’s trick lies in reducing a particular type of inflammation in the brain known as neuroinflammation. This brain response has become increasingly considered a common denominator for many neurological disorders, as well as playing a major role in brain injuries. To decrease inflammation, the drug developed at Northwestern binds to and decreases a molecule known as cytokine, which is released in large quantities during the neuroinflammatory response.
    “We faced two main challenges,” Dr. Martin Watterson, a professor of molecular pharmacology and biological chemistry at the Feinberg School, as well as the lead developer of the drug, told FoxNews.com. “Come up with something to tone down the inflammatory response and do it with some selectivity [so that the immune response would not be toned down as well]. “We wanted to have a small molecule taken by mouth once or twice a day that would be relatively safe and get into the brain.”

    Published in the Journal of Neuroscience, the study showed the success of the drug in preventing progression of Alzheimer’s in mice that were genetically engineered to develop the disease. When the mice were evaluated 11 months after being administered the drug, their inflammation had decreased, and their brain synapses were functioning normally.
    While the results are encouraging, Watterson said there’s still some ways to go.
    “The design, the synthesis and testing [of the drug] took less than a year,” Watterson added. “In drug development, that’s called a hit. It’s like a bite when you’re fishing, it’s significant, but you still have to reel in the fish… You have to take the hit and improve on it to get a lead compound which has better activity in vivo and does not have bad activity.”
     
    merylg and RustyJ like this.
  2. RustyJ

    RustyJ Contaminated Cell Line 'RustyJ'

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    Thanks for posting. I saw this article the other day and thought it might be very relevant for us. Has potential to help us, although I am worried that there is more than one mechanism at work with these diseases. Their point about getting in early for treatment may mean that in the long term other mechanisms may prevail, eg viral integration. So you might help the inflammation in the short term, but in the long term damage caused by cell death in the brain will ultimately get you.

    I guess that most of us would welcome a few years of relief. God, I would take a few days.
     
  3. Firestormm

    Firestormm

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    Cornwall England
  4. SpecialK82

    SpecialK82 Ohio, USA

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    Thanks so much for the additional information Firestormm and WD!

    A quick quote from WD's article:

    "As in traumatic brain injury, this inflammatory response is part of the recovery mechanisms used by the brain, so the use of brief and focused treatments like MW151 could prevent the harmful effects of inflammation while allowing the protective effects to occur unimpeded."

    This would be quite amazing for us, if this drug could stop the harmful effects and allow protective to occur unimpeded, it makes me wonder - how do they do that??

    As I believe I just read (in Corrine's visit to Dr. P article?), he thinks the cognitive dysfunction that we experience is reverseable. So, I would think on the surface, that we could be in a better position than the Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis and traumatic brain injury mentioned.

    But we all know, ME/CFS is much more complicated than that, so viral integration and other mechanisms as Rusty pointed out, could win out in the end. Wouldn't it be great if Simmaron, or some such place, could get some PWC's into the clinical trials?
     

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