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Post colonoscopy gut pain improvement

Discussion in 'Gastrointestinal and Urinary' started by mermaid, Dec 30, 2016.

  1. mermaid

    mermaid Senior Member

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    I had a colonoscopy just before Christmas to check for cancer nasties - thankfully none there, not even any polyps. I was dreading the whole thing, especially the gut clearout gunk, but actually it wasn't as bad as I feared, and the sedative during the procedure kept me calm.

    Since then, i began some Symprove probiotics to help repopulate the gut. Previously I had periodic upper gut pain for years, (called Non Ulcer Dyspepsia by the UK NHS) which I believe to be histamine related and have managed to control better with diet. I also have historic IBS issues. Normally I avoid chocolate, and sugar generally along with gluten and some other things, but over Christmas I had no pain from the chocolate, or really at all! I am back now on my 'cleaner' diet (no or very low sugar, and no processed foods).

    Anyone else had improvement via a colonoscopy?
     
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  2. jstefl

    jstefl Senior Member

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    It happened to me. I didn't notice any differences for about three days, then for about a week I felt better every day.

    Unfortunately, after about 10 days all of the improvements suddenly disappeared, and I went right back to where I was before.

    For three years now I have been using resistant starch along with a mix of probiotics and have achieved about the same level of improvement as from the " clearout gunk" that you described, even though it has taken a lot longer.

    John
     
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  3. trishrhymes

    trishrhymes Senior Member

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    I'm guessing it was the combination of the 'clearout' followed by probiotics that has helped, rather than the colonoscopy. Maybe your gut now has a healthier microbe population. I hope the effect lasts.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2016
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  4. Thinktank

    Thinktank Senior Member

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    Yes, i always feel better thanks to the colonoscopy prep. Purging my bowels improves my brain fog and i just feel "good" for a couple of days after. Then the toxins build up again and the thick brain fog returns.

    Which prep did you take? I usually take the oldschool magnesium citrate dulcolax, it tastes horrible.
     
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  5. mermaid

    mermaid Senior Member

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    Oh dear @jstefl . Well I guess I am just past the 10 days stage, so we shall see! The only thing in my favour is that I have already spent some years on improving the whole gut area with foods and probiotics and kefir. I only stopped the kefir a few months ago due to the histamine effect.

    I had thought about the resistant starch issue, but never could quite get my head round what was easily available other than cooled potato, and I kept forgetting to do that! I will try it though as I now get some baby potatoes which would be ideal (having been also told potato is not good for us by other sources!).
     
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  6. mermaid

    mermaid Senior Member

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    Funny you should mention the brainfog @Thinktank as though my gut is behaving nicely, the brainfog has been dire recently, and I don't usually get it!

    I had to take NHS UK standard prep which in my case was Moviprep. It sure did move things, though actually I had little cramps with it, which I had thought I would. The taste of it is vile though.
     
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  7. kangaSue

    kangaSue Senior Member

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    I think the same principle applies as part of the reason why the couple of clinics here in Australia that do FMT (fecal transplant) like you to do a colonoscopy prep before having fecal microbiome transplant other than for an inspection of the bowel too, it purges the loose bowel content as well as the intestinal wall giving the best chance for the new microbiome to take hold.
     
  8. mermaid

    mermaid Senior Member

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    I am now a month past my colonoscopy and things are still pretty good with my gut overall. Prior to the procedure I did have mostly upper gut sensitivity which I had been able to get under reasonable control with diet, but still had to be careful. I would say that things now are similar to how they had been. Most of my gut reactions are to high histamine foods but as long as I limit the load it seems OK.

    I did have a dreadful gut spasm about a week ago for no apparent reason in the mid gut area. It doesn't happen to me often. This time I took paracetamol and thankfully that did the trick and it relaxed. Also I noticed some twinges in the lower left gut which kept occurring for a few weeks after the colonosocpy (not an area I had ever had problems) but they seem to have died down now.
     
  9. shaqun

    shaqun

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    My personal opinion is getting a full allergy test if you havent done yet. You may have allergies to some foods. Finding an allergen can change your life quality if you are allergic, including relief from whole pains even your IBS can be related. If you eat something you are allergic to, you will have pain due to histamin release, your intestines, stomach can get upset. As your immune system thinks you eat something is harmful, when it is in your stomach it causes stomach to be upset, when it passes to your intestines, it sends signal to intestines there is something harmful there, then intestines gets upset which then results IBS. Just wanted to explain how food allergy works in a very simple way of explanation. :)

    I'm glad you feel better. Thanks to our technology today, we have colonoscopy to examine deeply. One of the best side of colonoscopy is, it fixes psychology even better than some anti-depressants when it comes to IBS. Because you realize there is no cancer, there is nothing wrong with your intestines, that gives you a huge relief that you already aware of now. :). I believe you will be able to eat chocolate sometimes in the future soon. Life is beatiful in any condition, isnt it ? :)
     
  10. mermaid

    mermaid Senior Member

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    Thank you for your comments @shaqun
    The problem within the health care system that I have to use (the UK) is that they would be reluctant to test me for allergies when they would not view my reactions as allergies, but as sensitivities, which are viewed differently. As I understand it, an allergic reaction would be much faster (and could be more life threatening) than a sensivity. From what I have read, both allergies and sensitivities are on the increase and the health system cannot cope with the demand on its time.

    I am not sure I totally agree with you with regard to the psychology matter of the colonoscopy. I guess that could be true for some. However I had very reactive food pain for years, and it seems unlikely to me, that the psychology of knowing I do not have cancer would have reversed that.

    As it happens I thought it unlikely that I did have cancer but I was encouraged to have the colonoscopy due to blood in my stool (they give a free test here for the over 60s). I thought it was more likely caused by haemorrhoids, and I was dreading the test more than the result!

    So after the test done, I had less reactivity for a while, but that seemed to me to be a physical reaction not a psychological one. Normally I try to stick to a strict diet anyway, but over Christmas I had some chocolate without any bad reaction. I suspect this is due to the bacterial clearout which of course does not last for long. Since Christmas I have tried to keep to my diet more strictly for fear of the pain restarting and past history has shown me that I could eat a small amount of chocolate occasionally but not to go overboard (it's addictive so I tend to cut it out entirely usually!).
     
  11. shaqun

    shaqun

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    If bacterial clearout would be even a very small sign of cure for IBS, Crohn, Colitis. There wont be chronic patients with such diseases as simply taking probiotics all the time would supress bad bacteria in the intestines could be a permanant solution. Bacteria is not a bad thing in intestines, when it is 50/50. Taking probiotics surely balances bacteria to 50/50. A healty person must have 50/50 good/bad bacteries.

    I wouldnt throw psychology, especially if a one diagnosed with IBS in the past. Knowing you do not have cancer can effect your total mood. People who have IBS usually does not aware that they have a bad psychology, and tons of time they dont believe that it is psychology.

    Before you do not know that if you have cancer is picture B. After you have learned that dont have is picture A. Intestines are the second brain of a body. The hand in picture B is your brain. I respect your idea and it might not be related to psychology, but in your colonoscopy releif case I give it %90 to psychology just in my opinion.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2017
  12. mermaid

    mermaid Senior Member

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    @shaqun
    I have heard of some people using Kefir (a home made drink which has many types of bacteria) to help with their IBD, Crohn's and IBS, but I don't know if any studies have been made re the results. I made my own kefir for several years, and used it, and certainly my IBS is much better than it used to be, though I also keep to a restricted diet too. I understand that often the good bacteria in probiotics do not stick to the internal surfaces and multiply, which is the aim, but with the many different bacteria in kefir maybe some do make it. It would be interesting to see some studies though. There was a mini study on a UK programme last week called Don't Trust me I'm a Dr. which gave better results for kefir than 1. supermarket probiotic drinks or 2. eating inulin.

    With regard to the psychology aspect. I do not believe in saying anything is the answer or not the answer, and that includes psychology. In my own case I believe I know my body better than anyone else. For example, I have been under severe stress for the past 2 weeks and it has certainly affected my sleep and my back muscles from the tension but my stomach has been fine! I doubt whether in my case my stomach issues are primarily to do with my mind in the psychiatric sense of that.

    Actually I am unsure why psychology is always given the job of helping with someone's digestive issues when from what you describe (and with the pictures) I would have thought that neurology should be the right department (although I know of course that neuropsychiatry does cover to some extent). Yes, of course the brain under stress can change the way the body works, but the endocrine system comes into play too and the immune system, so the whole thing is quite complicated really and not necessarily an easy fix.
     
  13. shaqun

    shaqun

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    @mermaid
    Kefir is the number one probiotic that I also drink sometimes but not a complete solution until the psychology is fixed. Kefir helps digestive system to work in a proper way, thats why people get relief from kefir. On the other hand, many people also unable to drink kefir because their IBS gets worse when they do.

    About psychology and digestive system, all I can say is, your gut wouldnt hurt, when you fall in love for the first time in your life if it wasnt related. :) It is true other conditions are involved but when all blood works are fine, including endoscopy works, then we do know it is %95 psychological.
     
  14. mermaid

    mermaid Senior Member

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    @shaqun
    Actually the quote from godwanaland is interesting as my gut certainly was having problems with histamine last Autumn, so after taking in kefir OK for several years I stopped it. I had had several histamine reactions (possibly triggered by stress, possibly by some eye drops or maybe both together), and it took a while for the whole thing to calm down. Now it is OK again, so I am thinking of restarting kefir!

    That said, as I mentioned, I do have a lot of stress in my body right now, and a bit of Lichen Planus in my mouth (which I get when stressed), but gut is working fine thankfully.

    I am not sure if you meant to say endocrinology above rather than endoscopy? I know that an endoscopy checks out the gut, but endocrinology being off kilter can affect things too. I am hypothyroid, and a lot of hypo people have gut issues I have noticed. Mostly my hypo was fixed, for a few years, but due to some other issues beyond my control (Endo thinks I am overdosing on thyroid meds as TSH too low), I now have to cut back to protect my bones, and so everything has gone a bit haywire for me. So far my gut seems OK though thankfully.
     
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  15. erin

    erin Senior Member

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    @mermaid I had a similar story 3 years ago. I felt better initially after the colonoscopy though I was warned that I now had no gut flora and I will slowly built up the flora within 3 months. Well, the discomfort returned approximately 4 months later with the new flora and slowly got worse and worse.

    I was told there was no threat of cancer after the colonoscopy however, inflammation was noticed in the sigmoid colon and rectum. A biopsy revealed non specific inflammation, maybe inflammatory bowel disease. I got worse since then unfortunately I believe I have IBD.

    @shaqun I do not believe my mood effects my bowel health but just the other way round, my bowel health effects my mood. I don't believe in psychological factors.
     
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  16. shaqun

    shaqun

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    @mermaid
    I meant endocrinology + possible all other studies when I said 'all blood works are fine & endoscopy' that means we eliminate almost everything for sure before it is called psychological. I'm glad you do feel better now. This is my and my friends theory on histamin reaction and relation to ME/CFS. http://forums.phoenixrising.me/index.php?threads/hi-from-medical-student.49058/page-2#post-808845

    That means unknown cause and generalised effect. Dont think the worst in the first place.

    We do not know the cause of non specific inflammations(Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis) today, just like we dont know why we got stomach ache when we are so excited or sad that is related to brain. Of course there are some other conditions and possible causes such as genetical factors but they are rare and psychological factors are top.

    I wish we have a solution for such issues. The psychology is not my field but I do know it effects your whole digestive system including bowels. Here comes my word for those who stressed for health concerns, " You will never get better, until you stop trying to get better ". The way to do this, allow everything to be happened, dont analyse anything in your brain that is happening to you, simply stop fighting. When a person get used to this behavior, the brain stops release signal of adrenaline in few months which causes most of the issues in the first place especially digestive system problems. It is known that, adrenaline is the responsible for physical symptoms, so if I were you, I would believe that your mood is effecting your bowel health. More adrenaline, none-stop problems.
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2017
  17. erin

    erin Senior Member

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    @shaqun if you were me you wouldn't like it, I can assure you. You probably won't believe me that I'm not stressed about having ME. But I would like to get better, naturally.

    Inflammation is always present in ME. Therefore, inflammation in bowels are not that infrequent in ME patients. Some ME sufferers have IBD and Chron's as well. It doesn't matter that medicinal science does not yet know why this is the case, but this is the case unfortunately.

    I am not yet diagnosed waiting the results of tests to find out next week. But I know I already have Chron's. As I knew I had thyroid disease and I am suspecting I have adrenalin issues. But the doctors will diagnose me a year later, that, it's official is a different story.

    When you have ME, nothing works, all the enzymes supposed to be released are not released due to the malfunctioning immune system and lack of mitochondrial energy.
     
  18. Gondwanaland

    Gondwanaland Senior Member

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    What you call psychological is in fact biochemistry of hormones and neurotransmitters.
     
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  19. shaqun

    shaqun

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    That is the question I'm looking for and researching. I'm focusing on completely gut and malfunction of gut cells at this point. I will have news after I work on this with some microbiologist folks soon. I will be happy if you share your results with me.

    It is true. Well, I couldnt find a better way to provide an example of psychology effects even the love reaction is considered hormones and neurotransmitters without scientific speech. If there was a way to explain the effects directly with the root cause on non specific inflammation, we could have fixed the IBS and IBD today.
     
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