New Atmosphere, New Vision: Gibson and Whittemore Kick Off Invest in ME Conference 2016
Mark Berry reports on Dr. Gibson's introduction and Dr. Whittemore's keynote speech, at the 11th Invest in ME International ME Conference in London.
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Possible Benefits despite no Diagnosis

Discussion in 'Finances, Work, and Disability' started by cman89, Apr 21, 2015.

  1. cman89

    cman89 Senior Member

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    Hayden, Idaho
    I am looking at trying to get back to some sort of work, despite not having been diagnosed officially with anything save chronic sinusitis. However, I am aware that I may have to consider the fact that I would be incapable of work, plus the fact that I have obvious restrictions that make finding the appropriate job much harder. I know that there is a resource bank thread here, but I need help on "possibly" obtaining benefits despite no diagnosis. I am also hearing impaired, so I may be able to utilize that as an argument point. Located in the US.
     
  2. Valentijn

    Valentijn The Diabolic Logic

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    @cman89 - Disability is assessed based on symptoms and limitations. The diagnostic label is less relevant. But in any case, you should be regularly seeing a doctor who is documenting your symptoms and disabilities.
     
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  3. Alea Ishikawa

    Alea Ishikawa Ichthys

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    I agree with Valentijn. It's the proof of impairment they would be looking for, regardless the label. Even if you don't meet the requirements for an ME/CFS diagnosis, you might still be under something else. Do you have any tests/assessments from your doctor that prove your disability? There should be official documentation on your condition and also your declining health, if applicable.



    Keep in mind that it's not just about working some - but your ability to reliably work and receive a living wage. "Substantial," "gainful employment," I think they call it. I can work, for example, but I am limited in what I can do and for how long. That could be very important for your determination.

    The Social Security website has some great ideas here and here. Beware that a tilt-table test might make you crash (i.e. be out of working order). A neurocognitive test might help?



    You may want to look into Short-term Disability and see if you can get anything there, too.
     
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  4. cman89

    cman89 Senior Member

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    Hayden, Idaho
    What type of neurocognitive test?
     
  5. Alea Ishikawa

    Alea Ishikawa Ichthys

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    The one I was given was CNSVS. It displayed various indicators, one of which was something like reaction or processing speed. It might help to prove that you'd be unable to keep up with production demand, have significantly reduced memory, etc. But you'd also need a proper doctor/specialist evaluation in conjunction with it.

    I did mine through a CFS specialist for $85. The test is relatively cheap, but the specialist was not. When you do testing, just do your normal - no sweat, even if you accidentally mess up and such.

    Cognitive testing is under Section II. E. here. Basically, it goes in line with any clinical evaluation that would prove severe impairment.
     

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