Invest in ME Conference 12: First Class in Every Way
OverTheHills wraps up our series of articles on this year's 12th Invest in ME International Conference (IIMEC12) in London with some reflections on her experience as a patient attending the conference for the first time.
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Possible alternative reasons for immediate food reactions

Discussion in 'Addressing Biotoxin, Chemical & Food Sensitivities' started by drob31, Jan 22, 2016.

  1. drob31

    drob31 Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,210
    Likes:
    696
    I've been thinking a bit about why people have immediate reactions to certain foods or eating too much food, and it goes back to cortisol levels. As you can see in the chart below, cortisol is released when you eat, and the amount of cortisol in your body triples when you eat a sufficient number of calories.

    [​IMG]

    The body requires cortisol in order to aid in the metabolism of fat, protein, and carbohydrates. But what if you're not producing enough cortisol to meet this demand? I can see two outcomes; 1. Your body diverts to using pregnolone using the progesterone pathway, thus lowering DHEA, but possibly still not producing enough cortisol. This brain fog lasts until the food passes through the stomach and the need for cortisol decreases, bringing you back to a more "manageable" state. 2. Your body diverts to the progesterone pathway, but there simply isn't enough pregnenolone, so you are left with a deficiency of all adrenal hormones, and metabolites of pregnenolone are also used for neurotransmitters, which could contribute to the brain fog.

    The more common theory, since food sensitivities and reactions are not usually type one hypersensitivities (the type accepted by allopaths), is that you may have leaky gut, and or your body begins an autoimmune attack when it detects certain substances in foods you eat like animal proteins for example. Removing these triggers stops the autoimmune attack, or toxin pass through to your blood stream (via leaky gut). This is why the autoimmune paleo diet works for many who have this sort of reaction. And it has been suggested consuming a small amount of a certain food could trigger this autoimmune reaction for months.
     
    merylg, Skippa, Gemini and 1 other person like this.
  2. roller

    roller wiggle jiggle

    Messages:
    451
    Likes:
    214
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2016
  3. drob31

    drob31 Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,210
    Likes:
    696
  4. Ekaterina

    Ekaterina

    Messages:
    32
    Likes:
    17
    Russia
    I always have an immediate food reaction after all food, but it's more intensive after fatty, fermented food, carbonated drinks. Also I have an immediate reaction on meds. The intensity of reaction depends on my intestinal condition. If my gut is ok I can tolerate all above. If it's not, especially if I have a diarrhea period, the crash can be pretty severe. But it's interesting, that this reaction begins when the food touches the stomach, when it's not yet in the gut. But it's connected definitely with intestinal condition. The mechanism is still a secret for me, but I assume that when the food touches the stomach it increases the level of some substance. And mb this substance increases in its turn the intestinal permeability. I still try to find the answer to that, but unfortunately still have no clue.
     
  5. Old Bones

    Old Bones Senior Member

    Messages:
    807
    Likes:
    4,865
    I, too, have been confused about experiencing an almost immediate reaction after eating. You mentioned more intense reactions after eating fermented foods and drinking carbonated beverages. Also, medications. This can be indicative of histamine intolerance, or an excess of mast cells (which release histamine). You've also made a connection between your response and intestinal condition. Healing the gut is supposed to reduce histamine reactions. Unfortunately, the most-recommended gut-healing protocols involve eating foods that typically make histamine problems worse (eg. bone broth, fermented foods). If you are not familiar with histamines and mast cell disorders, there is much information on-line. Dr. Janice Joneja is well-known and respected in this field. And, there are many discussions on this forum, since quite a few of us are affected.
     
    Ekaterina likes this.
  6. PennyIA

    PennyIA Senior Member

    Messages:
    718
    Likes:
    1,663
    Iowa
    Hmmm... I'm leaning towrds histamine intolerance more so for me, personally- or other 'intolerances' tied to something I don't get.

    For the theory around cortisol, I experience excessively high production of cortisol all day long (according to the naturalpathic doctor it was mind-blowingly high and she didn't even know what to suggest). I'm assuming if I can't sort it out that it will potentially lead to adrenal fatigue and subsequently low production of cortisol as it's as if I'm being chased by a tiger all day every day right now - so it's only common sense that the body isn't designed to work that way and it'll end up crashing one way or another.

    But my histamine levels are also high routinely and I've had several connections to not just immediate food intolerances but also larger and new allergies to foods, medications, natural fiber (wool, etc) (identified by the noted presence of hive and swelling reactions when exposed to the new allergens or existing allergen that used to not bother me - but does now).
     
  7. drob31

    drob31 Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,210
    Likes:
    696
    Have you looked into cushing's sydrome for the high cortisol levels? Have you tried eating safe carbs?
     
  8. PennyIA

    PennyIA Senior Member

    Messages:
    718
    Likes:
    1,663
    Iowa
    I have looked at cushing's syndrome a few times - but truly? The symptoms I have fit ME/CFS to a T and the few symptoms I have that fit Cushing's Syndrome only fit it because they are common between the two.

    What do you mean by eating 'safe' carbs? Since I'm gluten and dairy free and already have to limit my fat intake and nothing fried nor greasy; as well as limit my purine intake thanks to intolerances, gall bladder removal and gout... so I am interested... but really am not looking forward to more reductions in my diet.
     
  9. Old Bones

    Old Bones Senior Member

    Messages:
    807
    Likes:
    4,865
    I am also gluten-free. My favourite "safe" carbs are butternut squash and sweet potatoes. They are both lower-purine vegetables, and are considered suitable for individuals with food intolerances and gout.
     

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page