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Poll: How many X-Rays have you had?

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS Discussion' started by Willhm, Sep 17, 2013.

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How many x-rays have you had? (Estimate if not sure).

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    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. 1-2

    10.5%
  3. 3-4

    15.8%
  4. 5-6

    21.1%
  5. 7+

    52.6%
  1. Willhm

    Willhm

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    Hello,

    I was just thinking today about that when I was younger (I'm 18) I had quite a few x-rays, for my knees, elbow a few times and wrist. And I was just wondering if other people with ME had had many x-rays, it might be nothing but I just thought I would ask. I have had ME for over 4 years (some of that time was glandular fever though I suppose) and my last x-ray was probably about a year before getting glandular fever.

    Like I said it might be nothing but just interesting to see if there is any correlation. Also I mean x-ray 'sessions' as one 'session' for say a suspected broken bone might contain quite a few x-rays.
     
  2. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    You'd really need to quantify the X-ray radiation dose people have received, rather than just count the number of X-rays they received. This is because the X-ray radiation dose varies enormously, depending on the type of X-ray.

    X-ray radiation dose received from an X-ray can be measured in millirem (abbreviated to mrem).

    A single dental X-ray can have a radiation dose as low as 0.5 mrem, whereas a barium enema gastrointestinal X-ray series exposes you to a radiation dose as high as 875 mrem.

    The following table shows how the radiation dose varies considerably with different types of X-ray:

    —————————————————————————————————————————————————
    Some X-ray Radiation Dose Examples
    —————————————————————————————————————————————————
    HIGH DOSE GROUP ............................ mrem
    Barium enema: lower GI series .............. 875
    Pelvimetry ................................. 595
    Barium meal: upper GI ...................... 535
    Mammography: breast examination (per breast) 500
    Lumbrosacral spine ......................... 450
    Small bowel series ......................... 422
    IV pyelogram (kidneys, ureter, and bladder . 420
    Lumbar spine ............................... 347
    Thoracic Spine ............................. 247

    MEDIUM DOSE GROUP
    Gallbladder ................................ 168
    Abdomen .................................... 147
    Ribs ....................................... 143
    Pelvis ..................................... 133
    Skull ...................................... 78
    Hip ........................................ 72

    LOW DOSE GROUP
    Cervical spine (neck) ...................... 52
    Femur (upper leg) .......................... 21
    Dental (full mouth series) ................. 9
    Dental (one x-ray) ......................... 0.5
    —————————————————————————————————————————————————
    Source: here
    —————————————————————————————————————————————————


    Also the part of the body exposed might make a difference. Certain body tissues are very sensitive to X-rays. Lymphoid organs, bone marrow, blood, testes, ovaries and intestines are much more sensitive to X-ray radiation. Reference: here.

    The sensitivity of tissues to ionizing radiation like X-rays is termed radiosensitivity.


    Note that the radiation dose that every person receives annually from natural background sources (like cosmic rays from space, natural radiation from rocks, and from radon gas in the air) is about 600 mrem per year.
     
  3. wdb

    wdb Admin

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    London
    anne_likes_red and WillowJ like this.
  4. WillowJ

    WillowJ Senior Member

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    WA, USA
    fwiw, I never had any x-rays or CT scans until I was already ill. (except dental x-rays)
     
  5. ukxmrv

    ukxmrv Senior Member

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    Maybe change the question to ask number before the onset of illness?

    I had two before (one dental and one on my elbow) but many more in the decades after due to a road traffic accident
     
  6. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Senior Member

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    Australia
    I only had low dose dental xrays before my illness started.
     
  7. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Senior Member

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    Australia
    I only had low dose dental x-rays before my illness started.
     
  8. Willhm

    Willhm

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    I didn't quite realise the vast difference between difference between different types of x-rays so I can see now the question is a bit lacking in detail and won't really give a clear answer as one x-ray might be more powerful than five smaller scale ones.
     
    ukxmrv likes this.
  9. Thinktank

    Thinktank Senior Member

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    Europe + South East Asia
    In the past 6 months:
    - 2 MRI's with contrast fluid
    - 1 CT scan with contrast fluid
    - 1 PET/CT scan whole body with contrast fluid
    - 2 X-rays

    Talk about radiation overdose...
     
  10. Thinktank

    Thinktank Senior Member

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    Arg.. still can't edit my posts. Is there a way to "measure" the radioactivity in your body?
     
  11. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    One interesting thing is that cancer patients who have undergone radiation therapy (or chemotherapy) quite often develop chronic fatigue syndrome soon after. See: cancer related fatigue.

    Radiation therapy gives a dose of around 5,000,000 mrem, and this is much higher than the radiation doses you get from the average X-ray (around 1 to 1,000 mrem). Though in radiation therapy, most of the radiation is directed at the tumor.
     
    taniaaust1 likes this.
  12. Valentijn

    Valentijn Activity Level: 3

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    I was reading about this yesterday, in the context of a glutathione gene which I'm missing. Apparently both the missing gene and chemotherapy are implicated in some cases of aplastic anemica, which sounds like it could cause some fatiguing symptoms - though should be easily diagnosable with a blood count, etc?
     
  13. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    Valentijn
    In the cancer related fatigue Wikipedia article, it says that anemia (presumably including aplastic anemia?) is a cause of fatigue in cancer patients, but this is a cause in which the mechanism is known (and can generally be treated).

    But cancer patients often develop a ME/CFS-like fatigue after radiation therapy or chemotherapy for which the cause remains unknown, just as in ME/CFS.


    Cort Johnson's site has some interesting articles on this subject:


     
    taniaaust1 and Valentijn like this.
  14. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Senior Member

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    I take a step back when I consider cancer-related fatigue. You could say that the fatigue could be as a result of changes due to having cancer, or you could take a further step back and say that the fatigue could be as a result of physiological changes that also led to a high likelihood of developing cancer. In any event, they need to do way more research.
     
  15. overtrain

    overtrain Medical Mafia needs to die via this virus.

    Have had countless Xrays in 51 years. Wrists, knees, jaw, teeth, ribs, chest.

    Do want to add that when Xrayed, we don't necessarily know what areas get included in any Xray. Had my wrist Xrayed recently, & doctor called me to ask if I knew I had a broken rib, bc the pic showed not just my wrist placed on table in font of me, but also my rib cage...

    Interesting about the norepinephrine... ADHD meds act on that, so I wonder if that is exacerbating my CFE/ME.
     

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