New Atmosphere, New Vision: Gibson and Whittemore Kick Off Invest in ME Conference 2016
Mark Berry reports on Dr. Gibson's introduction and Dr. Whittemore's keynote speech, at the 11th Invest in ME International ME Conference in London.
Discuss the article on the Forums.

PLOS’ New Data Policy: Public Access to Data

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Dolphin, Feb 24, 2014.

  1. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

    Messages:
    10,708
    Likes:
    28,266
    @Sean drew my attention to the following, which I thought was worth highlighting more widely:

    http://blogs.plos.org/everyone/2014/02/24/plos-new-data-policy-public-access-data/

     
    Bob, wdb, Ritto and 7 others like this.
  2. SOC

    SOC Senior Member

    Messages:
    7,839
    Likes:
    16,551
    Great news!
     
    Esther12 likes this.
  3. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,639
    Likes:
    35,707
    Logan, Queensland, Australia
    A small step in the right direction. Its a beginning. Once all science is treated this way, then anyone can closely watch to ensure quality science is being reported.
     
    Valentijn and Esther12 like this.
  4. Sean

    Sean Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,260
    Likes:
    18,001
    The only remarkable thing about this simple step is that the scientific community declined to take it for so long.

    Seems a complete no-brainer to me. How can you possibly do proper independent analysis and verification – which surely is the basis of good quality peer reviewed science – without access to the basic data?
     
  5. Valentijn

    Valentijn Senior Member

    Messages:
    14,281
    Likes:
    45,850
  6. biophile

    biophile Places I'd rather be.

    Messages:
    1,520
    Likes:
    16,577
    Not a bad move.

    The policy only requires that the data relevant to the paper is made publicly available. So there is still room for omission, for example, by simply leaving out any analysis for which the researchers do not want the dataset publicly known. The policy may also discourage some researchers from submitting their papers to a PLoS journal.

    I guess this means we will never see another PACE Trial paper in a PLoS journal? At least any paper which involves revealing datasets which can be used to calculate the improvement and recovery rates as laid out in the earlier protocol.

    Afterall, we couldn't have the plebeians discovering by themselves that the improvement and recovery rates according to the stricter original definitions are several times lower than the over-hyped figures that were published instead!

    Researchers often see the data as their own and string out as many papers as possible.
    Sharing the data means others can publish other papers before them?
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2014
    peggy-sue and Valentijn like this.
  7. Sean

    Sean Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,260
    Likes:
    18,001
    Researchers who generate the data certainly get the right to first bite at the analytical cherry, for say 12 months. After that it should go into the public domain, (after being properly anonymised, of course).
     
    Valentijn likes this.

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page