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Please provide input on my symptoms and how to handle...

Discussion in 'Detox: Methylation; B12; Glutathione; Chelation' started by Mindy, Aug 26, 2013.

  1. Mindy

    Mindy

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    Before starting 2 methyl vitamins, I had a very high sulfur diet with no problems. One dr. had me start activitated forms of b-12 and folate based on only testing MTHFR. I did this and ended up in a big mess.

    I've now done 23andme (results below) and been on a low-sulfur diet for nearly 4 months. My head symptoms/fog had finally resovled until this week. The only things I did differently were drank a few glasses of wine over the last week and a course of amoxocillian. Now my head is feeling an extreme amount of pressure when I eat, even low-sulfur foods. I'm taking butyrate and a liver supplement with molybedenum, which previously would help, but doesn't seem to help this week.

    I can't hardly focus at work. It was never this bad. Please help determine what may be causing this and what I should do. Thank you.

    BHMT-08++
    CBS+-
    COMT++
    DAO++
    FOLR2++
    MTHFR A1298++
    a lot of other MTHFRs are ++ or +- (but C677 is --)
    MTHFS ++
    NOS3++
    SHMT1++
  2. Valentijn

    Valentijn Activity Level: 3

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    Alcohol intolerance is a very common aspect of ME/CFS. You should probably avoid alcohol completely.
  3. lnester7

    lnester7 Seven

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    I don't know if this will help you, In MY CASE, I get pressure in the head when I over hydrated. I lower electrolytes and water consumption and the pressure goes away.
  4. caledonia

    caledonia

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    I would also like to suggest that there is some gut involvement. The gut and the brain are closely linked. The amoxicillin could have put you over the edge by destroying good gut bacteria. You could try doing some probiotics to see if that will make a quick fix.

    In general, though, you have SHMT which is one of the leaky gut genes, and you're reacting to foods which is another sign of leaky gut. So I would suggest doing some stool testing and if that indicates problems, doing a 4R gut rebuilding program.
  5. Mindy

    Mindy

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    Interesting about the gut. I have taken a LOT of antibiotics for chronic bladder infections (trying to avoid them and use herbals when possible). I definetly have a yeast problem that I'm combatting. Though my recent gut profile wasn't terrible, it was prior to several rounds of ABX recently. I'll add in SeaCure to work on the gut. Thanks!
  6. Crux

    Crux Senior Member

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    Hi Mindy;

    With a DAO++ snp, you're probably having alot of problems metabolizing histamine. Red wine is high in histamine, and it's also a DAO inhibitor.

    I've read that some antibiotics are also DAO inhibitors.

    The substances required for histamine metabolism, that I've read about are: B6, vitamin C, and copper.

    http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/85/5/1185.full

    I don't know how much may be needed, sometimes low dosages work better, and they don't upset other nutrients.
  7. Critterina

    Critterina Senior Member

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    How did you figure out the risk alleles for these? Thanks for reminding me about NOS3, also!
  8. Mindy

    Mindy

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    I'm sorry, but I'm not sure what the risk alleles are...can you explain?
    Critterina likes this.
  9. Mindy

    Mindy

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    Interesting. Seems like this could also be playing into it as I've never experienced the symptoms I am before. What I can't seem to figure out though is why all of a sudden these substances are causing a reaction in me (well, after I took the active b12 and folate). Prior to that, I had no issues with sulfur, alcohol, antibiotics, nothing at all.

    Since taking those supplements with incorrect guidance, I'm having terrible problems. Will this ever level back out without treating for the mutations? It's got me so off balance, I just want to stop it all and go back to the way my body functioned before, tolerating most anything. Thanks for the input.
  10. Critterina

    Critterina Senior Member

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    How did you figure out whether you were +/+? I have been browsing my raw data of and comparing what I am to the risk allele (the one you don't want to have). It's just really hard to figure out which one is the risk allele. I look them up in dbSNP and it even says "with pathological variant" or "Clinical interpretation: Pathologic" or something like that, and I can't figure out if it's the A, T, C, or G that's the bad one.
  11. Critterina

    Critterina Senior Member

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    I found this article on histamine intolerance. I'm going to talk to my nurse practitioner about it tomorrow.
    http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/85/5/1185.full
    DAO and HNMT are copper-containing enzymes, and copper-chelating agents (like Levaquin, which I was on for 30 days when this started) inhibit them. Although they say that the cofactors B6, copper, and Vitamin C are discussed as being controversial, I'm hoping that my copper deficiency, when cured, will cure the histamine intolerance.
    I also found a good article on copper, which may or may not be of any use to you, depending on whether you test for it:
    http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/88/3/859S.long
  12. Crux

    Crux Senior Member

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    Hi Mindy; I've only read anecdotes about people describing their reaction to folate as like having high histamine.

    You're probably right about stopping for a while, to let it all go, then, if you feel poorly still, try very small amounts.
  13. Mindy

    Mindy

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    Well, based on what you've indicated maybe I'm not ++ for it. I'm new to this, and I'm not familiar with determining which is risk allele and the impact of those. Clearly, I've got more research to do!
  14. Critterina

    Critterina Senior Member

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    I'm guessing you had good reason to put it as +/+, like the output from some interpretive program? I didn't know anyone else was even looking at DAO besides me, and I've never heard of FOLR2.
  15. Mindy

    Mindy

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    It came from the results of the 23andme interpretation from MTHFRsupport.com. Of the 3 DAO results reported, 2 were +/+. What program did you use to interpret your results? I've copied the risk allele info for each of the 3 DAO snps that were tested below (it includes my results b/c I couldn't delete them here for some reason):





    DAO
    rs2070586

    A AA +/
    DAO

    rs2111902
    G GG +/+
    DAO

    rs3741775
    C AA -/-
  16. Critterina

    Critterina Senior Member

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    Thanks for that! Now I know the rs numbers and can look up my results! I used Promethease and Genetic Genie. Mostly I just 'browse raw data' on the 23andMe website and then go to dbSNP by rs number to find PubMed articles (abstracts mostly) that talk about the research - and hopefully tell me which is the riskier allele and what the health risk is. Some are really frustrating because they say we looked that all these alleles and some correlated to this disease, but if you want to know which, you have to buy the article.
  17. Critterina

    Critterina Senior Member

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    OK, so I'm

    DAO rs2070586 risk=A AG +/-
    DAO rs2111902 risk=G GG +/+
    DAO rs3741775 risk=C AA -/-

    Thanks! I guess that makes me somewhat susceptible to histamine build-up in general, and probably more so with a copper deficiency.
  18. Valentijn

    Valentijn Activity Level: 3

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    If you look at the "variant viewer" for the gene (should be listed both near the top of the page and in the purple box on the map), then there's a column for the OMIM database or some such, then if you click on the "rs" number for the SNP you're looking at, it should take you to the relevant section. There it should be listed as protein-number-protein, like A22Q or Ala22Gly.

    They'll usually go into more detail, saying they found an alanine to glycine substitution, but even the basic notation indicates that "Ala(nine)" is the wild type (normal version) because it's listed first, and "Gly(cine)" is the pathogenic mutation. Often times it'll also say what the allele variation is in the gene, such as C to T. But you can also go back to main page for the SNP, and right above map it'll show something like C->T under "allele change" and Ala->Gly under "residue change". Then you know that the C allele results in the Alanine residue (normal) and the T allele results in the Glycine residue (pathogenic).

    The "residue change" results are usually in the right order (normal first, then pathogenic/rare second), but not always. I think sometimes they aren't when the mutation isn't known to be pathogenic. But then you can look at the "MAF/Minor Allele Count" near the top or the "Population Diversity" bars near the bottom to see which version is uncommon. The uncommon version won't necessarily be pathogenic, but can still be interesting when it's very very rare.
    Critterina likes this.
  19. heapsreal

    heapsreal iherb 10% discount code OPA989,

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    australia (brisbane)
    what was amoxicillin for??
  20. Critterina

    Critterina Senior Member

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    Valentijn, I knew there was an efficient way to do this. Can I have you check out my logic for one I tracked down? I'm working the CYP17A1 results from 23andme. There's a section at the beginning of the report that says CYP17A1-AS1; I did a couple of those and decided to skip that. I looked up rs1004467 and i5001480.

    rs1004467 I am AG, so whatever, I'm a half-mutant. Ancestral allele T, Reference alleles C/T. The variant viewer says T>C So maybe 23andMe is looking at the opposite strand? When I look at dbSNP, it shows a red box on the graph in the swim-lane labeled "Association" and there's an association to blood pressure. I look at the article and see that they are talking about a fairly common mutation asociated with a rare hypertension. So, assuming opposite strand, then the G would be the mutation, and the risk allele.

    To the right of the first rs#, I see a purple box and note the location is the same as that listed for i5001480. So, that's my second SNP. I note it is rs104894150, and I am AA. I see in the Gene Model(s) that the mutation is T to A, and the residue change is Y to N, the mutation is Y201N. I don't even need to use the variant viewer here. It's labeled missense, but looking in the referenced publications, it looks to be associated with infertility in menstruating women,even though it's a fairly mild reduction in gene activity. And I'm homozygous for the mutation.

    You know, I did gene this because I'm having post-menopausal adrenal steriod hormone issues - not making, not metabolizing what's supplemented, and I'm talking about it so you can check out my methods, but geez! if it keeps going at this rate, I'm going to get really discouraged about getting my adrenals healthy again.:eek:

    Thanks, Valentijn. I'm getting an education, and doing it more efficiently is a big help!
    Valentijn likes this.

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