1. Patients launch $1.27 million crowdfunding campaign for ME/CFS gut microbiome study.
    Check out the website, Facebook and Twitter. Join in donate and spread the word!
Phoenix Rising Adds Two New Board Members
Mark Berry introduces the new President of Phoenix Rising, Dr. Gary Solomon, and welcomes Professor Jonathan Edwards to the Phoenix Rising Board of Directors.
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Please help me understand these 23andme results

Discussion in 'Genetic Testing and SNPs' started by bkklow, Feb 12, 2014.

  1. bkklow

    bkklow

    Messages:
    7
    Likes:
    1
    Hi all,

    I recently got my 23andme results back and have a few questions. I understand I am heterozygous for MTHFR C677T which means I probably need to supplement with methylfolate, which I already do. I currently take 800mcg of methylfolate, 5000mcg of methylb12, and 50 mg of B6. As well as 5000IU of D3 and 400mg of magnesium. The other ones on the chart I don't have much info about. Of course the homozygous ones concern me the most. Can some folks take a look at my results and help me do a little interpreting? Thanks.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Critterina

    Critterina Senior Member

    Messages:
    787
    Likes:
    352
    Arizona, USA
    @bkklow ,

    Congratulations! You did a pretty good job of that! If you have high homocysteine, I would suggest you consider TMG for the BHMT 08 +/+. It will help recycle homocysteine to methionine without using up methylfolate. And I wouldn't even consider TMG to be an "important" supplement for you without that lab result.
     
  3. bkklow

    bkklow

    Messages:
    7
    Likes:
    1
    Critterina thanks for your reply. Any thoughts on the homozygous CBS 699T result? I've done a little reading and I'm just confused. Some say this is just terrible and others make it out to be like it's not that big of a deal. From what I've read most folks who have this usually have high sulfate and ammonia levels and should avoid sulfur rich foods. Well Houston we have a problem, because Egg's, onions and garlic are near the top of the list of foods I absolutely love. I also read somewhere that people with this tend to have LOW homocysteine levels. Is that true? How does that correlate with the other defects like MTHFR C677T? What supplements should I be taking for this?
     
    Critterina likes this.
  4. Critterina

    Critterina Senior Member

    Messages:
    787
    Likes:
    352
    Arizona, USA
    So, you know that not everyone on this forum agrees on certain things, and CBS C699T probably tops that list. My opinion: no need to supplement or to stop eating the foods you love. The research support CBS C677T being a slight/moderate acceleration of the effect of the gene; that would lower homocysteine some. If they were making you miserable, you probably wouldn't love them. (Although...tomatoes, peppers, spinach, pumpkin, cheese, cinnamon...those are all things that make me feel miserable and I used to love them! Give me a chance and I'll love them again, but for now I choose breathing; I love that, too.)

    There is a forum that discusses the CBS research. If I find it, I'll add it to this post. You can decide for yourself.
     
    Valentijn likes this.
  5. bkklow

    bkklow

    Messages:
    7
    Likes:
    1
    So could you say if someone is Homozygous CBS C699T and Hetero or Homo MTHFR C677T that the CBS defect could actually be counteracting the high homocysteine levels that C677T can cause? I guess I'm asking should I still be taking folate and B12 with the CBS defect possibly already driving down homocysteine? Is there such a thing as having too little homocysteine? I'm guessing the best answer would be to have to get blood testing done to actually see where the homocysteine level is.
     
  6. Critterina

    Critterina Senior Member

    Messages:
    787
    Likes:
    352
    Arizona, USA
    CBS C699T lowers homocysteine, but I don't know if too little is a problem. The folate/B12 will compete with the CBS so that more of the homocysteine gets recycled: I think that's a good thing.
     
    Valentijn likes this.
  7. bkklow

    bkklow

    Messages:
    7
    Likes:
    1
    So I ran my report thru sterling Hill's app and came back with a few more results than running thru genetic genie. On the genetic genie report all three of my COMT results came back -/-. On the sterling hill report there is an extra result simply called "COMT" and I'm +/+ for that. Any significance in that?
     

    Attached Files:

  8. Sea

    Sea Senior Member

    Messages:
    739
    Likes:
    856
    NSW Australia
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/SNP/snp_ref.cgi?rs=6269
    Prevalence 37%
    Part of the Non coding area of the Gene

    I can't see any real significance for that one. From your 23andme browse raw data page you can enter the rs number in the snp search box and see your result. If you click on the + at the left hand side a drop down menu gives you links to more information about the snp or the gene.
     
  9. Sea

    Sea Senior Member

    Messages:
    739
    Likes:
    856
    NSW Australia
    High homocysteine is a marker that tells you there is a problem rather than being a problem itself. High homocysteine has been associated with cardiac risks but some studies have shown that lowering it hasn't lowered the risk. Some things can change the marker but not necessarily change the problem.

    So a CBS polymorphism may prevent the homocysteine from rising but that doesn't necessarily indicate that it has any effect on the problems created by the MTHFR mutations
     
  10. Sea

    Sea Senior Member

    Messages:
    739
    Likes:
    856
    NSW Australia
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/SNP/snp_ref.cgi?rs=6269
    Doesn't look significant. Prevalence 37%. Non coding region of the gene.

    To find more information about your snps you can follow the links from your browse raw data page on 23andme.
    Enter the rs number in the snp search box and your result will be displayed.
    Click on the + sign at the left of the snp and a drop down menu appears with links to dbsnp and Google Scholar where you can find more info on the snp or the gene.
     
  11. bkklow

    bkklow

    Messages:
    7
    Likes:
    1
    Have a question on my detox profile. I already found out that being homo for CYP1A2 means I'm probably a really slow caffeine metabolizer. Good thing I gave that up a while back. But my question is being hetero for two of the CYP2D6 enzymes. Does that classify as a poor metabolizer or does it fall somewhere between normal and poor? Maybe the correct term would be "reduced"? Just wondering because I'm getting ready to start a med that is primarily metabolized by CYP2D6.

    And what are the repercussions of being homo for two of the CYP1B1 genes? Thanks
     

    Attached Files:

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page