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PGE2m - Prostaglandin E2 (dinoprostone)

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS Discussion' started by snowathlete, May 28, 2013.

  1. snowathlete

    snowathlete

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    So of all my tests that got run recently, this one is the one which was described as "strongly increased":
    PGE2m Prostaglandin E2 (dinoprostone)

    I dont know what the m on the end stands for or what signficiance it may have.

    My result is 28.03 (normal range: 0.17-6.45)

    I read somewhere that this can have something to do with tumors...which is only interesting, if I am right about that, because I got a small growth of some kind on the ball of my foot about a month or two ago. Related? I don't know.

    Anyone know anything about PGE2?

    Thanks
     
    justy likes this.
  2. Sushi

    Sushi Moderator and Senior Member Albuquerque

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    I was tested for PGE2f (0.10 - 2.8). I was normal.

    I believe, in our case, this is tested as an inflammatory marker.

    Sushi
     
  3. adreno

    adreno 3% neanderthal

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    Curcumin inhibits PGE2.
     
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  4. MEfighter

    MEfighter

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    I was also tested for PGE2f and mine was pretty high. I also believe this to be a marker for inflammation. It makes sense that it would come up elevated as all previous tests that look for inflammation (PCR, elastase) have always been very high / through the roof high so I know inflammation is definitely and issue for me. :/
     
  5. MEfighter

    MEfighter

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    Maybe you can ask the lab that ran the test what kind of a marker it is? I looked it up on Google but didn't really find anything much. I also looked up the one I was tested for (PGE2f not m) but ditto.
     
  6. Daffodil

    Daffodil Senior Member

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    Prostaglandin E2 is elevated in alzheimer's disease and ALS too. I found some articles about this but they are over my head.

    I also read that PG E2 inhibits secretion of gastric acid, which would result in all kinds of gut issues.

    Aspirin can increase secretion of HCL, which is perhaps why my doctor recommended an Aspirin every morning..my PGE2 was very high, too.

    xo
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2014
  7. Thinktank

    Thinktank Senior Member

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    Maybe try berberine, that's what i've been recommended to take for highly elevated PGE2.
    In my case it's related to lyme disease. PGE2 can really screw up the hypothalamus leading to HPA dysfunction.
     
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  8. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6

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    I did a blogpost about links between PGE2, other inflammatory chemicals, ME and polyuria, in case this is of interest.
     
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  9. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6

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    Could the 'm' and 'f' relate to male and female? Maybe the different genders tend to have different levels, hence the letter to help determine whether it is normal, high or low? Just a guess.

    But I found one site that said the 'm' meant metabolite.
     
  10. adreno

    adreno 3% neanderthal

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    Interesting, I would like to know more about this?
     
    MeSci likes this.
  11. justy

    justy Senior Member

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    My PGE2 was high also.
     
    snowathlete likes this.
  12. snowathlete

    snowathlete

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    I was on berberine most of last year. Can't recall if it lowered it or not. Will try to check.
     
  13. ahimsa

    ahimsa Senior Member

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    I recognize "PGE2" but I have no idea what that additional "m" or "f" means. I tried to search but didn't find anything useful.

    Prostaglandins (PGE2 and others) are also an important factor in endometriosis. This is related because a study (many years ago) found that women with endometriosis are more likely to have an ME/CFS diagnosis or autoimmune problems. (see http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/sep2002/nichd-26.htm)

    Endometriosis is yet another one of those diseases that does not get enough funding or respect from the medical community. And women's symptoms are often ignored or downplayed ("it can't hurt that bad...") even after a surgical diagnosis (and a patient can't fake having endometrial tissue in the wrong place).

    A few links:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20511671

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22003899

    http://www.endo-resolved.com/prostaglandins.html
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2014
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  14. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6

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    Just looked up berberine on Examine.com and think I will give that a miss, as it has potentially adverse effects on the gut and muscle and maybe neurons as well. See here.
     
  15. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    I have written about issues related to this for a long time. Its a deep topic. I first got interested in this in 1993.

    M is for metabolite I think, eg;

    http://ndt.oxfordjournals.org/content/5/11/937
    They look for metabolites because eicosanoids in general, which include prostaglandins such as PGE2, often have a half life of seconds. They are hormones that typically operate in ranges of less than a millimeter. The eicosanoids are darn hard to find, but stable metabolites can persist for many hours.

    Its been apparent since the late 80s that something might be wrong with eicosanoid regulation in ME and CFS. Inflammatory hormones, nitric oxide, peroxynitrite, glutathione depletion, oxidative stress and other things can affect this. We still do not know much about it though, and this area of science evolves very fast, with new eicosanoids being discovered regularly.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2014
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  16. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6

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    So what would 'f' be?

    Sometimes health workers' (including doctors and labs) notation terms are very esoteric and hard to find definitions for from internet searches. I've had this problem before.

    I was baffled by 'BMs' on a report of my condition at a hospital, but it turns out to be a common term amongst health workers to mean blood glucose. A bit of internet searching found a nurses' forum where even some of them were baffled by the abbreviation!

    EDIT - have just looked in a couple of files of medical abbreviations that I have saved, but there is nothing about PGE tests.
     
  17. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    I have been trying to figure out "f". So far I am baffled. Shhhh, don't tell anyone.

    Very often though PGE2 is mentioned in conjunction with an F-something receptor, I wonder if that is what it is about. I haven't looked into this enough yet.

    Eg. receptor FPR2/ALX
    But also PGF2.
     
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  18. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6

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    It's OK, Alex - even superheroes like you and I don't know everything! :D
     
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  19. halcyon

    halcyon Senior Member

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    According to these folks that do testing for prostaglandins, F2a is a metabolite of PGE2. PGF2a activates the prostaglandin F (FP) receptor.

    Does anyone here that has elevated PGE2 suffer from shortness of breath? I see one of the effects of F2a is bronchoconstriction.
     
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  20. halcyon

    halcyon Senior Member

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    And I guess more to the point of the the original question, PGE2M appears to be 13,14-dihydro-15-keto-prostaglandin E2 which is another metabolite of PGE2 it seems.
     
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